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7

Der Satz ist ein Zitat aus Goethes Hermann und Dorothea. Es steht im dritten Gesang Thalia. Den Volltext kann man im Projekt Gutenberg online lesen. Ich habe nicht das Ganze gelesen, aber den Ausschnitt der näheren Umgebung. Es fällt auf, dass alles im Hexameter gehalten ist, wobei das Versmaß weder streng in Trochäen noch streng in Daktylen gehalten ist – ...


7

As usual, it depends on context: Colloquially, you may use Penner to refer to homeless people, maybe even without much degradation. It’s also used as a rather “friendly” insult, especially when referring to a run-down, worn-out appearance. Calling your hung-over, unwashed pal lovingly Penner is generally accepted. In formal (and even standard) context, ...


7

As stated in the comments the literal translation refers to a homeless person. The reasons it became an insult are probably because of the prejudices that people have against them. I dont really know the situation in other countries, but here in Germany when you think about a "Penner" you basically associate them with being kinda dirty, having drug problems ...


6

The most common translation is indeed "Es ist/Das ist": This is awesome -> Das ist fantastisch This is my story -> Das ist meine Geschichte or the somewhat more generalized version with "Es ist", referencing a given state/situation: This is ridiculous -> Es ist lächerlich This is awkward -> Es ist (mir) peinlich However, you can ...


6

As noted in the other answers and by yourself, the word Penner means homeless person and can be used as an insult. The interesting fact, however, is what Penner literally means: It is derived from the verb pennen, which is a colloquial term for schlafen, i.e. to sleep. Hence, Penner could translate to sleeper - probably to describe someone sleeping ...


5

Yes, Penner is a derogatory term a priori. It derives from the slang verb pennen for sleeping (schlafen) and the initial meaning is thus someone who sleeps a lot. As it is often the case with slang words, they are not considered nice or formal and can carry the insult with them even when used ‘neutrally’. The word is commonly used for homeless people ...


4

You could say "Dies ist lächerlich" but that sounds very unnatural and ridiculous. You can say "Das ist lächerlich" or "Das ist meine Geschichte". This sounds perfectly natural.


4

In computing, both the English parameter and the German Parameter mean something that the user can set up to change the behavior of a program, e.g. command line parameters (arguments). I do not know any usage of parameter that uses it in a read-only way. This is usually meant by properties or similar words.


4

It depends on what you want to express. If you have a theft insurance (legal protection) and want to mention that, you can say: Unser neuer Wagen ist gegen Diebstahl versichert. However, if you want to talk about security equipment (physical protection, like a special alarm system), you can say: Unser neuer Wagen ist vor/gegen Diebstahl geschützt. ...


4

This sounds a little too literally translated from English and a little clunky. I would rather say in German: Es ist eine beeindruckende Fähigkeit eine andere Sprache zu sprechen. The literal translation of to have sounds very not German.


3

It is hard to translate directly and the meaning in both sentences is a bit different. The first sentence would best be translated as "But the trend to wear stylish headgear persits." In German "Der Trend zu/zur/zum s.th." is used like some sort of synonym, shortening the sentence by hiding the verb which will be conveyed by the context and only using the ...


3

Das Wort zurück ist entstanden aus der Verbindung der Präposition zu mit dem Substantiv Rücken. Das End-n in Rücken ist dabei eine relativ junge Entwicklung, und so lautete die mittelhochdeutsche Vorgängerform ze rucke. Im Neuhochdeutschen ist dies als zurück und zurücke angekommen, wobei sich letztlich die apokopierte Form zurück durchgesetzt hat. Diese ...


2

You use "Jahren", when you put a preposition to it: "In zwei Jahren", "Nach fünf Jahren", "Vor neun Jahren". There is also an exception. When you talking about one year, you still use "Jahre": "In einem Jahr", "vor einem Jahr", "nach einem Jahr".


1

The straight and simple explanation: worden is used to build a passive voice form of some verb in the past geworden is used to build a past tense form of the verb werden it self Example: The passive voice in the past: It was built. = Es ist gebaut worden. but the conjugation of werden (to become) in the past (indicative): It has got dark. = Es ...


1

Rules of thumb When forming German sentences as a native English speaker: Use hier for here and da for there. When targeting a high register, sometimes dort is better than da when it is emphasised. When there is any kind of doubt whether to use da or one of hier, dort, always prefer da. When making sense of German utterings as a native English speaker: ...


1

In addition to the previous answer, which takes care of the distinction of the three words with respect to each other, I though I'd add some detail to "da" being used synonymously with "here". I have seen "da" many times in contexts when I would have used "hier" That's an absolutely correct observation. Basically, "da" in colloquial speech, when ...


1

Short and simple: Normally it refers to a homeless person but in fact it is an common insult. If your friend calls you "Penner", you should probably take this as insult. If your teacher talks about "Penner", he probably means a homeless person. (Normally the teacher wouldn't say "Penner".) In German most sentences depend on the person and ...



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