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Jun
15
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
awarded  Yearling
May
1
revised Words in German that begin in “kn-” and are cognates of the English words with the same meaning
edited title
Mar
28
accepted Umgekehrte Wortstellung und der Genitiv, z. B: »des Wanderers Schritte« statt »die Schritte des Wanderers«
Mar
21
comment Wort oder Redewendung für plötzliches, spontanes Vergessen
Hat dieser Ausdruck dieselbe Bedeutung wie "Ich stehe auf dem Schlauch"?
Feb
22
comment Origin of the “dem Mann sein Hut” construct
One might speculate that it is of old Germanic origin, since the construct is shared by other Germanic languages; in Norwegian for instance, the normal possessive is "Mannen sin hatt".
Jan
19
comment Do all nouns from verbs nominalized by the suffix “-ung” have a female gender?
I find it interesting that the natives don't know this, as it's one of the first things you learn as a foreigner! My teacher added humorously that it was the first and the last time we would come across a rule without an exception in the German language ...
Sep
13
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
13
revised Recommended ways to learn the cases?
added 54 characters in body
Sep
12
comment Recommended ways to learn the cases?
Interesting remark, I think you're right! The exceptions are the verbs with prepositions, though: "An wem zweifeln Sie?" and "In wen sind Sie verliebt?" do not quite fit.
Sep
12
answered Recommended ways to learn the cases?
Sep
12
comment Recommended ways to learn the cases?
I asked earlier on this site about how these sort of questions are supposed to help non-native speakers, and the conclusion is that the questions help only when your Sprachgefühl is already well developed.
Aug
31
comment Is there a reason why Germany (Deutschland) is called so many different things in other European languages?
Your supposition about Tyskland is correct. Tysk stems from the pre-nordic þýdisker which is a cognate of the High German diutisc.
Aug
25
answered What are the origin & possible meanings of the ver- prefix?
Aug
25
comment What is the meaning of the dative in this sentence: “Dem Tod die Toten.”
Ah, I see. I guess you natives can feel the implied dative before "Gott" even without an article or anything!
Aug
24
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
23
accepted What is the meaning of the dative in this sentence: “Dem Tod die Toten.”
Aug
23
comment What is the meaning of the dative in this sentence: “Dem Tod die Toten.”
Thanks for explaining it in context. I think this answer makes the meaning perfectly clear!
Aug
23
comment What is the meaning of the dative in this sentence: “Dem Tod die Toten.”
Remarkable how the poem paraphrases the passage from the book! Is this a well known poem and phrase? In the English speaking world "to be or not to be" contains connotations not inherent in the phrase itself because it stems from such a famous play; can the same be said about "Dem Tod die Toten"?
Aug
23
comment What is the meaning of the dative in this sentence: “Dem Tod die Toten.”
Could you please clarify how this relates to the question? I don't quite see the connection. :-)