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39

I’ve never heard or seen the word chutzpadik in German. Chuzpe, on the other hand, is well-known. It’s not a word that the average German is using in everyday speech, but it occurs occasionally, say, in newspaper articles, sometimes with, sometimes without explanation.


21

Do you know the famous Yiddish quote by Max Weinreich? A shprakh iz a dialekt mit an armey un flot. (אַ שפּראַך איז אַ דיאַלעקט מיט אַן אַרמיי און פֿלאָט) Eine Sprache ist ein Dialekt mit einer Armee und Flotte/ A language is a dialect with an army and a navy. I'd say it's a language, especially after 1945. Without citing or knowing proper linguistic ...


20

I am a historian and I had never encountered chutzpadik in German sources. I have found the word, however, in a Jüdisches Lexikon published in Berlin in 1927: Ein chuzef, auch chuzpenik oder chuzpedig = frecher Mensch and also in the 1903 issue of the Jewish magazine from Berlin Ost und West: Gotteslästerer ... chuzpedige Lümmel the latter ...


14

Yiddish (literally "Jewish", "Jiddisch" in German) is taught and used by Jewish people mainly. It is not a German school subject. I wouldn't call it a dialect like the Bavarian dialect. It is a High German language, derived from Middle High German combined with Hebrew, Aramaic and Slavic. It was used by the Ashkenazi Jews ("German Jews") living in Germany ...


14

The difference between a dialect and a language isn't a technical one; it's determined by culture, society and/or politics (cf. Danish/Swedish/Norwegian or Slovak/Czech*). Personally, I would consider Yiddish a different language, given the stark and obvious differences between the users of each language, even though as a learner of German, Yiddish is ...


12

I’m a native speaker and I have never heard that word. Perhaps it is a bit more common in other regions then the one where I have grown up and live. There are local differences concerning the vocabulary of the spoken language. But I don’t think so in this case. I think I’ve read chuzpe in a magazine once. But long story short: Chutzpadik is not a ...


9

I suppose it's connected with „Zeigermacher“ - „Uhrzeiger“ is the german word for 'watch hand'. Google gives several sources for watchmakers being called Zeigermacher, too.


8

At this time of the year an old Christmas carol from 1480 comes to my mind where "träumen" was used reflexive (i.e. "unecht reflexiv" or rather reciprocal): Und unsrer lieben Frauen der traumete ein Traum: als unter ihrem Herzen gewachsen ward ein Baum. In modern German it is only rarely used reflexive, here are a few examples: Mir ...


7

Im Grimm steht alles, auch das hier über Jauche: trübe flüssigkeit, flüssiger dünger. das wort gehört zu denen, die ihren ursprünglichen begriff verschlechtert haben; es bedeutet im 15. jahrh., wo es sich zuerst landschaftlich, mitteldeutsch und niederdeutsch, nachweisen läszt, sowie im 16., nur brühe, suppe: jus juche This translates that regionally ...


6

Indeed there is "Eingemachtes" in contemporary German. Duden defines "Eingemachtes" as follows: (in Gläsern, Dosen u. Ä. aufbewahrte) durch Einmachen, Einlegen (2) in eine Lake o. Ä. haltbar gemachte Lebensmittel (besonders Obst). Food being stored in jars, preserved by brine or another liquid conservative (esp. fruits). Today this term usually ...


6

I'm pretty sure second half is babbling, as people have suggested. The OP has given: "...haden tugagatzen kashen pichen pippin kachen." I would transliterate it a bit differently: "...heden to the gantzen kasha'n pischen pippik kachen." "Heden" isn't a word. "Kasha" (buckwheat groats) is the iconic food of poverty in Jewish culture, and it is here ...


6

Answers to your questions: It would be “Mach Nacht und geh’ schlafen” Yes, the literal translation is “Make night and go to sleep”. But: Mach Nacht makes — as the English translation — no sense. In German you would rather say “turn off the lights and go to sleep” (“Dreh’ das Licht ab und geh’ schlafen.”) or something similar.


5

There is no such thing as a standard diminutive -el in Bavarian. Even though I'm from Bavaria I'm not an expert in all Bavarian dialects. However, in the Bavarian dialect you usually hear in the Regensburg area, the endings -chen and -lein are replaced by -erl. Examples: Häuserl (Häuschen) Vogerl (Vögelchen) Zügerl (Züglein) As there are many Bavarian ...


5

Admittedly I never heard this or any similar expression in German (not even unrelated to "matter"). What comes to mind however is the now unusual German "die Mär" (used in the meaning of tale, story, report, derived from Old Hig German mârî and also in its diminutive still used in "das Märchen"). By changing gender and thus article we could have said: ...


5

זייגערמאַכער is pronounced in Standard Yiddish as /zeɪgərmaxər/ and is a composite word with both components being of German origin: זייגער and מאַכער. They also exist as separate words and both have their cognates in Standard German: Seiger and Macher. While Macher/מאַכער is someone who makes, Seiger/זייגער is/was a word for "clock" (originally: plumb line ...


