358 reputation
15
bio website
location Scotland
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Sep 23 '13 at 19:29

Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for “generation skipping trust?”
I have seen it. =] I have also been to the country in which is set, but not to the city after which it is named. (I did also use the internet to make sure I wasn't wrong before posting this!)
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for “generation skipping trust?”
@TomAu: Sorry, I hope you didn't find my comment insulting. I was just teasing. (Having parents around your age, I do realise that what is trivial to do on the internet for someone my age can feel less trivial to people who didn't more or less grow up with the internet.)
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for “generation skipping trust?”
@Tom Au: Do you think trying an extremely easily searchable source known to be almost always incorrect really counts as 'research effort'? =]
Apr
25
awarded  Yearling
Apr
8
comment “Der gute Mann” vs. “Ein guter Mann”
Wenn es darum geht, ob Information wiederholt wird, dann geht es um die Artikel und die Adjektive.
Apr
7
comment “Der gute Mann” vs. “Ein guter Mann”
@HagenvonEitzen: Ich verstehe nicht ganz, was du meinst: bei der starken Deklination sind die Artikel gleich für Männlich und Neutrum, sodass man daraus doch nicht das Genus erkennen kann.
Mar
5
comment Why is “Vater” spelt with 'V' when it is pronounced like 'father'?
I think the german v still is less 'sharp' than f, actually.
Feb
27
comment Can I say “Montags und donnerstags gehe ich zur Uni um halb elf.” Is this the correct word order?
This doesn't explain why 'gehe ich' comes where it does in the sentence, though, which was one of the things the OP was unsure about.
Feb
27
revised Can I write “Jeden Tag stehe ich halb zehn auf.”
added 142 characters in body
Feb
27
answered Can I write “Jeden Tag stehe ich halb zehn auf.”
Feb
17
comment Is this the correct way to spell the slang term for 'toilet' in German — 'Scheißehaus'?
@TheBlastOne: You can use 'toilet' for the room or building in English, too.
Jan
1
revised 'Dass' since the spelling reform
minor correction to last sentence (it didn't quite make sense)
Jan
1
comment 'Dass' since the spelling reform
@Hubert: Yes, I know, that's what I said. Perhaps I didn't state it in the clearest way? Also I just noticed that the last sentence of my answer doesn't quite make sense.
Jan
1
comment 'Dass' since the spelling reform
@abacus: That is correct. It is the vowel sound before the ß or ss which determines which should be used. Most spelling followed that principle anyway before the reform; the point of the reform was to standardise things like this.
Jan
1
comment 'Dass' since the spelling reform
@elssar: Yes, I do. I think of a vowel primarily as a sound rather than a letter. Another pair of examples would be Fuß and Fluss.
Dec
31
answered 'Dass' since the spelling reform
Nov
24
comment Basic Deconstruction of German
@Emanuel: All four German cases are already included in this list. We don't get every gender in every case, though.
Sep
16
awarded  Critic
Sep
12
comment Learning German helpful for any other language learning
I know this has been closed, and I agree that it probably is off topic. But I just want to say that I disagree with the approach most people are taking in their answers: I think that learning ANY language helps in learning ANY other language, because you learn more about languages by learning a language different from your own. I know the question says 'directly helps', but I think that is a direct help.
Jun
18
comment When (if ever) did “Hors d'oeuvre” become a loan-word in German?
@aslum: Why do you see this example as a usage of 'hors d'oeuvre' in German, when the person was speaking English when he/she used the word?