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1

Nouns and articles are conjugated according to the grammatical case we use. In your example the appropriate cases are: Die Frau (Nominative) isst den Apfel (Accusative). Still, grammatically it is possible to use different cases in order to express a different action: Die Frau (Accusative) isst der Apfel (Nominative) = the woman is being eaten by ...


1

They are not the same, but related. The answer is that the articles "der, die, das" are declined. You might have a look at the explanantion here (I don't know of any easier right now). In your example the line "Die Frau isst den Apfel" is the correct one. The article of "der Apfel" would change again if we would say "Die Frau ist den Kern des Apfels" (the ...


3

While they are generally mostly the same, "Entschuldigen Sie, [bitte]..." is orders of magnitude more polite than "Entschuldigung...". You will normally use the former if you want something from the other person, such as when asking for the way or asking for a small favor. The single word "Entschuldigung" is not truly impolite, but it is much closer to ...


8

It depends. If you directly address a person, you'd use Entschuldigen (not: Entschuldigung) Sie. Yes, if you are not on familiar terms with them you'll usually use Sie, i.e. the polite form. (The usual exceptions, like students among each other, fellow sports(wo)men, adults addressing small children etc. apply, of course. The corresponding du-form would be ...


0

Das kann man ganz einfach mit Fehloptimierung übersetzen. Überleg mal, was der Spruch eigentlich besagen will: »Premature optimization = root of all evil.« Da kommt ein neunmalkluger Juniorentwickler und frickelt sich ewig einen ab, um irgendeine völlig randständige und bedeutungslose Stelle zu tunen … Bringt am Ende nix außer mehr Komplexität. Ist also ...


1

Beside the already mentioned Wikipedia article I found Wieselwort on WkiMANNia, which also contains a list of examples. I can also recommend (particularly when you are interested in clear language) reading Deutsch für Profis by Wolf Schneider. He doesn't use the word "Wieselwort", but in the first 5 chapters he critizes deceptive use of German language by ...


0


4

Das ist richtig: Schweigen ist intransitiv, deshalb: "Ich schweige". Aber es gibt auch die transitive Variante (wie übrigens bei vielen Verben) etw. verschweigen. Zum Beispiel: Er hat das verschwiegen.


4

Da das Originalzitat ("premature optimazation is the root of all evil") auf Englisch ist, gibt es keine festen etablierten Begriff (zumindest kenne ich keinen), nur Übersetzungen oder das Original (Informatiker reden sowieso viel Englisch). "Vorzeitig" und "verfrüht" sind mir in diesem Zusammenhang als übliche Übersetzungen bekannt. "Übereifrig" und ...


0

If you go by the wikipedia entry that comes up when searching for premature optimization, there is no established word yet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_optimization This means it is a "Fachbegriff" which originated in a foreign language and should be used. In this case your colleague/friend should search for premature optimization. Why? The ...


0

The answer is way simpler: "Tschüss" is rather uncommon in Southern Germany. I believe your observation was coincidental: Whenever you said "tschüss" and back came a ciao, you were talking to a Southern German. In the opposite case, you were talking to a Northern German, while you were trying to speak like a Southern German. Generally: "Tschüss" is rarer ...


1

Personal preferences and local habits influence which variant of tschüs is chosen: tschüß – long /ü/ tschüss – short /ü/ tschü tschö, tschö wa … tschau, ciao tschüßi, tschüssi tschühüß tschüßikowski tüdelü tschautschau, ciao ciao atschüs adieu, adjö ade … It may happen, as you seem to have experienced, that out of two common options, people choose the ...


0

I think "Ergebnis" is used mainly for intended consequences/results, while "Folge" is used more for unintended consequences (which may explain what's observation that is is most often used for negative consequences: Usually negative consequences are unintended, while people like to claim positive consequences of their actions as intended, even if they didn't ...


2

One possible circumvention would be to use the following formulation: Wenn du jemanden mit dem Familiennamen Frigon kennenlernst, dann kann diese Person aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach ihre Wurzeln bis nach Neufrankreich zurückverfolgen. As others have noted in the comments, this implies the feminine (grammatical) gender, and some may thus not see it as ...


