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awarded  Popular Question
Aug
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
24
awarded  Nice Question
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20
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
14
comment Does capitalization work differently in German than it does in English?
@hiergiltdiestfu... that's a very slippery slope. If I were to vote based on this I would vote close for a whole lot of questions because you can find the answer with just one google search.
Aug
13
comment Can someone explain me “darum, daran” and other words with ‘da’
You should try to break it down into bit sized bits. If you're looking for a more general treatment, then just type it into Google. There are plenty of attempts at explaining these things. You could read some of them and then come back here with the things you didn't understand. Also, you can try out the search here (though it sucks a bit). There are certainly some questions dealing with these things here.
Aug
13
comment “Die Spinne kümmerte sich um die Hütte.” – Why do we need “sich um”?
Well, then just write "what's the function" next time rather than "why". A "why not like [English example]" makes me not want to answer the question. Also: Where do you ask "is sich um a fixed match"? No, it's not. Verbs come with a preposition and sometimes a reflexive. And sometimes the resulting combination is "sich um"
Aug
13
comment Can someone explain me “darum, daran” and other words with ‘da’
I'm voting close as too broad because this is an entire grammar topic. Here's a link that might help: yourdailygerman.wordpress.com/2012/06/19/…
Aug
13
comment “Die Spinne kümmerte sich um die Hütte.” – Why do we need “sich um”?
The question "why isn't it" followed by an English sentence comes across naive and a bit narrow minded. Why should it be like the English sentence? Instead of asking "why" just ask "what is the function of this and that". That's something we can answer. But "why"... the answer to that is "that's how it is, is all."
Aug
13
comment “Die Spinne kümmerte sich um die Hütte.” – Why do we need “sich um”?
@pxc3110... there are plenty and there are thousands with "sich auf" and "sich vor" and so on. The "um" is the same as the English "of" in "take care of".
Aug
13
comment “Die Spinne kümmerte sich um die Hütte.” – Why do we need “sich um”?
What chirlu is trying to tell you is that asking "why isn't it like it is in English" is not a good approach to language learning.
Aug
12
comment Why is “eine Sicherung ziehen” sometimes used for “to make a backup”?
Probably inspired by the (I would say) older "eine Kopie ziehen" which exists in English as well "pull a copy"
Aug
12
comment Difference between “höhnen” and “verhöhnen” as well as “spotten” and “verspotten”
It's wrth noting that "spotten" can be used with Genitive as well... Ich spotte seiner. Das spottet jeder Beschreibung.
Aug
12
comment Bedeutung von: »Er hat das Geschäft geöffnet.«
@HubertSchölnast.. ja so ist es gemeint. Ich glaube gern, dass die andere Bedeutung für dich präsenter ist, als für mich. Wenn aber ein Typ zu dir sagt: "Ich öffne meinen Laden heute 2 Stunden", glaube ich kaum, dass du da irgendwelche Zweifel hast, was er meint. Und wenn, dann müsstest du sie bei der anderen Version auch haben. Und ja, "etwas öffnen" ist ein anderes Verb als "etwas ist/hat geöffnet" aber darum ging es hier nicht. Es geht um "ich öffne etwas" vs. "ich habe etwas geöffnet"
Aug
11
revised Bedeutung von: »Er hat das Geschäft geöffnet.«
added 418 characters in body
Aug
11
answered Bedeutung von: »Er hat das Geschäft geöffnet.«
Aug
11
accepted Konjunktiv 2 zum Ausdrücken reiner Fakten
Aug
10
reviewed No Action Needed Wo/Wie kann ich meinen Wortschatz erweitern?
Aug
10
comment Word order with modal verbs in complex tenses
@VytenisBivainis... I think the officially most correct version would there be "..., das die Jungen das Mittagesenn werden gegessen haben können" but that is some territory where the brain of a native speaker isn't really hard wired for anything. "gegessen werden haben können" "gegessen haben werden können"... nothing really rings a "wrong"-bell and you might hear all in conversation. It think the reason for the "most" correct version is the same structure as this "..., dass ich habe arbeiten wollen".. "..., dass ich werde arbeiten müssen."
Aug
10
comment What is the most common verb for “to introduce.”
@iris... I would add "miteinander" to that. "Bekannt machen" needs a target ("mit" ) in my opinion.