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1

Ich gebe meine Wäsche in die Waschmaschine. Stecken and reintun is ok, but I would rarely use it. Werfen or legen really does not work for me.


0

How about "fortschreitend" and "ongoing"?


3

stecken is definitely ok. You can also use tun without rein which will be in your case: Vor dem Zubettgehen habe ich meine schmutzige Wäsche in die Waschmaschine getan However you should know that tun (present) is often avoided because it's some kind of children's language and not very sophisticated. If your washing machine is very full you can use ...


5

Another word that could be used is depublizieren, but it has a rather specific meaning, which may not be exactly what you are looking for. German public TV stations are supposed to take down news after a certain time. German public TV is financed by a forced fee from every German household. This rule made because the websites of public German TV stations ...


0

A one-word synonym for "In progress" is "Pending", in English. In German, Google translate tells me the word is "anstehend".


1

Perhaps better as a trivialism rather than for the name of a project phase... underway: unterwegs


1

Is there anything wrong with "dennoch"? It's very common.


1

"Nichtsdestotrotz" und "Trotzdem" are best suited in this case.


0

This pair is what I've seen quite often: in progress: im Prozess


4

open - Eröffnet accepted - Angenommen active - Aktiv closed - Abgeschlossen/Beendet rejected - Abgelehnt Personally I still prefer the two word phrase "in progress - In Bearbeitung" in this context.


1

Ok, let's see. I probably wouldn't use "offen" for open. If we're talking about the life-cycle of a project, perhaps "aktuell" or "aktiv" might work? Likewise, "abgeschlossen" is a much better choice than geschlossen or umgesetzt, in my opinion. As to "in progress": what about "in Arbeit"?


8

You would not say in Umsetzung in German. Correct would be wird umgesetzt, for your case I would use the short term in Arbeit or semantically better, but longer in Bearbeitung.


6

I would prefer in Bearbeitung instead of in Umsetzung. In my opinion is open/offen not a good term or the state is unclear. offen is a good translation for open, but i think it is a umbrella term like active for new accepted / assigned in progress The Project Ticket System "Trac" has a new state. see German translation from the Trac Ticket System ...


1

You should take into account that in another language it would be better to set up things differently instead of translating. For example, it would work better in German to have a status indicator Öffentlich/Privat and a button next to it that says "Ändern".


5

I usually use Veröffentlichung zurückziehen as tooltip for icons, because the text is lenghty. It translates to revoke publication. A shorter option might be verstecken, which is not semantically correct (means hide), but is the shortest coresponding word I can think of.


5

There are different options. Assuming you translate "to publish" with "Veröffentlichen", I'd call it "Veröffentlichung aufheben" or "Nicht mehr veröffentlichen". Shorter would be "Verstecken" (= to hide), but that's not exactly the same thing.


5

There can be many alternatives -- Some examples: Something like getting ready for a party Wenn meine Schwester sich für die Party zurecht macht, braucht sie Stunden. Or maybe to put on some color/make up Wenn meine Schwester Farbe/Make up auflegt, dauert es Stunden. Or just something like getting beautyful: Meine Schwerster braucht ...


2

In general, you can use every verb as a noun in certain contexts in German. The nominal character of nominalised verbs becomes clearer if you use definite articles. Furthermore, in your case, i would use Hüten instead of Behüten: An Sylvester war ich mit Aufräumen und (dem) Hüten meiner Kinder sehr beschäftigt.


4

Behüten as a noun is very rarely used. For my ears it sounds a little old and over sophisticated. Better use something like auf meine Kinder aufpassen or um meine Kinder kümmern. So in this sentence that would be An Silvester war ich sehr beschäftigt damit, auf meine Kinder aufzupassen und aufzuräumen. or even better An Silvester hatte ich alle Hände ...


2

You could also translate it a little more literally with Nach allem, was ich weiß, ... or Nach allem, was ich gehört habe ...


-1

I would say "Der Polizist fand einen Ausreißer (eine Ausreißerin), der/die am Highway entlang ging. or "Der Polizist fand einen Ausreißer (eine Ausreißerin) am Highway entlanggehen.


5

"mit Stil" or "sehr stilvoll" are both possible. I'm not sure though if in English the phrase "with style" also has a strong connotation to elegant, as it does in German. "stilisch" is not a proper German word. You either mean the English word "stylish" that is used a lot by young Germans or the word "stilistisch", which would translate to "stylistic".


4

You should rather translate it with Soviel ich weiß ... It keeps the emphasis on the amount of knowledge.


2

In addition to the other answers: wegräumen (duden article) In my experience Ich habe die Spielsachen weggeräumt. would be the most appropriate way to express that you just put some toys back to their places. While aufräumen can certainly be used in this sense, it can also be used to put an area/room/container back to an uncluttered state. ...


4

I would suggest the term Ausreißer in this context. The proper translation would then be: "Der Polizist fand einen am Highway 75 entlanggehenden Ausreißer (eine entlanggehende Ausreißerin)" I am aware of the fact that this is more complicated but in my book this would be a good translation. Easier but still correct: "Der Polizist fand am Highway 75 einen ...


3

Hmmm, Google translate gives me: der Ausreißer runaway, stray bullet der Ausbrecher escapee, jailbreaker, gaolbreaker, runaway der Flüchtling refugee, fugitive, runaway Also possible IMHO: der/die Flüchtige However, we can't use constructs like "entlang gehen finden". Looks like you want tell too much in one sentence. Ein ...


5

Ausreißerin: typically a teenager running away from home or an institution


2

In addition to the other answers, I would like to point out that etwas einräumen can also have an entirely different meaning: Der Offizier hat Fehler eingeräumt. This would translate to The officer has admitted errors. No objects are being moved around here.


