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Jul
6
comment What is the German equivalent of the English phrase “Fuck me”?
@Dustin In the English language, coarse talk (or vulgar language, the two are not exactly the same) is mostly grounded in sexual function. But in German, it is mostly centered around bowel movements. So your proposal would not fit, I'm afraid.
Jul
6
comment What is the German equivalent of the English phrase “Fuck me”?
Please don't put a space between the @ and the name if you want notification to work. See this mini monograph on DNN Online, it explains what "AA" in the acronym LMAA stands for and gives some historical background. In any case we've already heard from a Berliner that they don't typically say it there in such a context, so as far as I'm concerned Leck mich doch is not the right answer to your question.
Jul
5
comment What is the German equivalent of the English phrase “Fuck me”?
Come to think of it, my suggestion is not a 100 percent fit. (Although I am puzzled that Wurzel has heard it spoken only to others.) Here is where I would say it: my magnetic-tipped screwdriver loses the tiny philips screw which drops into the bowels of the computer I am fixing, getting wedged under the motherboard. Cursing gives vent to my frustration at the unfairness of life... or die Tücke des Objekts / Murphy's law. At the same time, however, I am aware that it's still my fault for not being more careful... so my suggestion is not really wrong, either.
Jul
5
comment What is the German equivalent of the English phrase “Fuck me”?
@bouscher I am happy for someone else to use my comment and collect the points :)
Jul
5
comment What is the German equivalent of the English phrase “Fuck me”?
In parts of Germany, a similarly vulgar expression addressed to no one in particular and used to give vent to momentary frustration is Leck mich doch, but I am not sure how common that is in Berlin. (The two words following this phrase are implied but not spoken. It's a famous (or infamous) line spoken by Ritter Götz von Berlichingen in Goethe's eponymous play and is sometimes represented by its acronym LMAA.)
Jul
4
reviewed Satisfactory Grammaticality of “original italienisches Eis”
Jul
4
reviewed Excellent Does German phonetics fully determine the spelling?
Jul
4
reviewed Excellent When speaking about oneself, should Konjunktiv I or Indikativ be used?
Jul
4
reviewed Satisfactory »Passt das dir?« oder »Passt dir das?«?
Jul
4
reviewed Excellent Welche Präpositionen folgen auf “Portierung” (Softwareportierung)?
Jul
4
reviewed Excellent Das Wort “ich” in offiziellen Schreiben
Jul
4
reviewed Satisfactory How to say “to check the mail”?
Jul
4
reviewed Satisfactory Verwendung von Nein nach negativen Fragen
Jul
4
reviewed Satisfactory Apostrophe with or without space? (»mit’m« vs. »mit ’m«)
Jul
4
reviewed Satisfactory Wie sagt man “Do you know if something?” auf Deutsch?
Jul
2
comment What do you call being “on hold” on the telephone in German?
Note that a lot of people have unwittingly made embarrassing confessions while being put "on hold". Just because you can't hear what people at the other end of the line are saying, doesn't mean that they can't hear you ;)
Jul
2
awarded  Vox Populi
Jul
2
comment What do you call being “on hold” on the telephone in German?
Oh wait I get it, the person asking you is in the room with you. NEVER MIND :)
Jul
2
comment What do you call being “on hold” on the telephone in German?
You are on hold and you know this because there is elevator music playing in the background or there is no sound at all? Then the party at the other end of the line asks you, Are you on the phone (= Are you still there?) Have I got that right so far? Then why would you answer "Yes, but we can still talk, I'm on hold."?
Jul
1
comment German shows/movies with German subtitles
I love the top-ranked comment on the Youtube vid: "Came to learn German, stayed for the titten".