1

"Der Tote", "der Verstorbene" refer to a person who is unfortunately dead. "Die Leiche", "der Leichnam" refers to the physical remains. "Der Tote" is not necessarily a corpse. For example, people killed in an explosion with no corpse left. Same for "der Verstorbene". You wouldn't use this word for someone dying in an explosion, only for natural / ...


2

Folge is mostly used to illustrate negative, unwanted consequences. If you look up "Folge" in the Duden, you will notice that all (!) examples under the relevant first meaning are of negative consequences: unangenehme, verhängnisvolle, katastrophale, schwerwiegende Folgen die zwangsläufige Folge [davon] war, dass sie sich vollends verschloss die ...


0

Vorsicht vor falschen Dichotomien! Wie so oft versuchen die Teilnehmer einen Unterschied in die Bedeutung der Wörter hineinzugeheimnissen, die dort nicht ist. Es gibt in Ursache-Wirkungs-Beziehungen die Wirkung sowohl als Ergebnis als auch als Folge. Ein Unterschied existiert da nicht. Es gibt vorläufige Ergebnisse und auch endgültige Ergebnisse sind ...


-1

A "Leichnam" is a dead human body, whereas a "Leiche" can also be a dead animal.


3

Zusenden is composed of the prefix zu, in the sense of to(direction), and the verb senden, which means to send. So, the compound conveys the idea of "to send something to someone". An Email is obviously an object that you can send (to someone); thus, it fits in context quite well. Another word you could take is zuschicken. There's no difference at all1. ...


4

IMHO "Folge" (in the result-like sense) emphasizes causality or a similarly strong link. Ergebnis is often more specific, e.g. you'd say that things falling towards the center of earth is die Folge of the law of gravity. Whereas the Ergebnis of some calculation is 42. If you want to emphasize that the result is obtained by a logical sequence of thoughts: ...


5

I'd like to add that Folge has multiple meanings, e.g. episode (of TV series), sequence (math), ... Basically it's something that follows in some way. As a connotation there may be something that follows in turn, making it not final as explained in the other answers. Note the similarity of Folge and follow. This is not coincidence but due to a common ...


11

I'm a native speaker and it's actually not that difficult, even though they are quite similar. While "die Folge" is more like the consequence (so something that follows which doesn't finish it completely, like a secondary result I guess), the word "das Ergebnis" is more like a (final) outcome which finishes (for example a research) completely.


2

As a native speaker I would say that Ergebnis is a final thing and Folge means that something happens after something was done or happened. If you say "Das Ergebnis von 1+1 ist 2.", then this is a final result. Folge describes an occurring after something: Ich habe den Topf auf den Herd gestellt. Die Folge war, dass das Wasser gekocht hat. Der Film ...


6

The correct German translation of the political country "United Kingdom (of Great Britain and Northern Ireland)" is Vereinigtes Königreich (von Großbritannien und Nordirland). Both, the English Great Britain, and the German Großbritannien refer to the geographic island (as opposed to "little" Britain which is Brittany in France). However it is not ...


4

Großbritannien = Britannien The prefix "Groß-" was added for better distinction against the French "Bretagne", which was sometimes reffered to as "Britannien". So in German, Großbritannien never includes any part of Ireland. And as far as I know, the same holds for English. So whenever translating "(Great) Britain", use "Großbritannien" so people can be ...


0

Well, as far as I know, is the issue that Britannien is the island and Großbritannien is the country. Since you are writing a historical essay, I would change the country name and maybe mention it in a side note. Furthermore, the term 1600er is not very widely used in German. It is preferred to write 17. Jahrhundert. This isn't wrong, just not very ...


7

There are already the correct answers about "Förderung" or "Gewinnung" for liquid oil. But oil can also be find as Ölschiefer (Oil shale) This Ölschiefer is abgebaut, followed by the extraction of the oil. Again, there is no Abbau of the oil itself, but for the pre-product Ölschiefer.


6

No, it is only used for mining raw materials in solid state and wouldn't work for liquids or gases. Abbau literally translates to deconstruct, to take apart. It is the opposite of aufbauen, even when used metaphorically (aufbauen: build up, improve; abbauen: reduce, degrade). Both meanings don't really fit in the context of extracting liquids from the ...



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