Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

Ich hätte gerne This expression (usually) requires a noun following it. Ich hätte gerne drei Semmeln Ich hätte gerne einen Freund But: Ich hätte gerne gezahlt This last one is substantially different from the first two. Those first two are the subjunctive II forms of haben followed by the word gern(e) (to make the sentence more polite), and ...


2

While c.p. is right with the usage of hätte gerne. I would like to add something. möchte and würde is in this context the same. It's just the difference of being more polite or not. You could say. Ich möchte gerne zahlen. Or. Ich würde gerne zahlen. The same you could say with hätte: Ich hätte gerne die Rechnung. hätte: Ich hätte ...


0

So, würden is pretty much the English particle would. But in German the would have has a particular form: hätten = haben + würden. Something similar happens with möchten: möchten = mögen + würden. Like mögen and haben, some other verbs are würden-eaters: they have their own natural own form in subjunctive mood. But not all of them are. Here is ...


4

Wer oder was wächst denn wirklich? Nicht "die Deutschen", denn würden in dieser Formulierung als Individuen um x cm in die Länge wachsen, sondern "die Anzahl/Zahl der Deutschen". 133 Prozent beträgt das Wachstum der Zahl der Deutschen, die mit Airbnb reisten. Weil "das Wachstum der Zahl der Deutschen" fürchterlich klingt, wird "Wachstum" zum Verb ...


2

The "sich" is indeed reflexive. You can drop it and just say Es lohnt nicht... but the version with "sich" in it is much more common. You can also insert something else for "sich". Es lohnt die Mühe nicht. It's not worth the hassle. But the options what you can insert are very limited, not by grammar but by what sounds idiomatic. Es lohnt ...


3

I want to know if I can replace the "sich" with "dich" and it would still mean the same thing. No, you can't. es lohnt dich nicht isn't a sentence with any meaning in German (think about it as it's not worth you, which also doesn't make sense). I think that "sich" here would refer to "Sie" (unmentioned) and if I replace the words I would then be ...


2

You can drop the word "sich". "Es lohnt nicht." is valid and will be understood. And you are right: The word "sich" is reflexive to "Es" (It) at the beginning of the phrase.


2

I always thought of stimmt in reference to adding numbers. So if somebody is making an argument, it also can add up logically and a person might say stimmt. Genau means exactly.


2

Die Wörter Müdigkeit (1.), Erschöpfung (3.), Schläfrigkeit (4.) und Ermattung (5.) sowie außerdem Ermüdung, Ruhebedürfnis, Schlafbedürfnis, Übermüdung, Bettschwere, Abgespanntheit, Entkräftung, Kraftlosigkeit, Mattheit, Mattigkeit, Schlaffheit, Schlappheit, Zerschlagenheit, Abgeschlagenheit und Lassheit können je nach Zusammenhang Synonyme sein. Der Begriff ...



Top 50 recent answers are included