Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

This sentence seems to be spoken German and in spoken German you don't analyse whether the subject is the same or not. As "um zu + infinitive" and "damit" both express purpose in spoken language can occur "damit" where the speaker would use "um zu" when he would write the sentence. In spoken language not all rules you can find in DAF textbooks are strictly ...


2

I think the rule is more like "if the subjects are different, you can't use 'um ... zu', and you must use 'damit'". I can come up with multiple examples where the subjects are the same, and one could use either "damit" or "um ... zu". In your example, "damit" is more natural. It emphasizes that it's a goal, and not a more or less natural consequence.


1

As Emanuel said, the trick is: The more important an aspect is, the later (i.e., the more towards the end of the sentence) it’s mentioned. This is correct for all unmarked sentences. On a grammatically point of view, your sentences are fine as well, but you have to be aware that your sentence has a marked word order. This means your putting focus on a ...


1

You can perfectly translate word for word: I know, it appears odd. Ich weiß, es erscheint seltsam. I = Ich know = weiß it = es appears = erscheint odd = seltsam Hopefully it is what you where looking for. Otherwise, the answers ot the others look pretty well too.


7

Put the comma in and you're perfectly fine. Ich weiß, es erscheint seltsam. It's two sentences: 'ich weiß' and 'es erscheint seltsam'. Two main clauses linked by a comma, the verb goes in second place both times.


1

The verb "geben" usually comes with two object, a thing given and an entity given to. You can technically skip one or even both object but you need a REALLY good context for it. If it is just an isolated sentence it will appear as if there's something missing to most people. Unsere Beziehung ist aus der Ballance. Du nimmst. Ich gebe. (both objects ...


1

If you really, really wanted to say "I pass on the flower that a woman gave to me" using only the words in your example, then you would have to say Ich gebe die Rose einer Frau. And then you would almost certainly be misunderstood, because using 'geben' without a direct object is very uncommon, and the genitive you are using is exactly the same form ...


0

The sentence in the newspaper sounds more smooth than the alternative, which requires the word "aber". The contrast between what is described in the two subclauses is automatic.


1

Mit der besonderen Wortstellung in "Waren es zunächst nur..." weiß man sofort, dass ein gegensätzlicher Satz folgt. Das Gleiche kann man auch mit einer Nebensatzeinleitung machen, aber ohne Konjunktion und mit Inversion ist der Satz schneller/kürzer. Ein stilistisches Mittel der Satzverkürzung.


0

In the written language the bolded sentence by Frankfurter Allgemeine is correct. But it's only used in the written language, no German would ever talk like this. But it is typical for a text where something is reported to the reader. Beginning the sentence with Es waren zunächst kaum … is a bad writing style because the previous sentence already ...


8

The German Wikipedia article on Verberststellung (that is positioning of the verb before the subject) gives three examples for this syntactical order in subordinate clauses: Konditionalsatz: Hätte ich mehr Zeit gehabt, hätte ich einen kürzeren Brief geschrieben. (Alternativ: Wenn ich mehr Zeit gehabt hätte, hätte ich...) Konzessivsatz: War der Auftritt ...


0

Interesting question. Being a native German speaker I don't realize that this is even worth raising a question. Both is correct, of course. I'd say it's just a matter of style. It sounds more fluent to me within the given context. With „Es war“ at the beginning of the previous sentence a repetition by „Es waren“ is avoided. Additionally, with "Es waren" at ...


3

Let's consider the two possibilities: (1) Hätten die Kommunisten die Versorgung gekappt, die Sache wäre entschieden gewesen. (2) Hätten die Kommunisten die Versorgung gekappt, wäre die Sache entschieden gewesen. There is no doubt that version (2) is a correct sentence consisting of a main clause followed by a subordinate clause. Personally, I would ...


-1

Actually both is correct. But the sentence Der Spiegel used is the same like und die Sache wäre entschieden gewesen But you can leave the und away. Might just be easier to understand with und. Also their example is commonly used as kind of conclusion, a consequence. Hope I could help



Top 50 recent answers are included