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17

Both are correct. To me, Ich esse gerne Pizza hints at a question like Was ist Dein Lieblingsessen, whereas Ich esse Pizza gern would be more appropriate as an answer to Magst Du Pizza? That is, I would put the important word (the one carrying new information) at the end of the phrase.


14

Welcome to GL&U! Your sentence uses a double infinitive forming the perfect tense in a dependent / subordinate clause. That sounds kind of complicated, but break it down into its smaller parts and then put it back together (I did also find an English page for you that further explains some of these peculiarities). First, recognize that a subordinate or ...


14

Beispiele für Postpositionen: dem Ende entgegen der Einfachheit halber der Kinder wegen … Und dann gibt es auch noch die Zirkumposition: „um des Friedes willen“


12

Putting "bitte" at the end is grammatically correct but it is not the usual place where Germans put it to be polite. As phant0m already pointed out you will put more emphasis on your request by doing so. This makes it almost a demand and therefore takes away some of the politeness that may have been intended. If you put "bitte" at the end of the sentence it ...


8

dem Alter entsprechend Gerüchten zufolge tu's mir zuliebe Dazu auch halber, entgegen, entlang, gegenüber und wegen... Wikipedia zufolge.


8

The correct version of your sentence would be Ich gehe abends an meine Uni, um Deutsch zu lernen. It means that you usually go to the university in the evening. This could be a simple statement or an answer to Wann gehst du zur Uni, um Deutsch zu lernen? (When do you go to the university to learn German?) You could also use this word order Abends ...


8

You definately have to get used to it :). Anyway, when I observe myself I have to say that I can anticipate the second verb most of the time. In your example I would assume sprechen as soon as I hear Deutsch. If I knew the person and we are talking in a context of languages anyway I would probably know by the gut. This is mainly because I have heard this ...


8

In German, using subordinate clauses and sticking the verb at the end is how you build these arbitrarily long, nested sentences. Der Mann, den wir gestern, als ich alle Zeitungen, die du wolltest, brachte, sahen, rennt. I personally find the version with the verb at the end more pleasing to the ear. Provided the nesting level doesn't exceed one, that ...


7

Die beiden Kurzvarianten sind Infinitivkonstruktionen, die aber streng genommen grammatikalisch unvollständig sind: es fehlt jeweils das Subjekt. Aus der Infinitivkonstruktion folgt, dass das Verb am Schluss steht (sogenannter "Spannsatz"); daher entspricht Variante A eher dem Sprachgefühl und lässt sich ohne weiteres zu einem kompletten Satz ergänzen: ...


7

No, it's a subordinate clause within a subordinate clause, and in both clauses the verb comes last. For the first sentence, the possible choices are: Ich finde, dass, wenn man zu viel redet, man nicht genug hört. Ich finde, dass man, wenn man zu viel redet, nicht genug hört. Ich finde, dass man nicht genug hört, wenn man zu viel redet. For the second ...


6

seufzen machen is the correct one. Here's the German version of your poem with some minor grammar corrections: Ja, das Mädchen konnt' Männer seufzen machen. Denn die Lorelei war ein solches Mädchen. Und sie war eine, für die Männer gerne sterben. Sie war die schöne Lorelei.


6

Du hast recht: Beide Sätze sind richtig. Allerdings liegt der Fokus beim Satz Die Kinder sind fröhlich, weil die Ferien heute beginnen. eher auf der Tatsache, dass sie eben genau heute beginnen. Durch diesen Satzbau wirkt es für mich als Leser so, als sei das Temporaladverb der wichtige Teil. Die Kinder sind fröhlich, weil heute die Ferien ...


6

Depends... If "also" is used as an adverb it doesn't change anything. Das ist das Geheimnis. Das ist also das Geheimnis. But it can also be used as a conjunctive adverb (Konjunktionaladverb) to start a sentence and then the same rules apply as for the other conjunctive adverbs: Es gefällt mir, also werde ich es kaufen. Es gefällt mir, deshalb ...


6

Both forms are grammatically correct. However, the first one sounds more natural to me (as a native speaker). I would guess the reason is focus. Since jemand is not specific, it is odd to put focus on it. This is what the second version does. Things would look different if the sentence were Glücklicherweise hat Maria mich hereingelassen (and not Hans). ...


6

Basically, the position of an adverb can change the meaning of the sentence. This is true for any language. Here's an example for only. Only he lent me five cents. (= He and nobody else lent me five cents.) He only lent me five cents. (= He only lent me the money, he didn’t do anything else.) He lent me only five cents. (= He didn’t lend me more ...


