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18

Both are correct. To me, Ich esse gerne Pizza hints at a question like Was ist Dein Lieblingsessen, whereas Ich esse Pizza gern would be more appropriate as an answer to Magst Du Pizza? That is, I would put the important word (the one carrying new information) at the end of the phrase.


16

Putting "bitte" at the end is grammatically correct but it is not the usual place where Germans put it to be polite. As phant0m already pointed out you will put more emphasis on your request by doing so. This makes it almost a demand and therefore takes away some of the politeness that may have been intended. If you put "bitte" at the end of the sentence it ...


15

The German verb has to come second. The first position can be filled with whatever. Thus the phrase "gibt es" can totally be part of statements Es gibt in Berlin gute Bäcker. In Berlin gibt es gute Bäcker. As the other answer already mentions, "Gibt es" is the order you'll find in questions. Gibt es in Berlin gute Bäcker? AND it can be also ...


15

The phrase Ich weiß nicht. is used in colloquial language to express uncertainty, doubt and disagreement, usually when asked for an opinion on something. For example, I wouldn't be surprised to witness the following dialogue: (Two girls in a shop) A: Was hältst du von diesem Kleid? B: Ich weiß nicht... - (thinks about it briefly) - Wenn du ...


14

Welcome to GL&U! Your sentence uses a double infinitive forming the perfect tense in a dependent / subordinate clause. That sounds kind of complicated, but break it down into its smaller parts and then put it back together (I did also find an English page for you that further explains some of these peculiarities). First, recognize that a subordinate or ...


14

Beispiele für Postpositionen: dem Ende entgegen der Einfachheit halber der Kinder wegen … Und dann gibt es auch noch die Zirkumposition: „um des Friedes willen“


13

Neither sentence is wrong. German word order is rather flexible, and while there is a tendency to have the second part of a split verb at the end, it isn't always the case. Possible reasons for pulling it to the front include improved understandability (when the intervening part would be long) and putting emphasis on a specific part of the sentence. In this ...


12

Yes, it's perfectly correct. However, I would argue that it has a slightly different meaning: If you place "bitte" at the end of the sentence, you put more emphasis on it and make it clear that you really expect him/her to do what you ask.


11

Ich esse gern Pizza sounds more natural than Ich esse Pizza gern to a native speaker, even though both are correct. Better: Ich esse gerne Pizza (standard language)


11

Welcome to the wonderful German world of free word order and inserted relative clauses! So perfect that not even Germans do it right all the time (even if they're in the Spiegel). in dem Wladimir Putin und Alexis Tsipras in Moskau vor die Presse traten is a relative clause which can be turned into a main clause to read Wladimir Putin und Alexis ...


11

To be precise, "Die kleine Raupe Nimmersatt" doesn't translate to "The very hungry caterpillar". The English title is the original one, and the German one is a translation. I'd say the translator allowed himself a certain degree of freedom, as it is common in literature. "Nimmersatt" is a nice word to express "very hungry" very concisely. In fact, it goes ...


10

I would use and recommend 'zum Seufzen bringen', or 'seufzen lassen', not 'seufzen machen' and surely not 'machen seufzen'.


10

The sentence is correct. While it is much more common to have the verb at the end, in this particular case there is an emphasis on the need to return, while the destination is rather a side information. This can be expressed by using this word order. You can find some background information on canoo.net. The technical term that applies here is that of a ...


10

los is a regular adjective meaning off (in the sense of unleashed or detached). The basic idiomatic expression using los is the following sentence: Etwas ist los. Something is unleashed/moving (figuratively: going on). los does not become an adverb here as the sentence is simply assigning the attribute los to the subject etwas. los is an adjective ...


10

Both word orders are correct and only slightly differ in emphasis: Whatever you put first in this case, is slightly more focussed by the question (at least that’s my impression, even native speakers can disagree over this). Some examples in context: Ich kann in Hamburg, München und Köln einen Hut kaufen. Aber: Kann ich in Berlin einen Hut kaufen? ...


