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Nov
5
comment Reflexive “treffen” when planning to meet someone?
The question seems redundant--to meet someone as opposed to simply meeting them? Do you mean meet them as in being first introduced vs meeting up with them regardless of being the first time or not?
Oct
23
comment What is “It turns out that…” in standard German?
The phrase "sich erweisen als" is probably what you're looking for. Your example doesn't quite match your question, as I understand it. Or do you mean "sich herausstellen"?
Oct
10
comment Wann sagt man “physikalisch” und wann “physisch”?
Hast du es schon mal im Wörterbuch nachgeschlagen? Da gibt's wohl sicher Beispiele, oder?
Oct
4
comment Stranded preposition: Meine Familie geht da echt gut mit um
@chirlu I just meant that using standard words in nonstandard ways can happen pretty much anywhere. That's why I said "that sort of thing", meaning that changing words around doesn't necessarily make it a dialect as much as a colloquial practice. Specific words that are changed may only occur in certain regions, as in this case. But I was just addressing the use of the word "dialect".
Oct
3
comment Stranded preposition: Meine Familie geht da echt gut mit um
I wouldn't say it's so much a dialect but rather a colloquial practice. It's still a standard word that's just used in a nonstandard way. That sort of thing can happen pretty much anywhere.
Sep
23
comment “Last spring” in “I took this math course last spring”
@chirlu There's no essential change in meaning, just verb case (Dat, Akk).
Sep
10
comment Is 'Grüß Gott' greeting in Bavaria religious-neutral?
By comparison you could say it's on the level of the English "[God] bless you" when you sneeze. Nobody nowadays gives it a religious connection. :-)
Aug
20
awarded  Critic
Aug
12
answered How do you say “I walked in the park” in German?
Jul
31
comment Adjectives as determinatives
I'm not sure I totally follow your logic, starting with the sentences becoming ungrammatical by removing the lead words. Can you explain that? Also, "obig" is the only true lead adjective whereas "genannt" and "besagt" are technically participles acting as adjectives, so your examples seem to be a mix of types for what you seem to be asking. Regardless, they are functioning as if an indefinite article preceded them and don't determine the nouns' genders themselves. Can you please clarify a little further what you're asking? Maybe I'm missing something here. :)
Jul
22
revised “Schönes Wochenende” versus “Schönen Wochenende”
Improved
Jul
12
answered “Schönes Wochenende” versus “Schönen Wochenende”
Apr
27
comment Why are “vier” and the beginning of “vierzehn” not pronounced the same?
Something to explore is also that a German "r" within a word tends to roll the tongue more than at the end of a word, and the shift in pronunciation of "vierzehn" is almost like trying to roll the tongue quickly. German historically has a strong emphasis on rolling the tongue with an "r".
Apr
20
comment How to translate Perfekt into English
Good and proper translations rely heavily on context. Sometimes one language may state something in the present which would be translated in the past or future tense in another language. Context dictates the proper answer. It's difficult to come up with too many hard and fast rules that won't have exceptions anyway. Just a side note. ;-)
Apr
1
answered What does “stackenblochen” mean?
Mar
15
comment translation of a line from the german version of “We're Going to Hang out the Washing on the Siegfried Line”
Welcome to GL&U, Jane Doe! The English translation on that page is terrible. Maybe it fits the music or something. I'd say "up until" would better translate the "bis zu(m)" construction.
Mar
13
answered “Die Worte” vs. “die Wörter”
Feb
15
comment “Ich zieh … und wünsch mir …”: what is the subject?
I edited the answer to reflect this
Feb
15
revised “Ich zieh … und wünsch mir …”: what is the subject?
Clarification of forms
Feb
15
answered “Ich zieh … und wünsch mir …”: what is the subject?