3

To specifically address the title of your question: einräumen: Putting something into something. aufräumen: Arrange things to reduce chaos. verräumen: This can be used like einräumen. I would say it is a bit more archaic; I heard this often at the Bundesmarine, whose soldiers often use a special slang. Also heard often there was verbringen (which also has ...


1

Yes, you can also use aufräumen in this context. In this case verräumen means removing something to create space, so it is very close to aufräumen. I live in Germany and I have never seen ver räumen, so I tried to look it up and couldn't find it. You should consider using aufräumen instead.


1

Mit Humor nehmen This phrase is only being used though about jokes directed at the person itself. When the joke is generally offensive, "Spaß verstehen" would be a better choice.


2

"Nichtsdestoweniger" as well as "gleichwohl" are uncommon and would indeed feel weird for a German. "Trotzdem" is by far the most commonly used word.


1

The formal way of "to say" is... "sagen". This word is entirely fit for any context. "Erwidern", "entgegnen", "antworten"... all those are speech tags too but they do not mean "to say" but rather something along the lines of "to respond".


5

Erwidern is quite formal (it is hardly ever used in spoken language outside of legal or political discussions, more commonly encountered in written form). It means to reply to a question or a statement. An alternative that shares the same basic meaning would be entgegnen, which I would also consider rather formal. Antworten is certainly the most common way ...


2

Man kann im Deutschen einen Satz mit "so" beginnen, zB "So, jetzt tut es Dein Spielzeug wieder". Es drückt dann eine vorangegangene Änderung eines Zustands aus. Anderes Beispiel wäre, wenn ich meinem Sohn nach dem Händewaschen sage "So, jetzt kannst Du wieder spielen gehen".


7

"So" is indeed never used in German in the sense of English "so" (therefore) at the beginning of the sentence, that is usually translated as "also". The "so" in your example sentence means something like "here" or "it's finished", and in that sense it can and is used at the beginning of a sentence. "Well" doesn't really represent the meaning.


0

For the victim, it doesn't make a big difference. Yet for the perpetrator it does make a difference. When the court finds that he murdered the victim, then he will go to jail for many years. OTOH, when it was an accident, he may even go free. A hat B ermordert. implies A hat B getötet (oder umgebracht). But the converse is not true. For ...


5

The most important facts have already been mentioned in the answer of Patric Hartmann. However, I'd like to add some further information. Töten is sort of generic term and is defined as to take someone's life (in German: jemandem das Leben nehmen). This word on its own does not contain any further hints on how the killing has been executed. And töten also ...


6

ermorden = murder It means to kill somebody by intention out of base motives (e.g. greed, jealousy, etc.). töten = kill (in general) It is the general term for any kind of killing. Töten can be intentional or unintentional, it can refer to people as to animals. It is, unlike English, rarely used for abstract things like programs yet almost solely for the ...


1

Man sagt – und das zweifelt wohl keiner an – Meine Eltern sind... Das ist Plural. Also sind es mindestens zwei. Und zwar Mutter und Vater. Um das Argument zu kräftigen, vergleiche man das mal mit beispielsweise "Meine Schulklasse ist...". Hier ist eine Menge an Personen in einem Wort, das ist im Singular steht, verschmolzen. Und noch ein Beispiel: ...


-5

Es gibt keinen Unterschied zwischen den beiden Begriffen in der üblichen Benutzung. Elternteil könnte auch ein einzelnes Teil der Eltern bezeichnen, also z.B. die Arme der Eltern, die Beine der Eltern usw. Normalerweise spricht man aber nicht von Teilen eines Menschen. Folglich bezeichnet Elternteil einen Teil der Gruppe „Eltern“. Apropos: Der Singular ...


7

Man kann definitiv beides sagen. Es gibt aber einen wichtigen Unterschied. Der Singular von Eltern - das Elter - wird im Deutschen fast nie verwendet. Stattdessen wird meistens auf das Elternteil zurückgegriffen.


0

können refers to ability or possibility. dürfen refers to permission by another person. But in colloquial language können is often used instead of dürfen, especially when talking to persons of equal standing.


6

"Darf ich" means "am I allowed to" or "may I", while "kann ich" means "can I". Same as in English, the expression "kann ich" is often also used when asking for permission, but the main difference between the two is, that "kann ich" means to have the ability to do something, while "darf ich" only means to have the permission to do it. Another example would ...


2

Kann ich dich küssen? Is translated with: Am I able to kiss you? While Darf ich dich küssen? is translated with: Do I have the permission to kiss you?


0

If you translate "though," in the sense of "however," the word I would use is aber. Das Wetter ist ABER gut.


0

Person 2: "Weather is nice though" Immerhin ist das Wetter schön. Jedenfalls, das Wetter ist schön. Zumindest das Wetter ist schön. Auf jeden Fall ist das Wetter schön. Trotz allem das Wetter ist schön. Das Wetter ist gut immerhin. (not really correct grammar, though)


2

All the answers here are fine, but I am afraid there is no true equivalent to the english swiss-army-knife word "though". A feature I often miss in German. But there is another swiss-army-knife word in German, which is absent in English and this is the word ja. You find it in many places and the literal translation "yes" doesn't get you anywhere. Luckily ...


3

I feel that Aber das Wetter ist gut. comes near. It may be less specific, but since the construction involves no inversion, it better preserves the laconic nature of the comment.


3

The German equivalent for "though" at the end of a sentence is mostly allerdings. Two heart attacks in a year. It hasn't stopped him smoking, though. Zwei Herzinfarkte in einem Jahr. Mit dem Rauchen hat er allerdings nicht aufgehört. Here would fit aber, jedoch, trotzdem, freilich as well. In other cases, as in your example, you can use wenigstens, ...



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