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seen Mar 30 at 22:42

Sep
9
comment Was bedeutet “für die Füße sein”?
Ihm wurde es mitgeteilt, aber ja, da hast du auch sowieso recht. :)
Sep
8
answered Was bedeutet “für die Füße sein”?
Sep
4
answered Confused between usage of den vs einen?
Aug
24
answered Is “ich” a subject or not
Jul
7
comment Woher stammt die Verwendung des Infinitivs als Ersatz für den Imperativ?
Schön hinzugefügt! ;-)
Jul
2
comment “helfen jmdm.” vs. “helfen zu jmdm.”
Consider poetic license with word order. Switch it around to "Wir eilen zu Dir zu helfen" and it might be clearer to you. :-)
Jul
1
comment What is the relationship between “Hochzeit” and “Hochmut?”
I hope you got what you're looking for. :-) Although this principle can apply in most cases, be aware that words do change meanings and usage over time, and sometimes a whole new word and meaning can result that gets away from the individual roots.
Jul
1
comment What is the relationship between “Hochzeit” and “Hochmut?”
Why do you assume there's a specific connection between these words? Is there a certain context? Not every word with the same prefix is related except that they have the same prefix. In this case the only connection may be they each reflect some elevated or outstanding extreme condition of the root words.
Jun
20
comment “denn” vs. “dann”
I would also point out that "denn" in this case is bordering on being more a flavoring particle or afterthought. If you want to specifically emphasize "then", then use "dann" or even "da". That might be another way to think of it.
Jun
18
comment When to use the pronoun “es”?
The only thing I would add is that using the "es" in this case makes it into "there" in English, like "es wird" = "there is/will be" and so on. That's probably what you meant by "a different usage than the English 'it'". Its inclusion or exclusion works the same way in both languages.
Jun
15
comment What is the meaning of “afterburne”
Welcome to GL&U! Is there perhaps anything more to the phrase you can remember or how it was used? Or could you try to write it out phonetically instead of in pseudo-German? It might help.
Jun
11
comment Read old handwritten Text
I think you've nailed it spot on. And the last word does end with an "n". You can see the two bumps for the "n" with a fancy swirl as a tail, similar to the "von" at the beginning of the second line or the swirl on "im" before "Jahr" on the first line.
Jun
2
awarded  Enlightened
May
31
awarded  Enlightened
May
31
awarded  Nice Answer
May
31
comment What are the rules behind this translated phrase: “das, was ihr mich habt tun sehen”?
And Takkat, you could even start that phrase with a "daß" to throw all the verbs together completely, lol. Bastian Sick is so great. :-)
May
31
comment What are the rules behind this translated phrase: “das, was ihr mich habt tun sehen”?
@Em1 Not to mention that there can be several ways of saying "to do" depending on context.
May
31
comment What are the rules behind this translated phrase: “das, was ihr mich habt tun sehen”?
I'm glad it all helped, Dougvj. Great addition, Takkat. :-)
May
31
revised What are the rules behind this translated phrase: “das, was ihr mich habt tun sehen”?
highlighting
May
31
revised What are the rules behind this translated phrase: “das, was ihr mich habt tun sehen”?
further clarification