1,226 reputation
421
bio website blogs.wiki-dot.net/alaudo
location Sunnyvale, CA
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Jul 14 at 18:47

From December, 2013 I work as Software Developer at Microsoft Bing in Sunnyvale, California.

Until October 2013 I worked as a Senior Developer at Eurofins in Hamburg, Germany.

Microsoft Azure Insider

Microsoft Expert Student Partner in German MSP Team.
7x MTA | 17x MCTS | 5x MCITP | 5x MCPD | Azure MCSA | MCT

Email: alaudo@gmail.com

@alaudo


Dec
14
comment Speaking German with accent: a status symbol or a sign of being a foreigner?
Thank you for your compliment, but there was something more in it than just "valuing my opinion", especially because I am still a student, not a full-time developer. But this is still a very interesting point!
Dec
14
accepted Browser Add-ons to learn German
Dec
14
accepted If “Brotaufstrich” is something they smear on bread, why “Fruchtaufstrich” is not smeared on fruit?
Dec
13
revised German dictionary with detailed declensions, audio pronunciations, and IPA
corrected some mistakes, added some info
Dec
13
answered German dictionary with detailed declensions, audio pronunciations, and IPA
Dec
12
comment Speaking German with accent: a status symbol or a sign of being a foreigner?
Thank you for your sincere answer. From my side I must confess that the tolerance towards foreign accents in Russian is much worse, this is probably the result of nation being mono-cultural for long time.
Dec
12
comment Speaking German with accent: a status symbol or a sign of being a foreigner?
Hmm, I have never thought of it but he has a very strong dialect so that it takes people for quite some time to get accustomed to his normal speech. Thanks a lot!
Dec
12
revised Speaking German with accent: a status symbol or a sign of being a foreigner?
added 9 characters in body
Dec
12
asked Speaking German with accent: a status symbol or a sign of being a foreigner?
Dec
12
revised Online Language Tools for advanced learners? Online-Sprachwerkzeuge für Fortgeschrittene?
added 3 characters in body
Dec
12
answered German alternatives to “Shit happens”?
Dec
12
answered How to say “pull the plug” in German?
Dec
12
asked Online Language Tools for advanced learners? Online-Sprachwerkzeuge für Fortgeschrittene?
Nov
27
revised word-usage wiki excerpt
added 189 characters in body
Nov
26
suggested suggested edit on word-usage tag wiki excerpt
Nov
26
wiki created word-usage excerpt
Nov
26
comment If “Brotaufstrich” is something they smear on bread, why “Fruchtaufstrich” is not smeared on fruit?
I searched both documents with my PDF viewer and FireFox and did not find any entry. Moreover, the Wikipedia article itself tells that Fruchtaufstricht does not fall into any category there. For English translation of this article see my reply.
Nov
26
comment If “Brotaufstrich” is something they smear on bread, why “Fruchtaufstrich” is not smeared on fruit?
And to the rest of your answer: it is clear to me that in most cases the common sense decides for the meaning of a composite word, and since German is not a planned language like Esperanto (though this is true even there) the composite noun is understood correctly. But I couldn't find the word in my Duden and hence is the question whether it is correct or not. I hope you agree that not every word that is understood is correct (or was originally correctly formed), even if it is in active use...
Nov
26
comment If “Brotaufstrich” is something they smear on bread, why “Fruchtaufstrich” is not smeared on fruit?
Yes, it is possible, what I am trying to point out is that in some cases the part of a composite word is a subject in the phrase and sometimes its object.
Nov
26
comment If “Brotaufstrich” is something they smear on bread, why “Fruchtaufstrich” is not smeared on fruit?
Apart from planned languages such as Esperanto, languages evolve over time. As a person who learned Esperanto at the age of 6 (and thus considering it being almost a native language) I assure you that this language evolves over years.