21,060 reputation
23090
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location Cologne, Germany
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
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May
20
revised What does “Da kommt sein Schiff an eine kleine Insel” mean?
added 136 characters in body; edited title
May
19
reviewed No Action Needed Is there any difference between “ein bisschen” and “ein wenig”?
May
19
reviewed No Action Needed Differences between “Lehrveranstaltung” and “Vorlesung”?
May
19
reviewed Close Position of “nicht” and object
May
19
comment Article with dates necessary?
In the first sentence, I would repeat "dem": "zwischem dem 1. Feb und dem 15. Mar". I don't think that it ever works without an article (for these examples; there might be some use cases where you can drop them, but I can't think of any right now).
May
19
revised Article with dates necessary?
added 1 character in body
May
19
comment “To know somebody” as in “have knowledge of”
The closest translation–according to the dictionary–is "wissen" or "kennen". You ask for "have knowledge of" and Pons suggest "know (have information/knowledge): wissen, kennen". If you scroll down to the "recognize"-part and look at the examples, you'd see that they have nothing in common with your examples here. That is, "erkennen" is clearly wrong here. It's still valid for a different context. "Do you recognize her on this picture?" -> "Erkennst du sie auf diesem Bild?"
May
19
comment How does the current usage of Futur I sound to native German speakers?
"When you indicate a time, you can (should? not sure) use the present instead" -> Almost. What matters is whether you're talking about something very soon or further away and how reliable that is. "Morgen gehe ich in die Schule. Nächstes Jahr werde ich zur Uni gehen." Tomorrow is very soon and it's pretty sure that you'll go to school (if you're not catching a cold). Next year is further away and there still may be some reservations about it being true. (You might decide different, you might not finish school, whatever...)
May
19
revised How does the current usage of Futur I sound to native German speakers?
added 3 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
May
18
comment Correct translation of “my father taught me to play football”?
@WalterTross In my opinion, there's no other connotation and it clearly indicates that your father taught you how to play football. If you're unsure, however, you could say "Mein Vater hat mir beigebracht, wie man Fußball spielt."
May
18
comment Correct translation of “my father taught me to play football”?
Germans use simple past quite rarely...
May
18
comment Position of “nicht” and object
Related (if not duplicate): german.stackexchange.com/q/5437/1224 - german.stackexchange.com/q/1101/1224
May
17
revised Relative clauses and the dative case
added 1 character in body
May
17
comment Relative clauses and the dative case
I didn't know that you speak Dutch, but clausule is supposed to be clause, isn't it? Furthermore, you did the same typo twice (copy & paste, I guess). It's sie not si ;)
May
17
comment Translation of “I work whenever I want to work.”
I'd recommend not using Google Translate. Try a dictionary with categories (I suggest Pons). You can look up translations for the actual meaning you're using the word for. "Whenever" basically has two different meanings, "on any occasion" and "every time". You're looking for the former one and the closest and here best translation is "wann (auch) immer".
May
15
comment Unterschied zwischen “bequem”, “gemütlich” und “angenehm”
Für mich können Schuhe und Sessel durchaus gemütlich sein. Die Aussage, dass diese Kollokation nie zusammen auftreten ist schlichtweg falsch. Eine simple Google-Abfrage bestätigt dies. Eine Corpus-Suche unterstützt meine Aussage auch. Wenngleich "gemütliche Schuhe" nahezu gegen Null tendiert, der "gemütliche Sessel" ist sehr gängig.
May
15
revised Unterschied zwischen “bequem”, “gemütlich” und “angenehm”
added 12 characters in body
May
15
answered Unterschied zwischen “bequem”, “gemütlich” und “angenehm”
May
15
comment Unterschied zwischen “bequem”, “gemütlich” und “angenehm”
Vergiss nicht "komfortabel" und "behaglich"? ;)
May
15
revised Unterschied zwischen “bequem”, “gemütlich” und “angenehm”
edited body; edited tags; edited title