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seen Mar 30 at 22:42

Mar
11
comment What are differences between “ins” and “in”?
@HendrikVogt and user unknown: I was merely trying to answer the specific question, not overload John with too many explanations. Perhaps I could have chosen a better example that wouldn't lead into a whole different discussion. Thanks for your input.
Mar
11
revised Is “Für jeden ein Gewinn” grammatically correct?
Addition to make sure the actual questions were answered
Mar
11
comment Is “Für jeden ein Gewinn” grammatically correct?
It could also be "Ein Gewinn ist für jeden" or "Für jeden ist ein Gewinn". The implied meaning is the same either way, but I wouldn't think it's a big enough issue to downvote over since it's an ambiguous phrase that is understood several ways. :-(
Mar
11
answered What are differences between “ins” and “in”?
Mar
11
revised Is “Für jeden ein Gewinn” grammatically correct?
corrected spelling
Mar
11
answered Is “Für jeden ein Gewinn” grammatically correct?
Mar
10
revised Liturgical or church German
formatting
Mar
10
asked Liturgical or church German
Mar
9
comment Everyday German in conversation
By the way, if that's not quite what you're looking for, it's still a nice site. :-)
Mar
9
answered Everyday German in conversation
Mar
9
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
8
answered When to use “gern” vs. “gerne”
Mar
5
answered Welcher Fall wird nach “wie [z.B.]” verwendet?
Mar
4
comment “Ellbogen” vs. “Ellenbogen” - is there a difference in usage?
In truth German has so many dialects and regionalisms, that I wonder sometimes if there really is a standard German, or if it even matters. ;-)
Mar
3
comment Asking “Which [something]”
Additionally, you can use "welch" for "was für ein" (z.B., "Welch ein großes Problem!") or for "einige" (z.B., "Es gibt keine Äpfel mehr. Oh, hier sind doch welche!") usw.
Mar
3
comment Sie/du reciprocity?
@Glenn Nelson: Yes, you certainly can't go wrong starting high (Sie) and letting the other person bring you back down (Du) to their comfort level.
Mar
2
answered “Ellbogen” vs. “Ellenbogen” - is there a difference in usage?
Feb
29
comment When to use the future tense?
In addition to the answers, I would point out that this is one of those times when German matches English. You can say, "I am traveling to Boston next week" or "I am going to travel..." or "I will travel..." all to mean a future event (note that "I travel to Boston next week" is used less often and usually only as a definitive statement). This has the same feel and usage in German.
Feb
27
comment How do I build subordinative clauses relating to genderless nouns?
@Black Your answer is exactly right. I would only add that using "wo" or "was" and the like to start the Nebensatz is another way around the problem. :-)