Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

The German verb has to come second. The first position can be filled with whatever. Thus the phrase "gibt es" can totally be part of statements Es gibt in Berlin gute Bäcker. In Berlin gibt es gute Bäcker. As the other answer already mentions, "Gibt es" is the order you'll find in questions. Gibt es in Berlin gute Bäcker? AND it can be also ...


6

An example where only one of the options is appropriate: Shuffling a deck of cards is always "mischen", never "vermischen". As a rule of thumb use "mischen" on countable sets and "vermischen" when the result is homogenous. Beware: "mixing a drink" is neither: the correct translation is "einen Drink mixen".


5

Wenn, dann wäre es: Ich sehe den Mann, von dem das Buch rot ist. aber dass man es machen kann heißt nicht, dass man es soll. Im Gegenteil: Wann immer einem diese Von-Nutzung bewusst wird sollte man stattdessen den Genitiv nutzen. Der Mann, von dem das Buch rot ist, könnte auch eher der Autor sein.


5

There can be many alternatives -- Some examples: Something like getting ready for a party Wenn meine Schwester sich für die Party zurecht macht, braucht sie Stunden. Or maybe to put on some color/make up Wenn meine Schwester Farbe/Make up auflegt, dauert es Stunden. Or just something like getting beautyful: Meine Schwerster braucht ...


5

"mit Stil" or "sehr stilvoll" are both possible. I'm not sure though if in English the phrase "with style" also has a strong connotation to elegant, as it does in German. "stilisch" is not a proper German word. You either mean the English word "stylish" that is used a lot by young Germans or the word "stilistisch", which would translate to "stylistic".


4

Behüten as a noun is very rarely used. For my ears it sounds a little old and over sophisticated. Better use something like auf meine Kinder aufpassen or um meine Kinder kümmern. So in this sentence that would be An Silvester war ich sehr beschäftigt damit, auf meine Kinder aufzupassen und aufzuräumen. or even better An Silvester hatte ich alle Hände ...


4

In the context you gave, your translation is perfectly right. However, there is a subtle difference between wissen and erinnern. The latter would imply that you can recall the precise memory from your mind including enough detail to replay substantial parts of the topical event. For wissen, it suffices to know the event happened (perhaps by remembering some ...


4

To give some context, it could be in contrast to the well known phrase "Haste was, biste was" = "Hast du was, [dann] bist du was" = "if you have [stuff], then you are something" = "Wealth bestows status". In contrast, "Haste nichts, dann machste halt was" = "Hast Du nichts, dann machst du halt was" = "if you have nothing, you just do something". "Haste ...


3

I would rather say Ja, und ich habe es [dort] genossen Es refers to the time which was spent there. You could also say: Ja, und es hat mir [dort] gefallen. If you want to set the focus on the city, use the following sentence: Ja, und die Stadt hat mir gefallen.


3

I usually use Veröffentlichung zurückziehen as tooltip for icons, because the text is lenghty. It translates to revoke publication. A shorter option might be verstecken, which is not semantically correct (means hide), but is the shortest coresponding word I can think of.


2

I would only add to the current answers the probable answers to the question "Weißt du noch?": Ich weiß nicht mehr. is what what Germans would say if they don't (can't) remember (anymore). Ja, weiß ich. means in this context Yey, I (do) remember. It doesn't happen very often that a German would like to be genau with the subtlety of the difference between ...


2

another example: „I [still] KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER“ (dt. „Ich weiß [noch], was Du letzten Sommer getan hast“) The question should be "What is the difference between 'to know' and 'to remember'?". I think http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remember_versus_know_judgements gives an idea about the difference. And maybe the above-mentioned example helps you ...


2

In addition to the excellent answers, I'd just like to remark that this is peculiarity - to put it bluntly - of English, rather than German. Most other Western European languages that I know make a difference between the meanings of "to know" as in "to are aware of the existence of..." and "to have learnt ..."; for example kennen / können (German), kennen / ...


2

In general, you can use every verb as a noun in certain contexts in German. The nominal character of nominalised verbs becomes clearer if you use definite articles. Furthermore, in your case, i would use Hüten instead of Behüten: An Sylvester war ich mit Aufräumen und (dem) Hüten meiner Kinder sehr beschäftigt.


2

The common explanation you can find in books is that we're looking at a Satznegation" (whole sentence negation) as opposed to a "Satzteilnegation" (part of sentence negation). I don't find that particularly helpful. Nor does it mirror the underlying structures. So here's my somewhat unorthodox explanation. The fundamental rule of negation is that "nicht" is ...


2

In this question, we deal with what information is exactly negated by "nicht". The information in "Er liest das Buch nicht" is: What is (not) done with the book: it is read What is (not) read: the book Compare the following examples: Ex.1: "Er liest das Buch nicht - er hält es in der Hand." -> He isn't reading the book - he's holding it in his ...


1

Definitely "es", as all cities are neutral, even when the name is a compound ending in -burg , -berg, etc. (das Hamburg, das Heidelberg) To give a few more examples: Das Hamburg, aus dem Benedikt die Flucht ins Jenseits antrat, war eine Art hoffnungsloser Vorposten im wilden Wikinger-Land. [Die Zeit, 07.07.2005] Das Frankfurt der Jahreswende 1828 / 29, ...


1

This depends on the case of the following noun. The preposition in demands accusative or dative. in + dative The preposition has the form im incorporating the article dem. Ich gehe im Park spazieren. in + accusative The preposition keeps the form in not incorporating the article den. Ich gehe in den Park, um Martin zu treffen.


1

Ich möchte in meiner Antwort erstmal weiter an den Aussagen in meinen Kommentaren festhalten (es wird sehr wohl für positive Rückmeldungen verwendet), dann allerdings auch einräumen, dass ich verstehen kann, woher das Gefühl kommt, dass es eher für negative Aussage verwendet würde (was wirklich nicht so ist). Erst einmal ist allerdings, als Interjektion ...


1

In der tat verwenden wir die Antwort "allerdings" häufiger im negativen als im positiven. Das liegt aber nicht daran, dass es eine Regel gäbe, die besagt, dass "allerdings" nicht im positiven verwendet werden dürfe. Die Ungebräuchlichkeit entsteht viel mehr dadurch, dass wir dazu neigen negative Kommentare kürzer und bündiger formulieren, um unsere ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible