15,017 reputation
22569
bio website n/a
location Germany
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 29 mins ago

I am a software engineer who is interested in improving his languages skills :)


Jul
1
comment When does one use “von” and when “durch” to form the passive?
Actually, upon further reflection it seems to be more complicated than I thought in the first place. Both "von" and "durch" can be used with wind. "Die Blätter wurden vom[durch den] Wind aufgewirbelt." I'm not sure if this is just a matter of style but the active voice is the same "Der Wind wirbelt die Blätter auf." At this point I realize that the question is very tricky. Are both correct? Is one of them just colloquial but wrong from a grammatical point of view? I don't know.
Jul
1
comment When does one use “von” and when “durch” to form the passive?
Sure. When I get time for this I'll have a look at this. May take a couple of days though.
Jul
1
comment When does one use “von” and when “durch” to form the passive?
I think this point needs further research. I don't know what it really is. Well, it's the agent for sure. But it's not an instrument or "Mittel" (means?). But though the preposition is "durch". --- My own intuition is that this is a thing you don't need a language feel and one of the few things where you can put the whole problem into rules without exception.
Jul
1
comment When does one use “von” and when “durch” to form the passive?
Furthermore, if you say that durch indicates "the instrument through which someone acted", I'm not sure if this makes clear what preposition is to use for, e.g., "by the wind (storm)". Wind (storm) is actually not a instrument through someone acted. But you also cannot say that the wind (storm) "actively acts" as it is not a person. So, for what reason do we go with "durch" rather than "von"?
Jul
1
comment When does one use “von” and when “durch” to form the passive?
"can't think of a better word" -> Because agent is the right term for this.
Jun
27
comment What's the difference between “tun” and “antun”?
+10 if I could. --- "I cannot think of a scenario where they would be interchangeable." -> duden.de/rechtschreibung/antun#Bedeutung1a This is the only thing where they are quite close. To my ear it sounds somewhat stilted though. --- "somewhat often but rather informally used" -> this is the figurative use of your previous point
Jun
27
comment What's the difference between “tun” and “antun”?
Did you look them up in a dictionary (monolingual and/or bilingual). They do have a small overlap but other than this they are easy to distinguish.
Jun
27
comment Nach Hackfleischspieß Art?
Darf's auch ein Schnitzel (nach) Wiener Art sein?
Jun
24
comment Difference between “ihr” and “dessen”
I think that pointing at them does not influence the word-choice at all.
Jun
24
comment Difference between “ihr” and “dessen”
Actually, the sentence "Sie haben ihre Freunde und ihren Sohn eingeladen" is very clear. They invited their own son.
Jun
24
comment Ist die Redewendung “das mache ich mit links” diskriminierend?
@chirlu Oups, ich schreibe mit rechts, aber springe mit links. Was ist jetzt meine "nichtdominante Körperseite"?
Jun
22
comment Associate the possessive adjective to a neutral noun
@martina From a grammatical point of view it's correct to go with the masculine gender. In colloquial speech, however, it's very common to neglect this rule if talking about female people, namely "Mädchen" or "Kind". I'd even highly recommend to do so as it is very awkward to refer to a girl as "him".
Jun
22
comment Associate the possessive adjective to a neutral noun
I think it's worth to mention that this follows the same pattern for the missing neuter indefinite article. "Das Mädchen" is "Ein Mädchen" and "Das Stück Brot" ist "Ein Stück Brot".
Jun
22
comment Written vs. Spoken German
From a grammatical point of view, you don't need to care about written German as long as you don't write a novel. - About preterit vs perfect in spoken language, it's pretty hard to tell when to use which. It's language feel. Sometimes it's perfectly fine to say "Er hat gesagt" and in other cases native will rather go with "Er sagte". You could write a novel about this ;) The big difference between spoken and written languages are basically word-choices and colloquial expressions. And of course dialects but I guess this is obvious.
Jun
21
comment Regel für Abtrennung des Vornamens vom vorangestellten Nachnamen
Siehe auch: de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphabetische_Sortierung
Jun
14
comment Vergessen = “to forget” AND “to forget about”?
Die Frage war in Deutsch gestellt. Magst du deine Antwort übersetzen?
Jun
12
comment Are German people always sure about the declension of a noun?
Das Problem an "Kann ich einen Apfel", dass da ja auch gar kein Vollverb drin. Wie soll man da auch, was der Sprecher?
Jun
12
comment Are German people always sure about the declension of a noun?
@chirlu This is what I meant that people sometimes don't know the gender. While people most times refer to a sign, which is neuter, they do not know that the shield is masculine.
Jun
12
comment Are German people always sure about the declension of a noun?
Regarding "Bank": Still, this does not confuse native Germans.
Jun
12
comment Are German people always sure about the declension of a noun?
In one word: Yes. - In more words, 'yes' if we know the gender of the word. A few words do have a different gender as most German believe.