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Jan
3
comment What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
@userunknown: It might seem so, but it is not. The "Anschluss" was an annexion, not a voluntary link-up. To prevent exactly the kind of honest mistake you just made (thhinking this is just a harmless ordinary word instead of a term made up by propaganda to distort the truth), we put the word in quotation marks when using it as a technical term with the meaning "the unification of Germany and Austria in 1938". See also the German Wikipedia article, where they also put quotes around the term.
Jan
3
revised Does using the pronouns “sie” and “er” when refering to objects sound odd to native German speakers?
added practical advice
Jan
3
comment Does using the pronouns “sie” and “er” when refering to objects sound odd to native German speakers?
Your suggested sentence is excellent practical advice in this case, though, and also my favorite version. bernd_k's answer provides insight as to why the reflexive use of schauen is preferable in this case.
Jan
3
comment Does using the pronouns “sie” and “er” when refering to objects sound odd to native German speakers?
You are right, in this case it does sound slightly odd - just not due to the pronoun, in my opinion, but due to the duplication of the word "Sie/sie". Maybe I should edit to make this more clear?
Jan
3
comment Does using the pronouns “sie” and “er” when refering to objects sound odd to native German speakers?
Yes, but you didn't answer the question: Does using the pronouns "sie" and "er" when referring to objects sound odd? Both your odd and non-odd examples use the "sie" pronoun.
Jan
3
comment Does using the pronouns “sie” and “er” when refering to objects sound odd to native German speakers?
This is true, but probably better as a comment, since it doesn't answer the actual question.
Jan
3
answered Does using the pronouns “sie” and “er” when refering to objects sound odd to native German speakers?
Jan
3
revised What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
removed a bracket
Jan
3
comment What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
@userunknown: I would not use quotation marks in other contexts, but it is advisable to use them when talking about the forced unification of 1938, just as it is when using words such as "Reichskristallnacht" etc. - to distance yourself from the euphemism.
Jan
2
comment What is the best way to translate “To do list”?
To-Do-Liste and Aufgabenliste are the most common ones. You can use either.
Jan
2
comment What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
@Tom I edited my answer to hopefully clarify.
Jan
2
revised What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
added 189 characters in body
Jan
2
comment What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
@Tom: If somebody called a potential marriage an "Anschluss", that would probably be a jibe playing with the political meaning (and as such, bad taste, IMHO). I can't imagine a native german speaker calling a marriage or other civil union an Anschluss. One could call it a Zusammenschluss. (Somebody unaware of the connotation might clumsily refer to an unequal merger of companies or clubs as an Anschluss of the smaller one to the larger one)
Jan
2
comment What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
@Andrew, I think the Zyklon naming by Siemens was a blooper. No one in their right mind would do that. Anschluss, however, is a perfectly normal word meaning attachment, connection, link. Nobody would take note if you were to connect your oven to a Gas-Anschluss (though there are more correct and more beautiful ways to say this, the verb anschließen would probably feature in all of them).
Jan
2
comment What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
@splattne: I disagree with the second part: Using the word in other contexts is absolutely OK, but using it in the same context for other unifications of countries (such as east and west Germany) is "dangerous", as you say, that is, it is suggesting parallels to what happened in 1938.
Jan
2
answered What, exactly, is meant by “Anschluss” in politics?
Dec
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
22
revised What's the meaning of “Deine Mudda”?
added 47 characters in body
Dec
22
answered What's the meaning of “Deine Mudda”?
Dec
22
comment What's the meaning of “Deine Mudda”?
I think the spelling tries to mimic the pronunciation of Mutter in Hamburg.