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May
27
comment Individuell/Individual- and Generell/General- Phenomena
I don't see why this is a horrible inconsequence. "Generalprobe" is not derived from "generell" but both "General..." and "generell" share–of course–their origin in Genus
May
26
comment Bedeuten “anhören” und “zuhören” dasselbe?
Ich würde nicht so weit gehen und behaupten, dass "zuhören" in dem Kontext nicht verwendet wird. Ich würde nicht mal sagen, dass es weniger gängig ist. Ich höre bei Diskussion im Nachbarbüro oft nur "zu", weil ich einfach nicht weghören kann ;)
May
26
comment Einzahl oder Mehrzahl verwenden, wenn beides im Satz vorher vorkommt?
Wenn du den Satz wiefolg im Kopf liest, dann verwendest du "ist", sonst "sind": "Physik–einschließlich ihrer Anwendungen zur Lösung quantitativer Problemstellungen–ist meine Leidenschaft.
May
26
comment Difference between “zurzeit” and “bis jetzt”
Who claims that "bis jetzt" means "currently". I can't find any dictionary stating this.
May
23
comment Adjektivierung eines Nomens, das schon mit einem Adjektiv begleitet ist
Wenn es die "mathematische Physik" ist und es um ein Thema der mathematischen Physik geht, so ist es ein "mathematisch physikalisches Thema", ohne Bindestrich. Denn das Thema gehört nur zur Physik, womit nur "physikalisch" ein Adjektiv sein darf. "Mathematisch" ist dann wiederum ein Adverb, dass dann "physikalisch" nochmals genauer beschreibt. Oder? Hast du zu deiner These irgendeinen Beleg oder Erörterung?
May
23
comment Adjektivierung eines Nomens, das schon mit einem Adjektiv begleitet ist
possible duplicate of Grammaticality of "original italienisches Eis"
May
23
comment What's the difference between ,,drohen“ (dat.) and ,,bedrohen” (acc.)?
"Ich bedrohe dich." isn't passive.
May
23
comment How can 'loss function' be translated?
Both terms "Kostenfunktion" and "Verlustfunktion" are in use. The former one is way more common. I think it depends on "how you look at it". And, apart, "Verlustfunktion" sounds quite a bit negative.
May
23
comment Article when referring to noun in genitive case
@Hulk Oh right. Fair enough. This is idiomatic, too.
May
23
comment Confusion with this ad by DB. Is it possible to omit the verb?
@c.p. I see your point. However, it's been mentioned in other answers, too, thus I felt I had to make this comment here. – After recent changes, your answer is very good and complete imho.
May
23
comment “vor Kurzem” with capital “K”
I claim, "vor Kurzem" it not the modern variant, although it was "legitimized" recently
May
23
comment Article when referring to noun in genitive case
@Hulk I don't think so. The way it is written now, is the most likely one by any German. Perhaps, drop that final part and picture the full sentence would be "...an der Spitze eines neuen Gremiums". Now, what would be your question to get further information about the "Gremium". You would ask "An der Spitze von wem?". You would not ask "An der Spitze wessen?" – Which brings us back to the original question. Why dative here. I think both "answers" do not answer it yet.
May
23
comment Confusion with this ad by DB. Is it possible to omit the verb?
Some of the answers claim that it's only allowed in newspapers or such. That's not true. It's very common in everyday speech, too.
May
23
comment Article when referring to noun in genitive case
In OP's sentence you could even argue for nominative. "... an der Spitze eines neues Gremiums; (das ist) der Rat für..."
May
23
comment Article when referring to noun in genitive case
@Hulk Ironically, if that would be true*, you'd say "...an der Spitze von einem neuen Gremium, dem Rat...". So, the actual question here is: why do you use genitive first and then switch to dative. – *Actually, it is true, but it's not the answer for everything.
May
22
comment Welche Bedeutung haben die Farben in dieser Karte?
@c.p. UK ist verbuggt... i.stack.imgur.com/Vegn1.png
May
22
comment Welche Bedeutung haben die Farben in dieser Karte?
@elena >! Ja, kann man.
May
22
comment Webwörter neu erfinden - Für google, duckduckgo, photoshop
"to google" = googlen // "to photoshop" = photoshoppen // "to duck it" = ducken – However, the last one won't be ever used. The search engine is quite old but it's not in use.
May
22
comment Which article do we use for countable units of uncountable things?
"for some countable nouns, it is plural in some cases" -> not for some, but for all of them.
May
22
comment Usage of 'leid sein'
"As often as its English equivalent" -> How often is it used in English?