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Jul
20
awarded  Editor
Jul
20
revised Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
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Jul
20
comment Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
@Veredomon Hmmm... would it be fair to say that we're actually dealing with "desire" vs. "intention" rather than "volition" vs. "future"? Because "wollen" definitely has more "intention" than "to want". And "intention" commonly leads to future actions, but I'd still rather group it under "volition" than under "future".
Jul
20
comment Does “wollen” ever function like English “will” to signal a future event (no volition)
"Die Straße soll..." - if I wanted to express the future, I'd drop the Futur and use "Die Straße wird ... gesperrt". I'd understand your example sentence to mean "I've heard that they will...". Do you have more contemporary examples for this?
Jul
20
comment Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
"Es will Abend werden" - never heard that. "Will nicht verschwinden" - in this idiom, the "Mauer" is personified to be something that actively refuses to disappear. I see volition only.
Jul
20
comment Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
@Veredomon I don't see "proof" of anything that contradicts my statement in the other question. I don't see how "volition" can be fulfilled in any time but the future, though. Do you disagree on the meaning of any of the example sentences?
Jul
20
answered Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
May
20
comment Züruckgreifen – indirekte Rede nutzen oder nicht?
@chirlu: Nun ja, aber der Konjunktiv I drückt meines Erachtens keinerlei in-Zweifel-ziehen aus, ich übernehme eben nur keine Verantwortung dafür. Wenn ich etwas "in Zweifel ziehe", dann behaupte ich ja zumindest, dass es keine sichere Tatsache ist, und dafür kann ich sehr wohl bereits den KJ2 verwenden: "X behauptet, es gäbe am Mars Leben; ich aber finde, wir sollten noch auf Beweise warten". Das ist noch ein Schritt unter "von der Unrichtigkeit überzeugt", aber es ist "in Zweifel ziehen".
May
18
comment Züruckgreifen – indirekte Rede nutzen oder nicht?
Um sich vom Inhalt zu distanzieren/ihn in Zweifel zu ziehen, sollte man den Konjunktiv II verrwenden (wäre)-
Apr
22
comment The verb “zuwarten”
"Warten" can be used without a concrete target. The difference between "abwarten" and "zuwarten" is that with "abwarten", you are waiting for a certain condition to be reached; with "zuwarten" you are waiting a bit longer in the hope that conditions will have improved until then, without necessarily reaching a definite target.
Apr
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
17
awarded  Yearling
Apr
17
comment “Don't all shout at once” in German
@Mawg: You're forgetting that the German language is also used in Austria and Switzerland.
Apr
17
comment Was bedeutet “Bussi schleck”?
Yes, context please. Especially as we have two very different competing answers that can easily be disambiguated by context, by spelling (if you've seen it written) or by geography (if you know where the speaker was from).
Apr
17
answered Can “sollen” in literary German be used to convey an idea of future?
Apr
17
answered Was bedeutet “Bussi schleck”?
Apr
17
comment Which translation of “just” does German use to imply some minor/short activity?
Dialect/regional note: #2 "mal" is a colloquial shortening of hochdeutsch "einmal" - Austrian variant would be "amal". #4 and #6 are nonexistent/unusable in Austria.
Mar
12
comment Begleiten die Konjunktionen “sobald” und “sowie” einen Haupt- oder Nebensatz?
Der Dativ kommt von "guttun": "Der Saunabesuch hat dem Kind gut getan, und er hat auch der ganzen Familie gut getan".
Mar
12
comment How to translate “aber” in a negative question?
@Lora85; it is an adverb, and I insist my translation is correct. It relates the question to preceding context, so I guess "connecting adverb" would be the corresponding term in English grammar. Where did you hear of the rule that an adverb has to precede a conjugated verb? And what is a coordination adverb? (Google only refers me to a badly translated dissertation on modern Chinese coordination adverbs...)
Mar
11
comment How to translate “aber” in a negative question?
@Lora85 see also german.stackexchange.com/questions/9058/…