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Apr
18
comment Wie kann man dem Kellner sagen, wieviel Trinkgeld man ihm gibt?
@Crissov Auf was runde ich denn auf, wenn ich 21€ zahlen muss? Ich gebe bestimmt nicht 30€.
Apr
15
comment What is the meaning of “Sie ist es immer noch”?
Ignore "immer" and try it again. I'm pretty sure, you'll then end up with the correct conclusion.
Apr
15
comment Which preposition to use for the phrase “to be studying at”?
Related, perhaps dupe: german.stackexchange.com/q/9704/1224
Apr
15
comment “Wovon” or “von wo”?
@Kay Oder mit "Wie", i.e. "Wie kommt's"
Apr
15
comment “Wovon” or “von wo”?
Depends on context. Both sentences are correct, but (can) have a different meaning. And the question word "woher" wouldn't be wrong per se, either.
Apr
13
comment What percentage of German words are nearly identical to English words?
I was looking for a term other than "formal", because "formal" wouldn't be quite correct either. Sometimes I look up an English word in a dictionary and it suggests the same word in German. German monolingual dictionaries second that it is a German word, but I've never heard it, much less used it. But I can also hardly think of any occupation where such a word would be a "technical term". I can't give you an example though, I always forget the words shortly after I looked them up.
Apr
13
comment What percentage of German words are nearly identical to English words?
In order to address your question, I don't think you can tell. That said, I guess it's around 80-90%. Technically, words that are of Germanic roots probably have a counterpart. Words based on Latin may exist in both languages, too, but there's a good chance that Germans do not know the word. Many Latin-based words are of a very high register or technical terms. Considering this and looking only at words that are used in everyday language, the percentage drops to maybe 20% or 30%. Or maybe still 50%?! :D
Apr
12
comment „Das ist der Grund, warum/weshalb …“
Im Schriftlichen ist manchmal so einiges abzuraten, aber nicht, weil es falsch ist, sondern weil es zu informell/umgangssprachlich ist. Wie das in dem konkreten Beispiel ist, weiß ich nicht, aber "falsch" ist es definitiv nicht.
Feb
26
comment In February, what does Oktober d.J. mean?
If the author is wise enough, he'd say "j. J." for "jenes Jahres" ;)
Feb
25
comment How do I talk about my parent's parent?
@CarstenS Yes, it is about the terms maternal and paternal. And so you're right that it is a dupe. german.stackexchange.com/q/9619/1224 ### german.stackexchange.com/q/9758/1224
Feb
25
comment How do I talk about my parent's parent?
@Takkat Who said "maternal father"? I didn't. But "maternal grandfather" equals "mother's father". So, using a dictionary would not only give you the term "mütterlichseits" but also a translation for "maternal grandfather" so that you can easily translate this to "mein Großvater mütterlichseits". So, what's your point?
Feb
25
comment How do I talk about my parent's parent?
You should have used a dictionary, looking up maternal or paternal. Clearly general reference.
Feb
25
comment How do I talk about my parent's parent?
There's not a single word but you can still express it. -1
Feb
22
comment “In eine Schule überwechseln” oder “an eine Schule überwechseln”?
@ThorstenDittmar Oh ja, das ist richtig. So gesehen, kann der Satz sogar dreideutig sein. Ich bin im Gebäude, ich bin auf dem Schulgelände, oder in sehr seltenen Ausnahmen (meinem Empfinden nach sehr selten, weil meistens mit "gehen" verwendet) ich gehe zur Schule, bin aber gerade nicht dort.
Feb
22
comment Why do we still use “Sie” even if the context is disrespectful?
First, it's not said frequently. However, if I use "Sie" this probably means that I'm not befriended with the other person and I don't like them. So, I don't want to address them with "Du".
Feb
22
comment “In eine Schule überwechseln” oder “an eine Schule überwechseln”?
Der letzte Satz ist nicht ganz klar."Ich gehe in die Schule" ist zweideutig. Es kann die Instutition meinen oder das Gebäude. "Ich bin in der Schule" ist recht eindeutig, weil in aller Regel das Gebäude gemeint wird (Kontext müsste klar machen, wenn es mal die Instutition ist). "Ich stehe an der Schule" ist eindeutig das Gebäude, insofern bezeichnet dies nicht immer die Instutition. — Auf den konkreten Satz bezogen ist der Kontext natürlich auch entscheidend. Aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach ist die Institution gemeint, daher ist "Ich will an eine andere/zu einer anderen Schule wechseln" richtig.
Feb
22
comment “In eine Schule überwechseln” oder “an eine Schule überwechseln”?
Und ich würde nur "wechseln" sagen, ohne "über-".
Feb
19
comment Wie würde man eine Person nennen, die äußerst glaubwürdig ist?
Noch ein paar weitere Wörter: "authentisch", "redlich"; eventuell "aufrichtig" noch.
Feb
19
comment Difference between “accusative” and “direct object”
@tofro Fair enough. If you dig into it more deeply, you'll talk about direct and indirect objects. On a superficial glance, you won't hear those terms at all. Even in school you don't talk about direct and indirect objects (I can't remember having heard those terms in my German classes).
Feb
18
comment Does “um” at times show the accurate time?
@Jan That's interesting. Thank you for the link.