2,125 reputation
717
bio website
location Berlin, Germany
age 32
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Aug 6 at 9:06

Hi :)

I'm a native German speaker with passable (US-) English skills.

Born and raised in the western part of the beautiful and lucky city of Berlin, I've found relative joy in software development after a few years of aimless meandering and finally moving back to my beloved hometown.


Dec
6
answered Did “Frohes Schaffen!” originate from Nazi propaganda?
Dec
5
comment Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
@Takkat Danke für die Aufklärung. Mir war nur nicht ganz klar, wo S21 auf einmal herkam, und ich dachte, ich hätte da irgendeinen lokalen Zusammenhang zwischen dem Turm und S21 im Frageposting übersehen.
Dec
5
comment Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
Ich verstehe die Anspielung auf Stuttgart 21 nicht. Aber ich würde auch nicht allzu sehr darauf wetten, dass die Textstellen den Begriff 100% korrekt verwenden (falls es überhaupt noch eine genaue, mehr oder minder allgemein anerkannte Bedeutung gibt). Der Autor des Zitats aus den Stuttgarter Nachrichten hat sicherlich auch wegen der Anspielung auf die Kugel des Turms dieses Wort gewählt.
Dec
5
comment Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
I don't really see any resemblance between the tow words; not in pronunciation and certainly not in meaning of the original individual words.
Dec
5
comment Yiddish: common in Europe?
So, no, it is not taught, and neither used nor understood by the broad populace. I have never heard it in ordinary use. Then again, I don't think any of my friends are jewish.
Dec
4
comment What does “IDEL” mean in German?
Perhaps you could record your voice and upload the sound or video, so we could better hear what you mean.
Dec
2
answered What does “kurzheinig” mean?
Dec
2
comment “Es hat”: synonym for “es gibt”?
@Matt, OregonGhost means that even the most plausible of your three sentences, while not grammatically wrong, sounds strange. You'd say "Es steht ein Auto auf der Straße" - "A car is standing/parked/waiting in the street".
Dec
2
comment Is “ich biere gern” a correct sentence to use instead of “ich trinke Bier gern”?
My guess is this phrase was coined as a persiflage of the once ubiquitous advertising slogan "Ich rauche gern". Both form and content are very similar.
Dec
2
comment How to express the condolence?
"Mein [herzliches] Beileid" is certainly the standard, so you can't really go wrong with that (except for a close friend, where this might be too impersonal). The phrases on the site John linked to seem overly kitschig to me, though. They are also quite long, so if you try to say them, you risk coming across like someone who, well, memorized a phrase. Even written, many of these would feel insincere to me, on account of their kitschigkeit.
Dec
2
comment How to express the condolence?
If you weren't close, it's probably safer to use one of the standard phrases John suggested. Though "es tut mir leid" still works. It also depends on whether it's spoken or written; the latter tends to be more formal.
Dec
2
comment Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
I've never heard "es hat sich mir gedacht".
Dec
2
answered How to express the condolence?
Dec
1
comment “Selber schuld” vs. “selbst schuld”
It's english, and (though take this with a grain of salt, I'm not a native english speaker) used to tease other children. I didn't mean it as a translation of "selber schuld", I just wanted to provide some colorful context.
Dec
1
comment “Selber schuld” vs. “selbst schuld”
Yes, it's subjective. That's why I've used "probably" and "feels" :) Though I do think "selbst" is too refined language for most children.
Dec
1
comment Which one is correct: “Zwei in Eins” or “Zwei in Einem”?
(And of course, the "2 in 1" spelling in marketing is used because it is faster to decipher and hammers home the message clearer than the fully spelled-out variants)
Dec
1
comment “Selber schuld” vs. “selbst schuld”
Some context: A child would very probably say "selber schuld" to another child ("neener, neener"). An adult commenting on another adult having taken a big risk and failed would probably state "selbst schuld". The first one feels more teasing to me, and the latter more like a factual statement.
Nov
30
comment When is jen- used?
@Matt I don't really have enough meaningful information to add that isn't already in splattne's excellent answer to merit a whole new answer. But I'll be glad to answer questions in the comments, if you have any.
Nov
30
comment When is jen- used?
@Matt It's universally understood and still used in more formal circumstances (even in spoken language), maybe kind of like the correct subjunctive in english (I wish I were rich). It all depends on the setting and company you're in. Use (usage?) in written language is no problem at all.
Nov
30
comment Wo kommt der Ausdruck “Puschen” her?
Außerdem gibt es noch das Verb "puschen", das offenbar umgangssprachlich in einigen Gegenden für "pinkeln" verwendet wird, evtl. nur Kindern gegenüber.