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location Germany
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 14 hours ago

I am a software engineer who is interested in improving his languages skills :)


Apr
5
comment Preposition “in”: what article to use if the following noun is masculine?
For what possible reason should the preposition depends on the gender?
Apr
4
comment What does “endgeil” mean in German?
german.stackexchange.com/q/10106/1224 - duden.de/rechtschreibung/endgeil
Apr
4
comment What is the etymology of “sau-”?
Aber in sauber steckt doch sau- drin. Just kidding, sorry.
Apr
4
comment What is the etymology of “sau-”?
Saurichtig. Aber mir fehlt noch, warum gerade die Sau – und nicht vielleicht die Kuh, das Pferd, ...?
Apr
4
comment “Gateway language” to German
There's no other language that can help you much. Knowing Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and Icelandic won't give you a lot. You already speak English, which is still close to German in many aspects. Good for you. Dutch has been mentioned but I seriously doubt that it helps you (in respect to understanding).
Apr
3
comment What is the etymology of Gelegenheit?
I think the most significant part is "Aus ‘nahe gelegen, benachbart’ entwickelt sich die Bedeutung ‘bequem, passend’." which you, unfortunately, haven't quoted, although you highlighted the meaning passend.
Apr
3
comment How to say “now a days…” / “nowadays” in German?
As you mentioned zurzeit (which is correct), I feel it's important to link to the question What is the difference between “zurzeit” and “zur Zeit”?.
Apr
2
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@Emanuel Ich glaube, wir drehen uns im Kreis. Aber ich denke, wir verstehen beide die Argumente des anderen, deswegen bin ich dafür, das jetzt so stehen zu lassen. So, ich bin dann jetzt mal spazierend.
Apr
2
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@Emanuel Und da wiederspreche ich. "Schreiend", "sagend", "fahrend" usw. ergeben auch keinen Sinn. Man kann nicht jedes Partizip 1 verwenden. Worin erkennst du (als LL) den Unterschied?
Apr
2
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@Emanuel Fair enough. Aber in deinem Eingangskommentar fehlte die Erklärung. Und ich bezweifle, dass jeder LanguageLearner auf Anhieb den Unterschied zw. gehend und nervend erkennt. (Das gleiche gilt auch für's Englische: "He is going" vs "He is irritating". Grammatikalisch zwei paar Schuhe, optisch dasselbe. Und im Deutschen ist eines von beiden halt falsch. Wer von der Grammatik wenig Ahnung hat, könnte hier Probleme bei der Übersetzung bekommen.
Apr
2
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@Emanuel Nur, dass du mich nicht falsch verstehst. Ich bin in dem Punkt etwas pingelig, damit potentielle zukünftige Leser(=LanguageLearners) nicht den Eindruck gewinnen, dass "Er ist gehend" nur zufällig bedeutungslos ist, da die Grammatik ja ansonsten richtig ist (was dein Kommentar suggeriert).
Apr
2
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@Emanuel Interestingly, if you search the Internet you find both, statements that say the present participle is used for the progressive tense and statements that claim the present participle just happens to be equal to the verb-form in the progressive aspect. Note that you also distinguish between gerund and participle, although there's no difference in spelling. I think you'll find valid arguments for both thesis.
Apr
2
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@Emanuel Well, assuming gehend would be a participle adjective, the sentence is indeed grammatically correct. However, in this context it's rather a literal translation of the English progressive aspect which is ungrammatical in German.
Apr
1
comment Weak masculine nouns
Not quite. My point actually was that the genitive case is clearly distinguishable. However, if the link in the answer below is correct, you just take a look at the declension table and look for 7 -n endings (still, they don't say that the nominative singular must end in -e, for instance Astronaut). Actually, in conclusion that seconds my first comment.
Apr
1
comment Weak masculine nouns
I guess you should rather take a look at the genitive ending (des Präsidenten, des Helden – des Namens, des Glaubens)
Apr
1
comment How do I say in german “car parking fine lawyer”?
I assume you've got the words you listed from a dictionary? You could optimize your search by using a dictionary which put the words into groups, i.e. categorize them. Then you would know, that "fein" is the translation for the adjective "fine", meaning very good, and not the noun as used in your context.
Apr
1
comment What does “machste halt was” mean?
Well, short forms and idioms are not mutually exclusive. I'd consider "tu was" more common. However, from what I learned searching the Internet, the phrase in question seems to be common in Northern parts of Germany and I can't speak for that region.
Apr
1
comment Can wissen mean remember?
@frlan I'd rather think it depends on context. "Weißt du noch, um wieviel Uhr ..." would sound slightly odd with "erinnern", but "Erinnerst du dich noch an den Tag..." would sound absolutely off with "wissen"
Apr
1
comment Dies vs Diese - what is the rule to follow
In your last example, it's simply a demonstrative pronoun (I know that you know that, but you haven't mentioned it). Demonstrative pronouns and demonstrative adjectives are usually not just dies. But in some instances the neuter pronoun dieses is replaced with dies though. However, when referring to an abstract thing you rather go with dies. "Ich wollte deine Ideen umsetzen, dies ist mir jedoch nicht gelungen." Using dieses here would be possible though.
Mar
30
comment What does “machste halt was” mean?
I'd be interested into a context when to use it. Doesn't sound very idiomatic to me.