151 reputation
4
bio website abrasive.at
location Melbourne, Australia
age 42
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Apr 24 at 5:51

Born and bred in C++ country, but mostly working with Python these days. Server, embedded, desktop, web, mobile... I like them all.


Apr
24
comment How to say web addresses and version numbers in German?
That's actually one of the few occasions where German is a little more practical than English - having [veːveːveː] with only three syllables, there's no need no to shortcut 'double-u double-u double-u' with 'dub dub dub' as they do e.g. on Australian TV.
Jan
22
comment Translation of “I can't eat spicy food”
One English expression for "ich vertrage scharfes Essen nicht" could be "spicy food does not agree with me".
Jan
15
awarded  Commentator
Jan
15
comment What about “erschreckt” in addition to “bin erschrocken” and “hat erschrocken”?
Erschrecken is tricky. The average German is likely to be unsure if it's "erschrak" or "erschreckte" or whatever, so don't worry too much if it's confusing.
May
8
comment What is the proper use of the word “bang?”
Well, poetic licenses are permissive by nature, so there is nothing wrong with it as such. I just don't know what "Du liesst mich immer so BANG" is supposed to mean. It sounds surreal to me (which might not be a bad thing for a poem...). Also, BANG! could also be the same comic-book-style sound as it might be in English (when a gun goes off or so), especially when spelled in capitals, so the unsuspecting reader might assume some kind of double meaning. Poets are artists after all ;-)
May
1
comment Why are “vier” and the beginning of “vierzehn” not pronounced the same?
I always wondered why the pronunciation of "vier" is so different from that of the same word when it's part of "Klavier". As in all languages, I assume German is pronounced the way that's easiest to speak...
Feb
3
comment How do I use the word “da”
The translation is in the answer I commented on: As of that moment, there was silence. (a different way to say:) From this moment there was silence. (translation:) Von da an [=Von diesem Moment an (or) Seit diesem Moment] war Ruhe.
Jan
24
comment How do I use the word “da”
For example, you're in a restaurant with someone and excuse yourself to go to the restroom: "(Ich) bin gleich wieder da" - "I'll be back in a second". (However, I'm just noticing now that da in this case means here rather than there as you're referring to the current location - I'll be back here in a sec...) Another (better) example: You're talking on the phone to someone and announce your imminent arrival: "Bin gleich da" - "I'll be there in a sec".
Jan
23
comment What is the difference between “verdachten” and “vermuten”?
verdachten does not exist, but it definitely should. It's shorter than verdächtigen, formed more logically and does not require an umlaut. Same goes for vermutig: I know so many people who are so vermutig that I can't believe the word wasn't made up much earlier! Dude, you coined them! :-D (Duden, you're listening ?!?)
Jan
23
answered How do I use the word “da”
Jan
23
awarded  Teacher
Jan
23
comment How do I use the word “da”
I'd like to add as as another translation: This question is quite simple for me as German is my mother-tongue. As I now have your attention, I'd like to start my presentation. As of that moment, there was silence.
Jan
23
answered What's the difference between “Ich habe dich Lieb” and “Ich liebe dich”?
Jan
23
comment Is there a difference between “anschalten” and “einschalten”
Note that there's a similar pair for the opposite: abschalten and ausschalten
Dec
19
comment Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
I'd like to add "Jawohl, mein Hausmeister!", which is another reference to a famous German movie
Dec
19
comment Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
There is no "N-word" in German. Saying it like it is is a German trait. No need for abbreviations or pointless political correctness.
Apr
18
awarded  Supporter
Apr
5
awarded  Autobiographer