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1

Correct is: Ich glaube , dass (subordinating conjunction) es (subject) einen Hund ("direct object") gibt (verb). Pertaining to OP's comment on the question: This "es" is not to be confused with the "es" we see in sentences like the following: Es wird in Deutschland viel Bier getrunken. Es muss mindestens einer von euch hier bleiben. In ...


0

construction "sagt man" is used when form question with or without "W-Frage". Example: Sagt man etwas? or Wie sagt man?


5

Overly simplified: Sagt man "X"? is the word order used to create a question. Man sagt "X". Is a statement. The first word order is also used in constructions with subordinate clauses Wenn man jemanden begrüßen möchte, sagt man "Guten Tag".


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The sentence consists of 3 activities (2 of which are phrased as obligations): sich auf die Strecke wagen Tribut zollen müssen (can be used without a Dative object) abbrechen müssen (can be used intransitively) The subject for all 3 verbs is "Bromeis". The tense is past, indicated using the perfect tense. Here are the simplified sentences: Bromeis hat ...


1

Let’s try to order the sentence: You can divide the sentence in two parts: main and sub-sentence. Main: Vor zwei Jahren hatte sich Bromeis erstmals auf die 1238 Kilometer lange Strecke gewagt, Sub: nach knapp 400 Kilometern aber den Belastungen Tribut zollen und abbrechen müssen. In this case, the sub-sentence contains further information about ...


5

It's not a continuation of the first part, it's just that the two repeated parts ("Bromeis hatte", subject and auxiliary) are left out in the second part. Also, the subject is "Bromeis". The reflexive pronoun counts as a (dative or accusative) object, and is never part of the subject. So the full sentence is: Bromeis hatte nach knapp 400 Kilometern aber ...


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You're right principally. This continuation of the first clause should respect the reflectiveness startet there, which it doesn't. But this sentence is cramped with high density information that a low information density aspect such as reflectiveness will be forgotten, once you are midway through the second clause. I had to read the sentence thrice to even ...


2

This is one of the cases of the "blurry edge" of prefix verbs. If we consider "mit" to be part of "mitkommen", then @Carlster is correct. The "zur Party" would be in the Nachfeld. However, it is arguable, even doubt-worthy that "mit" is part of the verb. We can see that in past tense. Sie ist zur Party mitgekommen. (Verb: mitkommen) Sie ist mit zur ...


2

Conjunctions cannot follow the verb in German. It actually one of the defining features that they don't. The "aber" in your example is no conjunction. It is an adverb. "Bei aber im Mittelfeld handelt es sich um ein Konjunktionaladverb..." (Source: "Duden, Die Grammatik" 8. Auflage, Seite 623) It has the same position as other adverbs that express ...


2

This is a nice question! The example demonstrates the combination of two substantive clauses („Satzzusammenziehung“), in combination with an ellipsis of the personal pronoun „ich“. Moving the „aber“ into the „Mittelfeld“ of the sentence is not a matter of style. It is not a a special case for the position of the finite verb. Rather, it's a matter of ...


2

[...], bin aber leider krank. [...], aber ich bin leider krank. The purpose of the first form is probably to save a word (ich), since "[...]aber bin leider krank." sounds a bit strange or at least very colloquial. But these two forms of course express exactly the same.


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When pulling the second part of a separable verb to the front, everything that remains on the right becomes the Nachfeld (afterfield or post-field) of a sentence. I think this is called right dislocation in English. Hätte sie mehr Zeit, käme sie mit zur Party. Not everything can be in the afterfield of a sentence, most importantly, the subject cannot ...



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