4

Yiddish is a separate language that split from German about 1000 years ago. Western Yiddish was once spoken in the territories you mentioned. That dialect of Yiddish was however already moribund by the mid-twentieth century, as rates of assimilation of Jews to German-speaking culture were very high, and had been since the beginning of the Haskala in the ...


4

Yes, there is an equivalent usage of the suffix in non-dialect standard German, even though there seems to be a vowel change involved: kehren - Kehricht This is however an unusual case. For common suffixes when bulding nouns from verbs see this nice overwiew.


4

The definition of language has fundamental problems that are to a large extent parallel to those of the definition of species (or other biological clades). An apparently reasonable definition of species is: Two individuals belong to the same species if they or their close relatives can in principle produce fertile offspring together. This corresponds ...


3

Here is a typical Yiddish sentence taken from a literary source (in Latin transliteration; Yiddish has always been written in Hebrew characters): MAIN EYDIM IZ NEBAKH GIVEN A PROSTER BALMELOKHE, VOS HOT KAM MIT TSORES TSUNEYFGISHTUKEVET DI BIDNE KHEYUNE (Yeysef Rabin, talented Soviet Yiddish author). Translation: 'My son-in-law, the poor guy, ...


3

Jiddisch ist kein Dialekt. Ein Dialekt ist eine regionale Variante, die letztlich auf die historischen Stämme in der Anfangsphase der deutschen Geschichte zurückgeht, also auf Franken, Sachsen, Bayern etc. Jiddisch muß man wohl als eigenständige Sprache ansehen, ursprünglich gesprochen von Juden in Osteuropa, basierend auf einem altertümlichen Deutsch, ...


3

I guess the disgusting thing is Jauche. Etymologically it comes from the Sorbian word "jucha" which means "Brühe". And "Brühe" is the English "broth". Jauche and broth are both liquids, so I wouldn't be surprised about that change of the meaning. If you mess up your broth and it does not taste, then people may say, it smells like (liquid) manure. That could ...


3

"Es geht ans Eingemachte" also means that "it's getting serious now", in the sense of "using the last reserves" / scraping the barrel".


3

Heinrich Heine träumte es von einem Königskind: Mir träumte von einem Königskind Mir träumte von einem Königskind, Mit nassen, blassen Wangen; Wir saßen unter der grünen Lind', Und hielten uns liebumfangen. "Ich will nicht Deines Vaters Thron, Und nicht sein Zepter von Golde, Ich will nicht seine demantene Kron', ...


3

Native speaker (Rhineland) here. I know and understand jmd. hat Chuzpe (allgemein gehalten) jmd. hat die Chuzpe, etwas zu tun (auf einen speziellen Fall bezogen) and I know that other native speakers, at least those of higher education, should understand. The word "Chutzpadik", as "freche Menschen", is unknown in modern German. Before Shoa, more Yiddish/...


2

Zappelig After having done some research I did not find any other meaning of "zappeln", "zappelig" than in the sense of something or someone moving fast back and forth or being restless. This meaning dates as far back as to old high german (according to Pfeifer): zappeln Vb. ‘(mit den Gliedmaßen, mit dem Körper) schnelle, unruhige Bewegungen machen’, ...


2

Wikipedia says, Yiddish descends from Middle High German, as it was spoken in the High Middle Ages in the Rhineland. When I stumble across a yiddish phrase, I can mostly get the meaning - as I can with Dutch, but I come from a rural area near Salzburg (Austria) where a dialect is spoken, which is closer to Middle High German than to Standard German. I ...


2

YIVO maintains a list of dictionaries available in its library, which one can assume represents a large share of all existing Yiddish dictionaries. Two of them are classified as etymological dictionaries: Paul Abelson, English–Yiddish encyclopedical dictionary, New York 1915 Groyser verterbukh fun der Yidisher shprakh (4 volumes, incomplete), New York 1961–...


2

auslegen / die Auslegung Both these German terms are used for the process of text interpretation. This is not used for spelling, or conceiving single word meanings but rather for a more logical analysis of a written text as a whole (e.g. a law, the Bible, a contract). Interestingly the English "to spell" origins from a no longer used German verb spellen ...


2

The verb auslegen has several meanings, the ones I can immediately think of being variations of "to display" and "to arrange". The literal translation is "to lay out". In my own experience, auslegen is not a term contemporarily used in Germany for spelling, but it could be in widespread use in the technical language(s) relevant to printing. Off the top of ...


2

The German term "Beziehung" covers multiple aspects of relationship, and beside being the plural, "Beziehungen" has some additional meanings. However, while you might tell or guess an attitude towards somebody from a persons "Beziehung" to that other person, you would not denote it that way but would use "Haltung", "Einstellung", "Gesinnung", or "Verhalten": ...



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