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seen Oct 5 '13 at 12:07

Any man more right than his neighbors constitutes a majority of one.

Henry David Thoreau

Note: I am on a long break from GL&U. I may drop in to fix up some old answer of mine or to respond to a request for clarification.


Jul
18
answered Is it possible to have confusion with different verbs that have some forms in common?
Jul
18
comment Non-natives using strong verbs as they were weak: would this compromise understanding?
something that in English happens all the time You sure? "Mom! Mom! Joey hurted me!" Okay, a pre-schooler can get away with it. Everybody else, though...
Jul
17
revised How to tell date in German?
add link to Zwiebelfisch, note alternative without terminal 's' is O.K., too
Jul
17
comment What is the accurate translation of “stands to reason” within a “logical” context?
Mostly agree with Mac, my default translation for "stands to reason that" is es liegt auf der Hand, dass, to be adapted as circumstances dictate.
Jul
17
comment Does “Tschüssie” sound a little …weiblich?
That is purely a matter of personal perception. First one I ever heard say Tschüssi is a 6 ft. 2 broadshouldered womanizing team handball player, so...
Jul
16
comment Is there a grammatically accurate chart for reported speech in German?
What do you find lacking in de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indirekte_Rede ?
Jul
16
comment Correct cases in a composite complement involving more than a single preposition
Fix your typos and I'll give you the +1 :)
Jul
16
comment Correct cases in a composite complement involving more than a single preposition
It sucks btw that the Markdown syntax used in SE does not include tables in its formatting options (unless you count some jury-rigged "poor man's table") :(
Jul
16
comment Correct cases in a composite complement involving more than a single preposition
Die Kinder gehen in die [S]traße vor dem Haus is not a well-formed German sentence. See my example (7) in the comment above -- auf, not in. I forgot that dative first followed by accusative is also possible: Die Kinder gehen von der Straße ins Haus hinein. Somebody with a penchant for organization ought to draw up a matrix that covers all case-combinations with the least amount of redundancy...
Jul
16
comment Correct cases in a composite complement involving more than a single preposition
[cont'd] (6) "The kids are going into the house on Park Street." Die Kinder gehen ins Haus auf der Parkstraße (accusative then dative.) (7) "The kids are going into the street in front of the house." Die Kinder gehen auf die Straße vor dem Haus (acc. then dative) (8) "The kids are playing in the street in front of the house." Die Kinder spielen auf der Straße vor dem Haus (2x dative, see also example (1) above.) HTH
Jul
16
comment Correct cases in a composite complement involving more than a single preposition
So, going out on a limb LOL: (1) "The kids are going out to play in the street in front of the house." Die Kinder gehen gerade raus, um auf der Straße vor dem Haus zu spielen (2x dative). (2) "The kids are going to the street in front of the house to play." Die Kinder gehen zum Spielen auf die Straße vor das Haus (2x acc.). (3) "The kids are walking up and down in front of the house." Die Kinder gehen vor dem Haus auf und ab (dat.) (4) "The kids are walking past the house." Die Kinder gehen am Haus vorbei (dat.) (5) "The kids are going into the house." Die K. gehen ins Haus (accus.)
Jul
16
comment Correct cases in a composite complement involving more than a single preposition
A sentence like, "The kids are walking in front of the fast food place on Main Street" might make sense if, for example, you had been asked as to their momentary whereabouts and you had a GPS tracker or a roomful of surveillance video that enabled you to give a precise answer instantly. But not really, as we would say "walking up and down in front of" (h/t Mac) or "walking past", not "walking in front of". So I would join Mac's plea for a different English sentence to serve as the starting point.
Jul
15
reviewed Looks Good How to tell date in German?
Jul
15
revised How to tell date in German?
edited body
Jul
15
comment How is “lassen” used in the context of this sentence?
Lassen does not normally mean 'to leave', you may be thinking of verlassen.
Jul
15
answered How to tell date in German?
Jul
15
revised Online dictionary where I can search for second half of compound noun
deleted 85 characters in body
Jul
15
revised Online dictionary where I can search for second half of compound noun
added 82 characters in body
Jul
15
revised Online dictionary where I can search for second half of compound noun
Bring title in line with question body, add tag
Jul
15
revised Online dictionary where I can search for second half of compound noun
added 36 characters in body