395 reputation
313
bio website niederberger-berlin.net
location Germany
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Nov 1 at 9:59

Ich bin weder Deutsch-Lernender noch -Lehrender sondern lediglich interessierter Muttersprachler.

Ich kann die Lektüre des Blogs des Sprachwissenschaftler Anatol Stefanowitsch allen Sprachinteressierten ans Herz legen.


May
11
comment Why is “Fräulein” considered offensive, as opposed to “Frau”?
@Dominik Wikipedia also mentions that “Fräulein” is considered sexist. And in this “study” - which actually is an Allensbach poll -- only 10% say “Idiot” is disgusting and 71% use the word themselves. So what does that mean now? Is “idiot” not offensive anymore? BTW: the numbers you mention are men and women together. From this poll it is absolutly unclear what women think.
May
10
comment Why is “Fräulein” considered offensive, as opposed to “Frau”?
What does it mean a word is not offensive “per se“? This is true for so many offensive words that it has no meaning at all! “Esel” isn't offensive, is it? (“Du Esel!”) I can even use “Tee” in an offensive way: “Du bist so fad wie eine Tasse Tee.” You don't have to agree with me about the quality of tea (and I could actually like tea) to read the last sentence as an offence. The important point is that many women feel offended by “Fräulein” which is what it makes offensive in most contexts (unlike “Tee”).
May
6
comment Was ist die Bedeutung des Wortes “der Papiermillionär”?
Hab ich ja noch nie gehört... man lernt nie aus
May
3
comment Milch? Milsh? Why the pronunciation difference?
It could also be a case of hypercorrection. At least both the German and the English Wikipedia mention the ç/ʃ confusion.
May
3
comment Gibt es ein eigenes Wort für beschmutztes Geschirr?
Wenn ich „den Abwasch mache“, produziere ich aber kein dreckiges Geschirr, sondern ganz im Gegenteil reduziere es. Und „Du hast zu viel Abwasch in Deinem Zimmer.“ klingt auch irgendwie falsch... :)
May
3
comment Komma vor “und” bei Aufzählungen mit Mehrdeutigkeit
Das sogenannte „Oxford Comma“ oder „Serial Comma“ wird übrigens (laut Wikipedia) nur im Amerikanischen Englisch, nicht aber im Britischen Englisch verwendet: „It is used less often in British English, where it is standard usage to leave it out.“
Apr
27
revised 4711, 08/15 and other numbers with some flair in German?
turned web addresses into hyperlinks
Apr
27
suggested suggested edit on 4711, 08/15 and other numbers with some flair in German?
Apr
27
comment What are the differences in punctuation between German and English?
This is called the “Harvard Comma”, “Oxford Comma” or “Serial Comma” and is AFAIK mostly used in the USA in non-journalistic writing.
Apr
26
awarded  Civic Duty
Apr
26
comment How rude is “Quatsch!”?
I regurlarly use “Nee, Quatsch!” in front of students, however always because I said something stupid right before (e.g. “33 weniger 24 ist 8... Quatsch! 9!”). I wouldn't do it if I thought it'd be rude.
Apr
24
comment Wird Hochdeutsch relativ schnell gesprochen?
Ich habe keinerlei Fakten, die als solche durchgehen würden. Mein Gefühl als gebürtiger Schwabe mit Freunden aus Niedersachsen, Berlin, Freiburg -- also quer durch die Republik -- behauptet, dass sich die Sprechgeschwindigkeiten nicht sonderlich unterscheiden...
Apr
23
comment What is the meaning of (the perhaps swisswide used) “resonieren”
I disagree that to people clapping hands at the same time are resonating. But besides that: in the quote given it is not very probable that “resonieren” is meant. It is very likely spelt this way to mimick the Swiss dialect, just the way “sälber” (=selber) and “foht” (=fängt) are...
Apr
23
comment What is the meaning of (the perhaps swisswide used) “resonieren”
“resonieren“ is a word used in physics and music (the Duden is with me here). I cannot imagine any case where it would mean “respond”. And although I don't know the song I can't imagine anything like “der Meister fängt an mitzuschwingen” (=zu resonieren) could be meant...
Apr
23
comment Typographische Konvention zum bis-Strich in der Fraktur
Die Beispiel dienen lediglich zur Veranschaulichung der Verwendung des „Bis-Strich“ in einer Fraktur-Schrift. Erster Satz: „Lesen Sie die Seiten 35–68.“ Zweiter Satz: „Die berühmten Anfangsworte im Johannes-Evangelium in Kapitel 1, Vers 1–5.“
Apr
23
comment What does it mean when my friend comes up to me and says “Na”?
@Em1 Yes, I know this usage of “Na?” as well. I tend to use “Na?” as a greeting only with people I know use it the same way (and of course only at the beginning of a conversation). Else I try to add what I mean by “Na?”, for instance “Na? Wie gehts?”.
Apr
23
comment What does it mean when my friend comes up to me and says “Na”?
Nowadays though, I often have phone calls with the caller starting “Hallo <Name>. Na?” and the called responding “Na.”
Apr
23
comment Typographische Konvention zum bis-Strich in der Fraktur
@Gigili Meinen Sie die Beispiele in Fraktur? Oder das Zitat?
Apr
23
comment What does it mean when my friend comes up to me and says “Na”?
Until I was twenty I only knew “Na?” with the meaning “How are you?”. That's the way we used it in Swabia. Then I got to know people from Northern Germany who used it as “Hi” or “Hello” and the like. This led to some confusion... What I mean to say: there might be different meanings depending on the region?!
Apr
23
answered Typographische Konvention zum bis-Strich in der Fraktur