16,412 reputation
22678
bio website n/a
location Germany
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 4 hours ago

I am a software engineer who is interested in improving his languages skills :)


Jul
30
comment Difference between “häufig”, “gewöhnlich” and “üblich”
@fluffy Yes and saying "Sie sind wie üblich gekommen" is fine. But that does not work for any word, as it wouldn't work in English either. In respect to that example, in German you cannot use "häufig" and in English you cannot use "often" without modifying the sentence a bit. That's what I'm saying.
Jul
30
comment Use of dative after “wegen”
Actually, @Emanuel is right, that this is a duplicate. That said, the accepted answer to the other question is not (entirely) correct. Many people would disagree with using dative being correct at all, so why recommend using dative.
Jul
30
comment What does “bleibt der Abwasch schon mal liegen” mean?
@user9065 Simplified: "schon mal" => "sometimes" (in that context)
Jul
30
comment Use of dative after “wegen”
@dirkt is right. The example sentence is clearly dative. You would recognize genitive. Also, in singular the newspaper editor would still go with dative.
Jul
28
comment What is the meaning of “Mensch” when used between friends or family members?
@Carlster Occasionally, yes. But I don't think it's the proper definition.
Jul
28
comment What is the meaning of “Mensch” when used between friends or family members?
@Carlster Tell me. I don't know what you mean.
Jul
28
comment Use of personal pronouns (including the polite forms)
@hellcode Oh yes, right. My second example is indeed wrong. I confused it with Spanish where the third-person conjugation is identical to the address pronoun. Never mind.
Jul
28
comment Use of personal pronouns (including the polite forms)
@hellcode I think you considered "Sie" als plural, otherwise your sentence is incorrect. In that case either "...ob sie Personal einstellen" or "...ob Sie Personal einstellt".
Jul
26
comment Use of the word “had” more than once in a statement in the German language
In oral speech you likely hear "...die er zuvor noch hatte". Your sentence, however, sounds like excerpt from a book or so and there you certainly use past perfect in both languages English and German. "gehabt hatte" is used–like "had had"–for things that happened in the past before something else in the past. A quick but terrible translation: "He was out of breath[past] and in contrast to the hurry earlier[some point before that], which he had had[past perfect!], he was now standing rooted in the open door[past].
Jul
26
comment Use of the word “had” more than once in a statement in the German language
It's the same as English "had had". But what's your question?
Jul
26
comment What are the resources to learn to pronouce words the right way?
@MathsLover I guess you hear a different recording. There are sometimes more than 1 recording. As you see in the screenshot, you can choose between which recording you want to listen to.
Jul
24
comment relative clauses and relative pronouns
What makes you believe that "den" is the relative pronoun. "den" is already in your original sentence "Mein Hund hat den Briefträger gebissen". The only thing which changed is that you replaced "Mein Hund" with "der", so obviously "der" must be the relative pronoun.
Jul
24
comment What are the resources to learn to pronouce words the right way?
Don't know the pronunciation from Pimsleur, but I'm pretty sure that it's fine. Can you provide an audio example? Google Translate pronunciation is OK, but not what I'd recommend.
Jul
24
comment What is the difference between “das Ergebnis” and “die Folge”?
Good catch. "Folge" indeed seems to be mainly used for negative consequences (so does the English word, too?). It's worth noting, however, that the verb "folgen" and the adverbs "folglich" and "infolgedessen" are not restricted to negative statements.
Jul
23
comment Best German expression for being metaphorically “rusty”
In deinem Basketball-Beispiel würde ich das so verstehen, dass dieser jemand selten bis nie Sport macht und ziemlich unfit ist.
Jul
23
comment best choice of words in requesting a reply to an email: zusenden, mitteilen
@Vogel612 "+100 - 2 hours ago - Association Bonus"
Jul
23
comment Wie drückt man aus, dass man sich falsch in dieser Welt fühlt?
@what Ich sehe kein Problem mit dem deutschen Satz. Einzige Alternative die mir in den Sinn kommt: passen. "Ich passe nicht hierhin".
Jul
23
comment Wie drückt man aus, dass man sich falsch in dieser Welt fühlt?
@Carlster Korrekt und ein Dativobjekt. Das deutsche benötigt auch ein Dativobjekt. In "Ich gehöre nicht hierhin" fehlt dieses.
Jul
23
comment Wie drückt man aus, dass man sich falsch in dieser Welt fühlt?
Korrigiere mich, wenn ich da falsch liege: Aber "I don't belong here" ist doch das englische Äquivalent zu "Ich gehöre nicht hierher". "Belong" equals "gehören" und hat zudem auch die doppelte Bedeutung ("belong to"->jdm gehören). Insofern kein Unterschied zwischen Englisch und Deutsch.
Jul
23
comment What is the difference between “nachvollziehen” and “verstehen”?
@userunknown Nichts. Hab auch nie behauptet, dass es falsch wäre. Das hast du mir grad in den Mund gelegt. Wie du dazu gekommen bist? Keine Ahnung. In meiner Antwort steht das jedenfalls nirgends. Deswegen: Bad Luck. Schönen Tag noch.