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Mar
16
comment Is there a colloquial/slang equivalent of “'them's fight'n words” in German?
O.K., I'm out. OP won't tell us how he intends to use the translation -- as a dropped-in German phrase in a talk that is otherwise in English (with the opportunity for playacting), as text on a Powerpoint slide, or whatever -- and that makes it difficult to give pertinent advice. Not fun.
Mar
15
comment Is there a colloquial/slang equivalent of “'them's fight'n words” in German?
Randall is still playing his cards close to his chest but assuming I guessed his plans right, can we take an informal poll to ask whether people think he can pull it off? (You may want to read the "Berliner" Wikipedia article, linked above, first.) I'm new to stackexchange so if this comment is against the rules, delete away :)
Mar
15
awarded  Analytical
Mar
15
comment Is there a colloquial/slang equivalent of “'them's fight'n words” in German?
@F. Randall Farmer: I'm still intrigued as to how you plan to use that German phrase in your talk. Will it be sprung for surprise effect, akin to JFK's Ich bin ein Berliner in 1963? I would suggest a modification: instead of Ansehen? Hier hast du Ansehen!, say Ansehen? Ich geb' dir was zum Ansehen! while at the same time shaking your clenched fist. Oh, you want a back-translation, too? Geez... alright. It's a play on words, okay? Ansehen is both a noun (= reputation) and a gerund (= looking at): Ima giveya reputation/s.th. to look at!
Mar
15
answered How do synchronous interpreters handle long German split verb sentences?
Mar
14
comment “Am Flughafen” oder “Im Flughafen”?
Mit "am Flughafen" hätte ich in diesem Fall kein Problem. Sowohl zu "im" als auch "am" ließen sich Argumente (und Gegenargumente) vortragen. Für mein Ohr klingen beide Varianten gleich gut. Auch hier könnte man sich für mehr Präzision entscheiden, z.B. "... Großdemonstration in Terminal 1 des Flughafens" und hätte somit die im/am-Entscheidung elegant umschifft (oder überflogen).
Mar
14
answered “Am Flughafen” oder “Im Flughafen”?
Mar
13
awarded  Supporter
Mar
13
awarded  Teacher
Mar
13
answered Is there a colloquial/slang equivalent of “'them's fight'n words” in German?
Oct
6
wiki created politeness description
Oct
6
wiki created politeness excerpt
Jun
22
wiki created orthography excerpt