14,997 reputation
22569
bio website n/a
location Germany
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 1 hour ago

I am a software engineer who is interested in improving his languages skills :)


Jul
25
comment Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
@userunknown Nitpicking. Bitte, lass es sein! Ja, ohne Kontext könnte "sein" doppeldeutig sein, aber es ist doch eindeutig, was ich meine. Und wenn ich das Auto meines Bruder reparieren lassen will, dann sage ich "Ich lasse das Auto meines Bruders reparieren" und nicht "Ich lasse mir sein Auto reparieren". Nein, nein und nochmals NEIN!
Jul
24
comment Is there a difference between “bauen” and “erbauen”?
Here's a quite good answer in German. de.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100129174530AADwtcy
Jul
24
comment Is there a difference between “bauen” and “erbauen”?
Instead of to edify go with to erect: to build something - The church was erected in 1582.
Jul
24
comment Is there a difference between “bauen” and “erbauen”?
And don't forget "(wieder) aufbauen" ;)
Jul
24
comment Is there a difference between “bauen” and “erbauen”?
Hahaha... Honestly, there's no significant difference between "Die Kirche wurde erbaut" and "Die Kirche wurde gebaut". Imho, the only difference is that erbauen is more about the process while bauen is more about the result.
Jul
24
comment Is there a difference between “bauen” and “erbauen”?
Ouuuu.... Well. First I would be very careful about saying that er is often re. It might be true in some cases but erbauen is one example where it's not true. Otherwise it means that Rome had been rebuild ;) Consider Er- words independently; as new words. Different words. Anyway. About edify. I had to look up this word and from OALD, you're wrong. Looking at merriam-webster, you're archaic ;) Erbauen means to edify and to uplift and to establish but this is a different context and has nothing to do with to build. Again, the build-meaning in to edify is archaic.
Jul
24
comment Is there a difference between “bauen” and “erbauen”?
"Peter baut eine Kirche" but not "Peter erbaut eine Kirche". "Die Kirche wurde erbaut[=errichtet]" and "Die Kirche wurde gebaut." In all other cases you only use "bauen".
Jul
24
revised Haferschleim vs Haferbrei
added 2 characters in body
Jul
24
comment Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
@bouscher Actually the reason I did this is because I don't agree with both answers, yours and Vogel612's. I, however, cannot really provide an answer either. I just want to show that's it's more complex than it appears on first glance.
Jul
24
comment Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
@bouscher Of course it's not equally. Otherwise it would be synonymous. Otherwise the examples in the beginning would likely be idiomatic. My point is, that this is the idea behind it, kinda of implicit meaning. Btw. the German words I enumerated I'd taken from the Duden definition and I just translated them.
Jul
24
comment Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
@bouscher "jemanden etwas machen lassen" means that you allow to do something. E.g. "Ich lasse mich nicht an der Nase herumführen" means that I don't allow anyone to 'play games with me' (if this is idiomatic English).
Jul
24
answered Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
Jul
24
comment Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
@indoxica You bring up a good point. I think in case of cut hairs you can say "sich seine" or "sich die" but it's somewhat odd to omit sich. When talking about car repair, you say "lässt sein", perhaps regionally "lässt sich sein" but definitely not "lässst sich ein" as currently in this answer. About why... Not sure yet.
Jul
24
comment Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
Hahaha @Takkat. Brilliant example. For me it's "Sie lässt sich die Haare schneiden" but "Er lässt sein Auto reparieren".
Jul
24
reviewed Close Warum sagt man “letzte Woche” aber “in der letzten Woche”?
Jul
24
comment Are “lassen” and “sich lassen”, when used causatively, interchangeable?
I'd consider this as wrong but I wouldn't be surprised if this is common is some regions. I even must admit that I probably wouldn't notice if someone add sich in this sentence.
Jul
23
revised What phrases to use for certain situations when your little children play in the playground?
edited tags, body and title
Jul
23
revised Origin of “man” in impersonal sentences
deleted 8 characters in body
Jul
23
answered Origin of “man” in impersonal sentences
Jul
22
reviewed Approve suggested edit on On the use of apostrophes in a Heine poem