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seen Mar 30 at 22:42

Apr
18
comment Using “-lein” and “-chen”
Takkat's question is about "how" to form the diminutive. I'm going beyond that. Books and web posts I find say both endings are interchangeable, though one tends to be more common. But sometimes one ending can change the meaning a little (consider "Männchen" vs "Männlein") or is more traditional ("Mädlein" vs "Mädchen") or awkward ("Löchchen" vs "Löchlein"). From what I find, it seems either ending is technically always possible (grammatical) but sometimes too awkward (impractical). I'm asking if some words just cannot by some rule use both endings or simply will not for impracticality.
Apr
18
asked Using “-lein” and “-chen”
Apr
16
comment “bis der Tod euch scheide” or “bis der Tod euch scheidet”?
They're basically asking if you want to be faithful to her until you're separated in death and do you want to still love her even after the sex is gone.
Apr
16
comment “bis der Tod euch scheide” or “bis der Tod euch scheidet”?
„Scheide" (normally English "sheath" like for a knife) is also a slang word for the vagina. You can maybe picture the connection of a knife and a sheath.
Apr
14
comment Is the title of the “Vincent will Meer” grammatically correct?
Die Grammatik sorgt nicht für „Wirklichkeit". :)
Apr
14
comment Is the title of the “Vincent will Meer” grammatically correct?
@userunknown Grammar doesn't always provide for reality, even though the grammar may be functionally correct. And to express a desire doesn't necessarily mean you can actually have it. That didn't seem important to me in just having the question answered. But your point is valid.
Apr
12
asked “Personen” or “Menschen”
Apr
12
comment German postpositions
"Zufolge" follows Dativ but precedes Genitiv, as in "dem Bericht zufolge" or "zufolge des Berichts".
Apr
7
comment Is there a german equivalent for 'prepper'?
Do you mean what used to be called preppies, kind of the opposite of punkers? Guys who dress stylishly and all that? The English word will be used just like with punkers.
Apr
3
answered What is the difference between “wie” and “was” in a certain context?
Mar
25
comment Sentence order when using “abends”, “morgens”, etc
Agreed. Typically the word order is taught as time, place, and then manner (such as with whom, etc.).
Mar
25
comment How do you translate German wordplay into English?
You might also note Geziefer's answer about the rock group Rammstein here
Mar
25
comment How do you translate German wordplay into English?
Each language has its own word plays, and some things just can't be translated directly. Translators can usually convey the meaning but not always the specific ironic expression that may only make sense to the native or someone who can pick out the rhyming sound or whatever. Those puns and expressions are part of what defines a language's uniqueness to its people.
Mar
24
accepted Of starting and stopping
Mar
23
asked Of starting and stopping
Mar
21
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
21
comment Difference between 'Ich sollte' and 'Ich hätte … sollen'
I suppose you didn't. I just took it that way in context of the question being asked, that the asker was referring to whethe the two constructs accomplished the same meaning [in past tense]. You did a good job of covering all usage.
Mar
20
comment Difference between 'Ich sollte' and 'Ich hätte … sollen'
Your example of something in the present time (still needing time to think about it) is actually subjunctive (Konjunktiv) rather than past tense, as Jan pointed out in his comment on the other answer. The form is the same, but the meaning is actually different. I think you took this into account in your explanation maybe without realizing it, as I do agree with what you said otherwise.
Mar
20
comment Difference between 'Ich sollte' and 'Ich hätte … sollen'
Jan is absolutely correct. Beware of the subjunctive (Konjunktiv) forms.