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1h
comment Connecting sentences into a question?
@Gerhard I fixed the "mir/mich"-issue as it wasn't part of this question.
12h
comment Die Deklination vom Indefinit-Pronomen “all” (nur für Sachen)
Wieso hat es keinen Plural? Doch hat es. Siehe hier. Wobei ich nicht ganz verstehe, was du mit "nur für Sache" meinst. Aber wahrscheinlich irrelevant für die Frage. Letzlich ist es noch ein Duplikat: german.stackexchange.com/q/20176/1224
2d
comment Is the following sentence, in terms of its adjectival declension, right?
You say that indefinite and possessive articles tend to have some exceptions. I'm not sure what you refer to, because there are no exceptions, not even some. The declension is always equal. I wonder if you might not be familiar with weak, strong and mixed declension?
Jul
30
comment Rechtschreibung adjektivierter Partikeln
Das einzige deiner Beispiele was ich im realen Leben gehört habe, war das "zu(h)e Fenster". Hat jemand schonmal die anderen gehört?
Jul
30
comment »Die Tür ist auf« vs. »Die Tür ist offen«
Jap, wobei die Ableitung von Adverb zu Adjektiv nicht wirklich damit vergleichbar ist. Zugegeben, ich weiß nicht, wie die Etymologie zu "zu" aussieht. Aber ich während ich die Ableitung Adj -> Adv blind nachvollziehen kann, sehe ich keinen natürlichen Zusammenhang zw. Präposition und Adjektiv.
Jul
30
comment »Die Tür ist auf« vs. »Die Tür ist offen«
"Alle diese Präpositionen werden als Adjektive verwendet. Warum auch nicht." - Ähhh, bitte was? "zu", beispielsweise, ist entweder eine Präposition oder ein Adjektiv, aber niemals ein "als Adjektiv verwendete Präposition".
Jul
30
comment »Reservierung für« oder »von«?
"Es gibt eine Reservierung" ist quite awkward. I don't know your context, but probably "Ich habe drei Zimmer reserviert" is what you want to say. In which case you don't even need a preposition.
Jul
30
comment “Ich wurde geboren” vs “Ich bin geboren”?
@chirlu He just provided the verbatim translations but didn't discuss whether or not they're correct in English (except for the first section). The last ones (have been) are totally wrong in English anyway. The middle ones (bin geboren / am born) is wrong in both languages (in standard language; in some regions they may say it though and claim it is correct, but it is not.)
Jul
29
comment What's the difference between “poppen” and “bumsen”?
Naja, darauf wollte ich hinaus, dass die ANtwort ein wenig über's Ziel hinausgeht. Ich habe von "budern" oder "pudern" noch nie was gehört. Klingt ehrlich gesagt aber sehr lustig. Ich stell mir das grad vor: "Ich hab meine Freundin gepudert." Haha... Das ist glaube ich der einzige Grund, warum ich den Begriff nicht bis morgen schon wieder vergessen haben werde.
Jul
29
comment What's the difference between “poppen” and “bumsen”?
What about "nageln", "pimpern", "bimsen", "bocken", "rammeln", ... ;)
Jul
29
comment How do I translate 'dirty cop'?
@CarstenSchultz True, because perhaps it's just a "dreckiger Polizist" who jumped into puddles, or because it's a "versauter Polizist" who has naughty thoughts. We don't know...
Jul
29
comment How do I translate 'dirty cop'?
@Wrzlprmft hahaha, I didn't suggest to remove the final question "is there anything better" ;)
Jul
29
comment Welcher Kasus in »überlässt das Töten wen/wem anderen«?
I hope I did understand the question correctly. Feel free to update the question anyway. Once your question states properly what the issue is, vote for reopen.
Jul
29
comment How do I translate 'dirty cop'?
"What does 'dirty cop' mean?" -> Wrong forum. Visit our sister site ELU. ;) – On a bit serious note, I think you should remove this question and instead state that you think "dirty" means "corrupt" and, thus, you think "korrupter Polizist" is a good translation.
Jul
28
comment Meaning of “ggf.” in this context
This is a minor mistake, pretty harmless. Should've been fixed in the very beginning, actually. Now it's too late. But your answer implies that there are severe issues. There aren't. So, yes. Even with a missing comma, a sentence can be considered sound. ("Sound" is defined as "in good condition", not "perfect".)
Jul
28
comment Reihe von Institutionen oder Reihe an Institutionen?
related: german.stackexchange.com/q/23350/1224
Jul
28
comment “Ich” and “mir” in the same phrase
It would've been a better idea to address @user16705 instead of me. He should be notified of your comment. – You're welcome all the same. ;)
Jul
28
comment Meaning of “ggf.” in this context
And the question's example is quite a sound sentence. There's just a comma missing. And the verb is not the best choice.
Jul
28
comment Meaning of “ggf.” in this context
I don't see a difference in meaning between your example and the one in the question. Frankly speaking, I think in both sentences (yours and in the question) the use of "ggf" is actually not a good choice.
Jul
28
comment Meaning of “ggf.” in this context
@Mac Fair enough. That could the crux of the matter. – However, what certainly missing is that she (apparently) knows the general meaning of "ggf" as stated in a comment to an answer only. At any rate, the question urgently needs an amendment.