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0

Zu den konkreten Beispielen: A1 ist grammatisch (nicht negiert kritisch). A2 ist ungrammatisch. B1 ist grammatisch (nicht negiert mit einem Sieg; alternativ kann man auch mit einem Sieg gerechnet als die von nicht negierte Verbgruppe auffassen). B2 ist ebenfalls grammatisch (nicht negiert die Verbgruppe haben gerechnet). Es ist immer riskant, die Grammatik ...


2

Both translations are sentences, that no native speaker would use. Ich gucke TV abends. First thing to note is, that the verb »gucken« is not used in the complete German spoken Area. It is unusual in Austria, and - as I guess - also in Bavaria, but since I live in Austria I can't say much about the usage in different areas or Germany or Switzerland. But ...


1

Nicht kann zwei Funktionen erfüllen: es negiert ein direkt darauf folgendes Adjektiv oder Substantiv; oder es negiert das Verb des Satzes. Im ersten Fall muss es direkt vor dem Adjektiv stehen: Die Bevölkerung ist meistens nicht kritisch. Nicht bezieht sich hier relativ eindeutig auf das kritsch. Der Satz ist quasi positiv formuliert, und schreibt ...


4

The Yandex version is badly wrong. It replaced the verb fernsehen with the noun Fernsehen, either meaning the process of watching TV or the TV itself. Google probably chose the structure it did because it doesn’t translate idiomatically but rather literally, and that option is more literal (but less idiomatic). The verb fernsehen, as you noticed, is ...


0

There aren’t many. It is important to keep the finite verb in second position of a main clause (and in last position of a subordinate clause). If the verb is in any way composite, i.e. one of the following: a tense composed of two parts such as perfect or future followed by an infinitive construction of any kind separable (weggehen, fortfahren, aufessen, ...


-3

Die Funktion von "nicht" ist, ein Adjektiv oder Verb, welches darauf folgt, ins Gegenteil zu verkehren. Wenn auf "nicht" nichts folgt, ist das grammatikalisch falsch. Das B2 ist deshalb wirklich korrekt, und es unterscheidet sich von B1 dadurch, dass das unerwartete des Sieges in B2 stärker betont wird.


9

The sentence is correct. While it is much more common to have the verb at the end, in this particular case there is an emphasis on the need to return, while the destination is rather a side information. This can be expressed by using this word order. One can find examples of such phrases on Google books, e.g. here and here. It looks like even Goethe used ...


10

Neither sentence is wrong. German word order is rather flexible, and while there is a tendency to have the second part of a split verb at the end, it isn't always the case. Possible reasons for pulling it to the front include improved understandability (when the intervening part would be long) and putting emphasis on a specific part of the sentence. In this ...


4

The rule is not if there is an ‘und’ keep the word order unchanged. Rather, the rule is put the verb at the end of a subordinate clause and in second position in main clauses. The thing about und and oder is that they cannot only connect two (otherwise unconnected) main clauses, but can also do that with subordinate clauses. Ich habe gesagt, dass du mir ...


1

It is the first one. Sollten relates to both of the subordinate clauses, so it has to stand at the end. But nevertheless it is not correctly formulated. You can't say “Eltern ihren Kindern Beispiel geben sollten”, you have to say something like: Man muss auch anmerken, dass Eltern ihren Kindern ein Vorbild sein und Alkohol nur gemäßigt ...


1

You seem to be having a pretty good idea of what goes where. Werden, being the finite verb, needs to occupy the second position, and sends erlauben to the end of the sentence. The infinitive construction, however, is required to be even behind the verb at the end, in the so-called Nachfeld. There are two possible ways of saying to watch TV; you seem to be ...


0

For translating complex sentences to German an always heplful approach is to chunk the original into logical sentence parts. This is where we human beings always will be better than any robot translator. We can then work on the individual parts much better (and even a machine translation will give us better results for the chunks). My parents... ... ...


1

Word order in German sentences is almost entirely free. The main constraint is the verb being in second position (although some conjunctions occupy the zero-position, forcing the verb to an effective third, counting the conjunction) and the Verbklammer to be picked up at the end. Some orders, while possible, are less likely, others add emphasis from minute ...


2

As a German mother tongue speaker, the following permutations sound natural to me: Eine Krähe war mit mir aus der Stadt gezogen. Mit mir war eine Krähe aus der Stadt gezogen. Aus der Stadt war eine Krähe mit mir gezogen. Aus der Stadt war mit mir eine Krähe gezogen. Aus der Stadt gezogen war mit mir eine Krähe. The difference seems to be one of ...


2

Well, there is this rule... of course there is a rule for that :) The ones studying German calls it TE-KA-MO-LO, that describes how the sentence should be built. That first should go temporal part, then causal, then modal (your ex: mit mir) and lastly comes the location describing part (your ex: aus der Stadt). Have a look: ...


4

The most commonly used form would be Ich gehe gern einkaufen. You could also say Gern gehe ich einkaufen. which would emphasize "gern", but in most contexts this would sound a bit strange. Another alternative is Einkaufen gehe ich gern. which would emphasize that you like going shopping, but not something else - the sentence somehow ...


4

I assume that the title was changed for purely poetic reasons. The original English title has a regular meter (unstressed, stressed, unstressed, stressed, ...), but the literal translation into German "Die sehr hungrige Raupe" does not. By choosing the less literal translation "Die kleine Raupe Nimmersatt" (i.e, "the little caterpillar Always-Hungry"), it ...


11

To be precise, "Die kleine Raupe Nimmersatt" doesn't translate to "The very hungry caterpillar". The English title is the original one, and the German one is a translation. I'd say the translator allowed himself a certain degree of freedom, as it is common in literature. "Nimmersatt" is a nice word to express "very hungry" very concisely. In fact, it goes ...


2

The trick is in the word Nimmersatt, which translates to "always hungry"; but in this case is also the name of the caterpillar. Klein, of course, means small and is the adjective to Raupe. The German title doesn't use or need the very, because that's implicitly in the name of Nimmersatt. Your translation "The little caterpillar Hungry" is literally ...


2

Do relative clauses have to follow the word they are describing? No! See the following: Ich sage Ihnen, dass das Pferd, das ich gesehen habe, lahm ist. Ich sage Ihnen, dass das Pferd lahm ist, das ich gesehen habe. Is there a rule for verb order in subordinate clauses apart from having the verb last? Semi-no! Testing prompted me to actually allow ...


3

Expanding on Em1’s answer I was bored and did a sentence order count in one random long post of an Austrian on this site known for his long and detailed answers. I only counted main clauses. The ‘standard’ subject-verb sentence, where subject is first, verb is second and I didn’t care what followed then, (SV_) occurred 23 times (including two sub-headers). ...


3

You can hardly say what the more popular word order is because you change word order for different reasons. Sometimes grammar requires you to swap words, sometimes it's just for the purpose of emphasis. However, the 'standard' word-order (what you'll learn in school first) is: S-P-O Er geht ins Wohnzimmer. Er macht den Fernseher an. If you use main ...


3

In German, the position of the (conjugated) verb has a grammatical function: In regular sentences, the verb is at the second position. In subclauses, the verb is at the end. In questions or commands, the verb is in first position – possibly preceded by a question or politeness particle. In your example, er ist schön is the main clause and obwohl er alt ...



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