21,124 reputation
23090
bio website
location Cologne, Germany
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

(your about me is currently blank)


Aug
11
comment Wie bestimmt man eindeutig die Zählform eines Verbs?
@Olaf Mainly, that would be up to the speaker ;) – That said, you shouldn't use "und" for an appendix because "und" connects it too strongly. But when you take "und", you can weaken it by using some adverbs or particles.
Aug
11
reviewed Close Liste mit “Denk-Verben”
Aug
11
comment Wie bestimmt man eindeutig die Zählform eines Verbs?
@Olaf When "(und) ebenso die Birne" is kind of appendix it doesn't affect the verb. That is, when you make a break, add some aside information and then continue your sentence, the verb doesn't change. I consider your third and fifth example as wrong. "Der Apfel und ebenso die Birne schmecken ihr gut" - "Der Apfel–und vielleicht die Birne–schmeckt ihr gut." Still, not very likely to be said by a native. They would rather say: "Der Apfel schmeckt ihr gut–und vielleicht auch die Birne."
Aug
11
comment Meistens: meaning and usage
Is großteils Austrian German and/or Bavarian? Duden doesn't have a note on this, by I'm sure I've never heard it before.
Aug
10
reviewed Approve Site to talk with people from German speaking areas
Aug
9
comment Implicit distances in demonstrative pronouns “das”, “dieses”, “jenes”
Zu 1: Stimmt, war mir entgangen. Dieses ist fein, auch wenn es nicht das aktuelle ist. Zu 2: Es gab auf jeden Fall auf ELU dazu mal ne Frage. Welches ist "this weekend". Ob es hier schon eine gab, weiß ich nicht, sie wäre aber nicht opinion-based. Die Antwort wäre aber die gleiche, wie im Englischen ;)
Aug
9
comment Implicit distances in demonstrative pronouns “das”, “dieses”, “jenes”
"Dieses Jahr" ist immer das aktuella Jahr. -> Richtig, aber interessant wird's bei "Dieses Wochenende", wenn gerade nicht Wochenende ist. Freitags: Was machst du dieses Wochenende. Montags: Was hast du dieses Wochenende gemacht. – Aber das ist ein ganz anderes Thema. Sorry :D
Aug
9
reviewed Close “zu” phrase with separable verb
Aug
9
reviewed No Action Needed What's the difference between “genau” and “stimmt”?
Aug
9
reviewed Reviewed Wo kommt der Ausdruck “Puschen” her?
Aug
9
revised Wo kommt der Ausdruck “Puschen” her?
added 3 characters in body
Aug
9
comment “zu” phrase with separable verb
german.stackexchange.com/q/11397/1224
Aug
9
comment Sprachwandel oder weit verbreiteter Misnomer von “komplex”?
Die Frage ist komplex. Äh, kompliziert?
Aug
9
comment Translation of “the 45th most beautiful city”
It's correct, although nobody would write it ;)
Aug
9
comment Implicit distances in demonstrative pronouns “das”, “dieses”, “jenes”
Furthermore, be aware that there's a slight difference between theory and praxis. You can read through the theory on different webpages, like here, but in praxis "jene-" is most times replaced and if you take "das" or "dieses" sometimes feels a bit arbitrary.
Aug
9
comment Implicit distances in demonstrative pronouns “das”, “dieses”, “jenes”
I'm afraid but I guess your Spanish had a bad influence on your German ;) "Das hier in meiner Hand", "Das da vorne" and "Das da ganz hinten an der Ecke" are all equally fine". – We recently had a question that could be of interest for you as it's about the synonymously and frequency of those words.
Aug
7
comment “einmal in der Woche” vs. “einmal die Woche”
In English both variants are fine: "once in a week", "once a week". In German either. Additionally, "einmal pro Woche" is fine as well. – None is "better". Voted for close as opinion-based.
Aug
7
comment “Jetzt dreht der Trainer am ganz großen Rad”
Das ist unerheblich. Es sind ja keine "Live"-Kommentare. Kann ja auch ein Programmierfehler sein, und der Spruch sollte ganz woanders kommen.
Aug
6
comment “Jetzt dreht der Trainer am ganz großen Rad”
Meiner Erfahrung nach sind Kommentare in den Fußballspielen schon immer grottenschlecht gewesen...
Aug
6
comment Literal meaning of: “Es ist noch kein Meister vom Himmel gefallen”
Related: “es ist/sind” versus “da ist/sind” to mean there is/areThe use of an infinitive with the pronoun “es”