16,953 reputation
22780
bio website n/a
location Germany
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 1 hour ago

I am a software engineer who is interested in improving his languages skills :)


Oct
8
comment “Brg” at the end of emails
Why don't you ask your colleague?
Oct
1
comment Meaning correction of “unbefugtem Verlassen des Hauses”
It can not only refer to a person, it does refer to a person. The subject of the second part of the sentence is being left out, but from context you can guess who's meant.
Oct
1
comment Capitalization of “Recht”/“Unrecht” in “Du hast Recht/Unrecht”
korrekturen.de/kurz_erklaert/recht_haben_oder_recht_haben.shtml
Oct
1
comment “Schätzen”: How to differentiate between a guess and an estimation?
I wouldn't go with "Abschätzung". Would "Annäherung" work for you? Perhaps even "Approximation"?
Sep
30
comment What are differences between “fließend” and “verhandlungssicher”?
So many errors. I failed to improve this answer. And I'm not sure if it is correct at all–I can't tell because I don't understand.
Sep
30
comment Wohin/wo sind denn die Kinder gelaufen?
@Emanuel Es gibt so Momente, wo mir nicht mal ein passendes Wort im Deutschen einfällt, und dann entstehen ganz lustige englische Ausdrücke ;) Ich glaub jetzt ist's aber treffender.
Sep
30
comment Verbs that are both separable and inseparable
Not only related, but also duplicate. Bummer that I cannot vote for close on a question with an open bounty.
Sep
29
comment “Finder will be rewarded” in German?
It's better to pick the most important words (finder, reward) and you'll find the answer by using Google and/or dictionaries: Pons, dict.cc
Sep
29
comment Use of Konjunktiv I in “es sei denn, …”
"Es sei denn" -> "unless", "except". – It introduces a specific situation where the preceding statement is not true. "The grind will always be the last person, except everyone is a grind." Funny enough that even then a grind will be the last one. ;)
Sep
24
comment When does “war” change to “wäre gewesen” rather than just “wäre” in the conditional?
Apart: for the present tense, your first sentence would be correct if it reads "Wenn sie gesund wäre, bräuchte sie die Ärztin nicht" or "..., würde sie die Ärztin nicht brauchen"
Sep
24
comment Is “es gibt” not used as often as the English “there is”?
How often do you use "there is"? – I don't think that there's objective analysis done.
Sep
24
comment Difference between “umgezogen” and “verzogen”
Nice collection. I doubt that any questions about ziehen are left over. Some further, just for reference: herziehen, zusammenziehen. Different: vorziehen.
Sep
23
comment When article can be left out for countable nouns
In that case "Aufgabe" is not really something countable. It's kind of generic term; and it rather applies to "duty" than to "task". For that reason, no article.
Sep
19
comment Meaning of “Klatsche”
As you already mentioned some collocations, I'd just like to add another one: "eine Klatsche kassieren"
Sep
18
comment What does “inf” mean in German dictionaries?
Danke, jetzt hab ich es auch verstanden :)
Sep
18
comment What does “inf” mean in German dictionaries?
Wofür ist denn der Edit gut?
Sep
18
comment How to ask German student to homecoming?
@Milchgesicht Das bedeute, dass "Absolvententreffen" und "Ehemaligentreffen" nicht nur eine schlechte, sondern gar falsche Übersetzung ist?! – Eine "Ersties-Party" ist es dann aber auch nicht wirklich?!
Sep
18
comment How to ask German student to homecoming?
Ich denke @CarstenSchultz hat hier eher an Konjunktiv als an Präteritum gedacht. Persönlich würde ich ja "...begleiten würdest." verwenden, vor allen Dingen unter der Betrachtung, dass es die "very politely"-Form ist.
Sep
18
comment How to ask German student to homecoming?
dict.cc suggests "Absolvententreffen", but not sure this is really a good match.
Sep
17
comment Meaning/Origination of “lange nicht so”
Don't expect the literal translation to make sense! Get a grasp on the meaning and find an appropriate translation, not to freely/loosely but also not to literally. – Besides, there are more ways to say that in German, for instnace: "Er verdient bei weitem nicht so viel", "Er verdient nicht annährend so viel".