Reputation
22,043
Next tag badge:
108/100 score
19/20 answers
Badges
2 33 94
Newest
 Enlightened
Impact
~363k people reached

May
15
comment Was ist der Unterschied zwischen einem Subjunktiv und dem Konjunktiv?
"Es wäre falsch anzunehmen, dass es neben Indikativ und Konjunktiv noch einen dritten Modus gäbe" -> Gibt es aber doch. Der nennt sich Imperativ. Und in anderen Sprachen gibt's noch weitere Modi, zum Beispiel den Optativ.
May
15
comment Subjunctive I for recommendation?
You didn't read the comments to the other answer. You should also take a look at a recent question regarding subjunctive. The word "conjunctive" in English means something entirely different and is a false friend with German "Konjunktiv". The grammatical mood "Konjunktiv" is expressed with the word "subjunctive" in English. That is, in the German language there is a subjunctive, although it's different (if similar) to the Spanish "subjuntivo". If you really want to go with "conjunctive", I'd recommend saying "conjunctive mood" at least.
May
14
comment Was ist der Unterschied zwischen einem Subjunktiv und dem Konjunktiv?
...Im Deutschen gibt es keinen Subjunktiv. D.h. bzgl. der deutschen Grammatik, dass es keinen Unterschied zw. Subjunktiv und Konjunktiv gibt, da ersteres als (schlechte) Übersetzung für den eigentlichen Konjunktiv dienen kann. Das englische subjunctive ist im Bezug auf dt. Grammatik immer der Konjunktiv. Im Bezug auf spanischer Grammatik denke ich (ich weiß es nicht), ist es immer der Subjunktiv.
May
14
comment Was ist der Unterschied zwischen einem Subjunktiv und dem Konjunktiv?
Wenn du dich auf den deutschen Konjunktiv beziehst und ihn auf Englisch ausdrücken möchtest, ist es der subjunctive. Mit der englischen Grammatik kenne ich mich nur bedingt aus, und der deutsche Konjunktiv unterscheidet sich definitiv vom Englischen "subjunctive", daher mag ich nichts über die Definition subjunctive bzgl. des Englischen sage. Klar ist nur, dass im Spanischen (c.p. kann bestimmt näher drauf eingehen) nochmal von etwas anderem die Rede ist, wenn gleich auch ähnlich. ... to be continued
May
14
comment Den Substantiv (AKK) -(e)n
Fast. Auffällig ist, dass alle deine Beispiele männlich sind. Das hat einen Grund, denn für alle anderen Nomen stimmt deine Aussage nicht. "Ich sehe das Appartment - Ich nehme das Medikament - Ich lehne mich an die Wand - Ich pflanze die Saat". – Stichwort: N-Deklination
May
14
comment Subjunctive I for recommendation?
As far as I know–but I might be totally wrong on that–German doesn't have something like a "real" subjunctive. Such a subjunctive exists in the Spanish language (Subjuntivo). The German Konjunktiv does not exist in Spanish. – However, both are not too different and are often (incorrectly) considered equal.
May
14
comment Subjunctive I for recommendation?
@c.p. Yes, you're right. The German word "Konjunktiv" is translated with "subjunctive". The English word "conjunctive" is a false friend. "Subjunktiv" in German isn't quite used but it would mean the same thing.
May
14
comment “von Beruf” but not “Beruf von”?
Note, I fixed the declination errors as they weren't related to the question.
May
14
comment verb for “look up a word”
Any of these words is appropriate.
May
14
comment Komparativ gewisser Adjektivisierungen
You might be interested into this article on canoonet
May
13
comment When to use “circa” or “ungefähr”?
Note that I was proved wrong on my initial assumption. According to the corpus circa is used more often as I thought–even in Germany. –– Interestingly, your first example doesn't sound that bad to me. The other two are an absolute disaster to my ear, although the last one refers to a number (number of people) and should be valid according to my answer. I really get the feeling the use of these words varies a lot depending on the region you're living.
May
13
comment When to use “circa” or “ungefähr”?
@bwoebi Thank you very much for this hint. You are right. Checking the corpus again, including zirka and ca., showed that this word is far more frequent than ungefähr and I stand corrected. My initial assumption proved wrong.
May
13
comment Why 'der' in 'Danke der Nachfrage'?
@konkret "Ich danke den Käufern für was? - Für die Nachfrage" Otherwise "die Nachfrage" is incorrect. You don't say "Danke (jemanden) die Nachfrage".
May
12
comment Why 'der' in 'Danke der Nachfrage'?
@WalterTross Just curious. What is the reason you asking this?
May
12
comment What is the difference between “losfahren” and “losgehen”?
Die Fahrt geht los, sobald alle Fahrgäste eingestiegen sind. – "Losgehen" also contains the meaning of "to begin". However, it must be associated with some kind of action, activity, or event; and a bus driver is certainly not the correct sort of noun to represent such a thing.
May
12
comment 'gemeinsam' vs. 'beisammen' vs. 'zusammen' vs. 'miteinander'
Apart, you're right when saying that "beisammen" is the least common word. Here are the data taken from a corpus: beisammen 1083, zusammen 116824, gemeinsam 67654, miteinander 19837
May
12
comment Why 'der' in 'Danke der Nachfrage'?
Funny enough, right now you've got two correct answers and two wrong answers but only four people considered the question an upvote worth. :)
May
12
comment Why 'der' in 'Danke der Nachfrage'?
@Livius The Duden page you linked to doesn't give any hint on whether it's genitive or dative.
May
11
comment Why 'der' in 'Danke der Nachfrage'?
In an answer to a related question, I already addressed your question.
May
9
comment Wie sagt man urinieren und defäkieren in der Kindersprache?
Interessante Kindersprache...