21,060 reputation
23090
bio website
location Cologne, Germany
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 11 hours ago

(your about me is currently blank)


Jul
31
revised “Ich schweig Deinen Namen” - Kann schweigen transitiv sein?
added 2 characters in body; edited tags
Jul
31
revised “Ich schweig Deinen Namen” - Kann schweigen transitiv sein?
added 26 characters in body
Jul
30
comment What does “bleibt der Abwasch schon mal liegen” mean?
@user9065 "ever" is another translation in another context. "Have you ever been in London -> Bist du schon mal in London gewesen"
Jul
30
comment Difference between “häufig”, “gewöhnlich” and “üblich”
@fluffy Yes and saying "Sie sind wie üblich gekommen" is fine. But that does not work for any word, as it wouldn't work in English either. In respect to that example, in German you cannot use "häufig" and in English you cannot use "often" without modifying the sentence a bit. That's what I'm saying.
Jul
30
reviewed Leave Open Use of dative after “wegen”
Jul
30
comment Use of dative after “wegen”
Actually, @Emanuel is right, that this is a duplicate. That said, the accepted answer to the other question is not (entirely) correct. Many people would disagree with using dative being correct at all, so why recommend using dative.
Jul
30
reviewed No Action Needed Difference between “häufig”, “gewöhnlich” and “üblich”
Jul
30
answered Difference between “häufig”, “gewöhnlich” and “üblich”
Jul
30
comment What does “bleibt der Abwasch schon mal liegen” mean?
@user9065 Simplified: "schon mal" => "sometimes" (in that context)
Jul
30
comment Use of dative after “wegen”
@dirkt is right. The example sentence is clearly dative. You would recognize genitive. Also, in singular the newspaper editor would still go with dative.
Jul
30
reviewed Leave Open Complimenting 101: Hair
Jul
30
reviewed No Action Needed Word order in a sentence
Jul
30
answered Use of dative after “wegen”
Jul
28
comment What is the meaning of “Mensch” when used between friends or family members?
@Carlster Occasionally, yes. But I don't think it's the proper definition.
Jul
28
revised What is the meaning of “Mensch” when used between friends or family members?
deleted 20 characters in body
Jul
28
comment What is the meaning of “Mensch” when used between friends or family members?
@Carlster Tell me. I don't know what you mean.
Jul
28
comment Use of personal pronouns (including the polite forms)
@hellcode Oh yes, right. My second example is indeed wrong. I confused it with Spanish where the third-person conjugation is identical to the address pronoun. Never mind.
Jul
28
comment Use of personal pronouns (including the polite forms)
@hellcode I think you considered "Sie" als plural, otherwise your sentence is incorrect. In that case either "...ob sie Personal einstellen" or "...ob Sie Personal einstellt".
Jul
27
reviewed No Action Needed For a German website: how to translate “call me back”?
Jul
26
comment Use of the word “had” more than once in a statement in the German language
In oral speech you likely hear "...die er zuvor noch hatte". Your sentence, however, sounds like excerpt from a book or so and there you certainly use past perfect in both languages English and German. "gehabt hatte" is used–like "had had"–for things that happened in the past before something else in the past. A quick but terrible translation: "He was out of breath[past] and in contrast to the hurry earlier[some point before that], which he had had[past perfect!], he was now standing rooted in the open door[past].