10

Die Kommas gehören unabhängig von der Wortstellung dort nicht hin. Folgende Möglichkeiten: Dir hat der neue Film also nicht gefallen? Also hat dir der neue Film nicht gefallen? Der neue Film hat dir also nicht gefallen? sind alle drei grammatikalisch richtig und vom Sinn her gleichwertig. Das Wort „also“ stellt hier einen Bezug auf einen im ...


9

Both forms are grammatically correct. However, the first one sounds more natural to me (as a native speaker). I would guess the reason is focus. Since jemand is not specific, it is odd to put focus on it. This is what the second version does. Things would look different if the sentence were Glücklicherweise hat Maria mich hereingelassen (and not Hans). ...


9

You would not normally put "frei" at the beginning of the sentence. It's not technically wrong, but simply unidiomatic most of the time, very much like the English "free I am". Unless you're really stressing that point (or want to imitate Yoda) go with options #1 and #3. "Ich habe frei" means that you're off, on vacation, not working or in school that day. ...


8

dem Alter entsprechend Gerüchten zufolge tu's mir zuliebe Dazu auch halber, entgegen, entlang, gegenüber und wegen... Wikipedia zufolge.


8

The correct version of your sentence would be Ich gehe abends an meine Uni, um Deutsch zu lernen. It means that you usually go to the university in the evening. This could be a simple statement or an answer to Wann gehst du zur Uni, um Deutsch zu lernen? (When do you go to the university to learn German?) You could also use this word order Abends ...


8

You definately have to get used to it :). Anyway, when I observe myself I have to say that I can anticipate the second verb most of the time. In your example I would assume sprechen as soon as I hear Deutsch. If I knew the person and we are talking in a context of languages anyway I would probably know by the gut. This is mainly because I have heard this ...


8

Think differently: It's not about placing gern "on either side" of the object, the basic rule is that adverbs that modify other parts of the sentence ("nicht", "auch", ...) are placed directly in front of the part they modify. So in "... gern Gemüse", gern applies specifically to Gemüse. This is also true if an adverb modifies a verb. However, in a main ...


8

In German, using subordinate clauses and sticking the verb at the end is how you build these arbitrarily long, nested sentences. Der Mann, den wir gestern, als ich alle Zeitungen, die du wolltest, brachte, sahen, rennt. I personally find the version with the verb at the end more pleasing to the ear. Provided the nesting level doesn't exceed one, that ...


8

You need to ask what is being modified by the adverb and the rule is to put it as closely as possible to the modified word (or phrase). Let's start with a main clause: Ich kenne sie gut. There would be two possibilities for nicht. Either you'd like to say "It's not me who knows it well" or you'd like to say "I don't know it well". Note, in German ...


8

The German Wikipedia article on Verberststellung (that is positioning of the verb before the subject) gives three examples for this syntactical order in subordinate clauses: Konditionalsatz: Hätte ich mehr Zeit gehabt, hätte ich einen kürzeren Brief geschrieben. (Alternativ: Wenn ich mehr Zeit gehabt hätte, hätte ich...) Konzessivsatz: War der Auftritt ...


8

Das liegt daran, dass "einer Sache Herr werden" (und in der Tat nicht "Herr einer Sache werden") zu einer feststehenden Wendung geworden ist. Für mich persönlich fühlt sich das "Herr" dabei gar nicht mehr wie ein Substantiv an, sondern das gesamte Konstrukti wie "einer Sache müde werden", obwohl der grammatische Ursprung ein anderer ist. (Zuerst hatte ich ...


8

In a German "Hauptsatz" (main clause), the flexed verb goes in the second position – counting grammatical units, not words. Both of your examples follow this pattern: [Es] [ist] [eine Katze]. [Manchmal] [ist] [es] [kalt]. Frequently, but not necessarily, the subject takes the first position in a sentence, like in your first example. But ...



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