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39

I’ve never heard or seen the word chutzpadik in German. Chuzpe, on the other hand, is well-known. It’s not a word that the average German is using in everyday speech, but it occurs occasionally, say, in newspaper articles, sometimes with, sometimes without explanation.


20

I am a historian and I had never encountered chutzpadik in German sources. I have found the word, however, in a Jüdisches Lexikon published in Berlin in 1927: Ein chuzef, auch chuzpenik oder chuzpedig = frecher Mensch and also in the 1903 issue of the Jewish magazine from Berlin Ost und West: Gotteslästerer ... chuzpedige Lümmel the latter ...


12

I’m a native speaker and I have never heard that word. Perhaps it is a bit more common in other regions then the one where I have grown up and live. There are local differences concerning the vocabulary of the spoken language. But I don’t think so in this case. I think I’ve read chuzpe in a magazine once. But long story short: Chutzpadik is not a ...


6

Answers to your questions: It would be “Mach Nacht und geh’ schlafen” Yes, the literal translation is “Make night and go to sleep”. But: Mach Nacht makes — as the English translation — no sense. In German you would rather say “turn off the lights and go to sleep” (“Dreh’ das Licht ab und geh’ schlafen.”) or something similar.


5

There is no such thing as a standard diminutive -el in Bavarian. Even though I'm from Bavaria I'm not an expert in all Bavarian dialects. However, in the Bavarian dialect you usually hear in the Regensburg area, the endings -chen and -lein are replaced by -erl. Examples: Häuserl (Häuschen) Vogerl (Vögelchen) Zügerl (Züglein) As there are many Bavarian ...


4

The definition of language has fundamental problems that are to a large extent parallel to those of the definition of species (or other biological clades). An apparently reasonable definition of species is: Two individuals belong to the same species if they or their close relatives can in principle produce fertile offspring together. This corresponds ...


4

זייגערמאַכער is pronounced in Standard Yiddish as /zeɪgərmaxər/ and is a composite word with both components being of German origin: זייגער and מאַכער. They also exist as separate words and both have their cognates in Standard German: Seiger and Macher. While Macher/מאַכער is someone who makes, Seiger/זייגער is/was a word for "clock" (originally: plumb line ...


3

Here is a typical Yiddish sentence taken from a literary source (in Latin transliteration; Yiddish has always been written in Hebrew characters): MAIN EYDIM IZ NEBAKH GIVEN A PROSTER BALMELOKHE, VOS HOT KAM MIT TSORES TSUNEYFGISHTUKEVET DI BIDNE KHEYUNE (Yeysef Rabin, talented Soviet Yiddish author). Translation: 'My son-in-law, the poor guy, ...


3

Native speaker (Rhineland) here. I know and understand jmd. hat Chuzpe (allgemein gehalten) jmd. hat die Chuzpe, etwas zu tun (auf einen speziellen Fall bezogen) and I know that other native speakers, at least those of higher education, should understand. The word "Chutzpadik", as "freche Menschen", is unknown in modern German. Before Shoa, more Yiddish/...


2

YIVO maintains a list of dictionaries available in its library, which one can assume represents a large share of all existing Yiddish dictionaries. Two of them are classified as etymological dictionaries: Paul Abelson, English–Yiddish encyclopedical dictionary, New York 1915 Groyser verterbukh fun der Yidisher shprakh (4 volumes, incomplete), New York 1961–...


1

The -dik ending is Yiddish, meaning "having this characteristic" and generally used to make an adjective from a noun. Chutzpah is something one can have, a noun. Chutzpadik is an adjective meaning "having chutzpah." (Example: That answer was really chutzpadik.) -dik does not come from Hebrew, and may come from the archaic high German from which Yiddish ...


1

I don't know about dialects but in standard German, a small rabbit would be das kleine Kaninchen. Same goes for das kleine Mädchen etc. The German Wikipedia article on diminutives has a section that lists just the examples you are talking about. As for lokshen, Merriam-Webster lists the origin as Russian but I don't know enough about Russian grammar to say ...



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