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comment Why doesn't the “d” in “wird” sound more like the “d” in “würd(e)”?
This is impossible to answer as the sound of the final "d" depends on what comes after. Also, the sound inventory of your mother tongue has a top down effect on your perception meaning that what you perceive is not what I perceive. Only highly trained individuals are able to make an objective judgment. Generally, though, there is no inherent difference between the two. If there is a measurable one here, then it's just characteristic of the speaker. It has no impact on the overall understanding of the word.
Oct
17
comment Anything wrong with this paragraph?
1) We're not reporting, we're voting to close. 2) We've answered about 3000 questions here, I don't see how that is useless 3) There are plenty of proof-reading sites out there. You won't use scissors to hammer in a nail and no hammer to cut your cord, would you. Websites are no different. They have their specific purpose.
Oct
17
comment Anything wrong with this paragraph?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is proof-reading
Oct
17
comment How to ask your Boss politely to sign a document a little bit faster?
please don't propagate bribery ;)
Oct
14
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
14
comment Relative clause - die/sie
I disagree that "diese" is better. There is no ambiguity that "diese" could help clear up and I consider using more complex structures if there is no need for it bad style. That's just my opinion of course but I'm sure I'm not the only one who sees it that way.
Oct
13
comment Relative clause - die/sie
I don't see a reason why we should use "diese" and would therefor say that the more straightforward "sie" is the stylistically better choice. Also, the OP-version may be correct but only with Drama-glasses on.
Oct
13
comment Relative clause - die/sie
It's not a relative clause. Both versions are correct but "sie" is way more idiomatic. You need to use "um zu" here. "zu" sounds poetic.
Oct
10
comment “Schätzen”: How to differentiate between a guess and an estimation?
@Harald.. rein sematisch wohl schon. Das gilt auch für "gemittelter Messwert". Wenn das Rechnen von einem Computerchip erledigt wird, dann wirds interessant, denn da wird eigentlich nur Strom hin- und hergeschoben und das ist nichts anderes als in den meisten Messgeräten.
Oct
3
revised Woher versus Woraus?
added 261 characters in body
Oct
3
comment Woher versus Woraus?
@CarstenSchultz... do you mean that I should make clear that "her" is "here" as in "toward here"? Is something skipped or not... that depends on the definition of "skipping". However, the fact that I can insert an optional "to" (where are you going to) suggests that the mark that "where" does refer to a destination as opposed to a fixed location is just omitted and the distinction left to context.
Oct
3
comment Woher versus Woraus?
@Grantwalzer.. ctd... that, then feel free to edit or tell me.
Oct
3
comment Woher versus Woraus?
@Grantwalzer.. why would you want to delete the last sentence? As for the "woher" vs. "woraus"... you're right that it's probably not entirely clear. The sentence that should answer it is "The from is simply missing...". The point is that German does not give an indication of origin for travel-related "where from"-questions. The prepositions "aus" and "von" do exactly that but since the indication is missing all together so are the prepositions. Why not "woraus"? Because it is a travel-related question? Why "her"? Because German skips the origin all together. If you have an idea how to phrase
Oct
3
revised Woher versus Woraus?
added 143 characters in body
Oct
2
comment Woher versus Woraus?
@Grantwalzer.. of course you can. Also... now there are two downvotes... WHY? I honestly do not understand it.
Oct
2
comment Woher versus Woraus?
Why is there a downvote? I'd really love to know
Oct
2
answered Woher versus Woraus?
Oct
2
comment Translation of “Let me tell you”
In what context? The idiomatic English "let me tell you" is rarely used verbatim in German.
Oct
2
comment Zwiebelschmalz auf Englisch
English seems to distinguish between "lard" (mainly from pork) and Schmaltz (from poultry). As for the onions I think "with onions" is the most widespread (no pun intended) 44.100 hits on google for "Lard with onions"
Oct
2
answered “Schätzen”: How to differentiate between a guess and an estimation?