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May
23
comment Article when referring to noun in genitive case
In OP's sentence you could even argue for nominative. "... an der Spitze eines neues Gremiums; (das ist) der Rat für..."
May
23
comment Article when referring to noun in genitive case
@Hulk Ironically, if that would be true*, you'd say "...an der Spitze von einem neuen Gremium, dem Rat...". So, the actual question here is: why do you use genitive first and then switch to dative. – *Actually, it is true, but it's not the answer for everything.
May
22
comment Welche Bedeutung haben die Farben in dieser Karte?
@c.p. UK ist verbuggt... i.stack.imgur.com/Vegn1.png
May
22
comment Welche Bedeutung haben die Farben in dieser Karte?
@elena >! Ja, kann man.
May
22
comment Webwörter neu erfinden - Für google, duckduckgo, photoshop
"to google" = googlen // "to photoshop" = photoshoppen // "to duck it" = ducken – However, the last one won't be ever used. The search engine is quite old but it's not in use.
May
22
comment Which article do we use for countable units of uncountable things?
"for some countable nouns, it is plural in some cases" -> not for some, but for all of them.
May
22
comment Usage of 'leid sein'
"As often as its English equivalent" -> How often is it used in English?
May
21
comment Müssen auch Muttersprachler die Artikel der Nomen lernen?
@karoshi Bestimmte bitte das biologische Geschlecht eines Löffels. Für mich ist es "sächlich", "neutrum". Im Deutschen jedoch "männlich", im Spanischen "weiblich".
May
21
comment Different words for cleaning
You'll find some further information about putzen and reinigen here. I suggest reading the second (older) article first.
May
21
comment How do you ask for the meaning of a word in German?
If you google for "ask for word meaning in German" you find this question here now. So, your statement isn't valid any more :D
May
21
comment Different words for cleaning
Could you please provide some research! What did you find out? What's still unclear after your research. – In order to answer your question: There's no difference at all. It's basically just about register, and–maybe–one of those word may be used in a particular context only (I mean collocations). Not sure about this; but this wouldn't help you anyways.
May
21
comment Müssen auch Muttersprachler die Artikel der Nomen lernen?
@ThorstenDittmar Nein, "Nutella" und "Jogurt" ist ein ganz anderes Paar Schuhe. In beiden Fällen gibt es – je nachdem wo man genau lebt – sowieso eine andere "richtige" Antwort. Jogurt kann je nach Region zum Beispiel auch 'weiblich' sein. Ich habe aber für diese beiden Wörter noch nie ein Dictionary zu Rate ziehen müssen und kann dir so sagen: Es ist die Nutella und der Jogurt. Da werden mir aber nicht alle Deutschen zu stimmen.
May
20
comment What does “Da kommt sein Schiff an eine kleine Insel” mean?
Well, I made some further changes. Although my changeset looks like I changed everything, it's actually not too much. You might take a look at it; if you disagree, feel free to rollback. – However, there's still missing some context! It won't really affect the answers, but I think it belongs into the question at any rate.
May
19
comment Article with dates necessary?
In the first sentence, I would repeat "dem": "zwischem dem 1. Feb und dem 15. Mar". I don't think that it ever works without an article (for these examples; there might be some use cases where you can drop them, but I can't think of any right now).
May
19
comment “To know somebody” as in “have knowledge of”
The closest translation–according to the dictionary–is "wissen" or "kennen". You ask for "have knowledge of" and Pons suggest "know (have information/knowledge): wissen, kennen". If you scroll down to the "recognize"-part and look at the examples, you'd see that they have nothing in common with your examples here. That is, "erkennen" is clearly wrong here. It's still valid for a different context. "Do you recognize her on this picture?" -> "Erkennst du sie auf diesem Bild?"
May
19
comment How does the current usage of Futur I sound to native German speakers?
"When you indicate a time, you can (should? not sure) use the present instead" -> Almost. What matters is whether you're talking about something very soon or further away and how reliable that is. "Morgen gehe ich in die Schule. Nächstes Jahr werde ich zur Uni gehen." Tomorrow is very soon and it's pretty sure that you'll go to school (if you're not catching a cold). Next year is further away and there still may be some reservations about it being true. (You might decide different, you might not finish school, whatever...)
May
18
comment Correct translation of “my father taught me to play football”?
@WalterTross In my opinion, there's no other connotation and it clearly indicates that your father taught you how to play football. If you're unsure, however, you could say "Mein Vater hat mir beigebracht, wie man Fußball spielt."
May
18
comment Correct translation of “my father taught me to play football”?
Germans use simple past quite rarely...
May
18
comment Position of “nicht” and object
Related (if not duplicate): german.stackexchange.com/q/5437/1224 - german.stackexchange.com/q/1101/1224
May
17
comment Relative clauses and the dative case
I didn't know that you speak Dutch, but clausule is supposed to be clause, isn't it? Furthermore, you did the same typo twice (copy & paste, I guess). It's sie not si ;)