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37

I’ve never heard or seen the word chutzpadik in German. Chuzpe, on the other hand, is well-known. It’s not a word that the average German is using in everyday speech, but it occurs occasionally, say, in newspaper articles, sometimes with, sometimes without explanation.


18

I am a historian and I had never encountered chutzpadik in German sources. I have found the word, however, in a Jüdisches Lexikon published in Berlin in 1927: Ein chuzef, auch chuzpenik oder chuzpedig = frecher Mensch and also in the 1903 issue of the Jewish magazine from Berlin Ost und West: Gotteslästerer ... chuzpedige Lümmel the latter ...


12

I’m a native speaker and I have never heard that word. Perhaps it is a bit more common in other regions then the one where I have grown up and live. There are local differences concerning the vocabulary of the spoken language. But I don’t think so in this case. I think I’ve read chuzpe in a magazine once. But long story short: Chutzpadik is not a ...


6

Answers to your questions: It would be “Mach Nacht und geh’ schlafen” Yes, the literal translation is “Make night and go to sleep”. But: Mach Nacht makes — as the English translation — no sense. In German you would rather say “turn off the lights and go to sleep” (“Dreh’ das Licht ab und geh’ schlafen.”) or something similar.


5

There is no such thing as a standard diminutive -el in Bavarian. Even though I'm from Bavaria I'm not an expert in all Bavarian dialects. However, in the Bavarian dialect you usually hear in the Regensburg area, the endings -chen and -lein are replaced by -erl. Examples: Häuserl (Häuschen) Vogerl (Vögelchen) Zügerl (Züglein) As there are many Bavarian ...


4

The definition of language has fundamental problems that are to a large extent parallel to those of the definition of species (or other biological clades). An apparently reasonable definition of species is: Two individuals belong to the same species if they or their close relatives can in principle produce fertile offspring together. This corresponds ...


3

Native speaker (Rhineland) here. I know and understand jmd. hat Chuzpe (allgemein gehalten) jmd. hat die Chuzpe, etwas zu tun (auf einen speziellen Fall bezogen) and I know that other native speakers, at least those of higher education, should understand. The word "Chutzpadik", as "freche Menschen", is unknown in modern German. Before Shoa, more ...


3

Here is a typical Yiddish sentence taken from a literary source (in Latin transliteration; Yiddish has always been written in Hebrew characters): MAIN EYDIM IZ NEBAKH GIVEN A PROSTER BALMELOKHE, VOS HOT KAM MIT TSORES TSUNEYFGISHTUKEVET DI BIDNE KHEYUNE (Yeysef Rabin, talented Soviet Yiddish author). Translation: 'My son-in-law, the poor guy, ...


3

Jiddisch ist kein Dialekt. Ein Dialekt ist eine regionale Variante, die letztlich auf die historischen Stämme in der Anfangsphase der deutschen Geschichte zurückgeht, also auf Franken, Sachsen, Bayern etc. Jiddisch muß man wohl als eigenständige Sprache ansehen, ursprünglich gesprochen von Juden in Osteuropa, basierend auf einem altertümlichen Deutsch, ...


2

YIVO maintains a list of dictionaries available in its library, which one can assume represents a large share of all existing Yiddish dictionaries. Two of them are classified as etymological dictionaries: Paul Abelson, English–Yiddish encyclopedical dictionary, New York 1915 Groyser verterbukh fun der Yidisher shprakh (4 volumes, incomplete), New York ...


1

The -dik ending is Yiddish, meaning "having this characteristic" and generally used to make an adjective from a noun. Chutzpah is something one can have, a noun. Chutzpadik is an adjective meaning "having chutzpah." (Example: That answer was really chutzpadik.) -dik does not come from Hebrew, and may come from the archaic high German from which Yiddish ...


1

I don't know about dialects but in standard German, a small rabbit would be das kleine Kaninchen. Same goes for das kleine Mädchen etc. The German Wikipedia article on diminutives has a section that lists just the examples you are talking about. As for lokshen, Merriam-Webster lists the origin as Russian but I don't know enough about Russian grammar to say ...



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