6

Your second sentence is not correct in german. But … In your first sentence, auch refers to what adjectives could describe you. Ich bin intelligent und schnell. Ich bin auch groß. However, this syntax can also be used for the following purpose: In your third sentence, Auch refers to who is tall. John ist groß. Auch ich bin groß.


5

Correct are Ich mag gern(e) Schnee. (without the der, if you want to place an article there, it would be den, but it's ugly) Ich trinke gern(e) Kaffee. Ich will gern(e) nach Deutschland in den Urlaub fahren. or Ich will gern(e) in den Urluab nach Deutschland fahren. (but the first solution is way better). Generally, gerne is lovelier ...


5

Without abends, the main clause of your sentence is Ich gehe an meine Uni. You want to say that you do this in the evening, so you have to put abends into this main clause. splattne already answered that you can put abends after the verb, and then add the subordinate clause: Ich gehe abends an meine Uni, um Deutsch zu lernen. You could also put ...


5

It depends. When you want to express that pizza is your favourite meal you can say: Ich esse gern Pizza. When you admit that you would be happy to eat pizza, e.g. that has already been ordered or served, you would say: Ich esse Pizza gern. In the first case, I would prefer "gerne" instead of "gern".


5

I do not know neither rule nor reference but: so is an adverb or a Gradpartikel in this case while solches is an adjective and as such it has to get the same endings any other adjective would get in that situation. It is also possible to say: Solch ein Mädchen... That sounds nicer and less mundane than the same with so. Generally, case and gender ...


5

I wouldn't trust this TeKaMoLo rule too much. It is often "wrong". If anything, it is good advice but I can write down pages and pages and pages of examples where it does not apply. So it is not a rule that is broken. It is a "most likely" scenario. Generally, German word order follows this rule: "The more relevant the later" You can replace immer with ...


5

It is very common especially in written German, in spoken language one would use a construction with a subordinate clause: Ein Umriss, der durch Kontrast oder meist Linien erzielt wird. Your rewritten sentences are all wrong. Let me try to explain you why, without using a lot of fancy grammatical terms (because I don't know them, maybe someone can add ...


5

Das "Problem" besteht darin, dass man semantisch das zwar auch auf den zweiten Teilsatz anwenden könnte. Das wird deutlich, wenn man die ersten beiden Teile einfach umdreht. Zwar vermisse ich einen dreiecken Hut und dieser Hut hat drei Ecken, aber das ist nicht mein Hut. Daher wirkt auf den ersten Blick die Inversion akzeptabel. Warum es aber zugleich ...


4

I had a question related to that. It's one of the aspects of the German language that may be strange for foreign people learning it - sometimes you don't know the meaning of the sentence until you reach the end - or even worse, the meaning is different before you reach it. I guess you know the German rock band Rammstein and their famous song Du hast: ...


4

The point with your example is "Auto" means two totally different things in each of your examples: In the first example it means 'you like to drive a car' in more general context like 'I like to drive in cars in general (even on the back seat)' The second example means 'You like to drive this car.' Another example would be: Ich esse gerne Nudeln. ...


4

Zur Stellung von "nicht" als nicht-kontrastierende Verneinung finden wir folgene Regel: Wenn nicht als nicht kontrastierende, pauschale Verneinung verwendet wird, hat es die Tendenz weit hinten im Satz zu stehen.Canoo Diese Regel wird im aufgeführten Beispiel eingehalten: Vergiss den Reisepass nicht. Stellt man das nicht vor den Reisepass so ...


4

My understanding is that an adverb would occupy the first position by itself if it is what is known as a "sentence adverb," i.e. one that modifies the verb. Schnell bin ich die Treppen hinaufgegangen. = I went up the stairs quickly. But if the adverb is modifying something other than the verb, it occupies the position along with that other word. ...


4

The correct version is the second: Ich will es dir zeigen When the objects are pronominalized (personal pronouns, not demonstrative ones) the Akkusativobjekt usually goes before the Dativ. Quelle: http://www.canoo.net/services/OnlineGrammar/Satz/Wortstellung/Stellungsfeld/Mittelfeld/Objekt.html


4

As a conjunction or as an adverb, so is sometimes translated as so in German. In your case, however, it's an interjection, which is used after a short pause; here to pick up the topic again in order to pose a further question. As a interjection it is always translated as also (which is never translated as also from German to English). In German it's not ...



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