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location Scotland
age 31
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Sep 23 '13 at 19:29

Jun
8
comment What is the difference between “Wie spät ist es?” and “wie viel Uhr ist es?”
@Em1: I agree that the answer isn't particularly meaningful, but John did ask the question, so it was worth trying to give a better answer than Landei's 'I don't think so'. I don't think 'How late is it?' is nonsense. I can imagine someone asking that in English, although probably only if it was late in the day.
Jun
8
comment What is the difference between “Wie spät ist es?” and “wie viel Uhr ist es?”
@Landei: Certainly there is a difference in the literal translation of the two phrases.
Jun
8
comment What is the difference between “Wie spät ist es?” and “wie viel Uhr ist es?”
I would suggest 'What o'clock is it?' as a literal translation of 'Wieviel Uhr ist es?' It isn't a standard phrase, but one wouldn't necessarily expect that of a literal translation.
Jun
5
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
@Marty: You really think that English has no dialects? Unfortunately many of the dialects are somewhat dying out, but they definitely still exist.
May
24
comment Gegenteil von Apotheose?
Hmm, ich kenne Beispiele von Göttern, die gestorben sind, aber die sind nicht, soweit ich weiß, erstmal 'sterblich geworden'. (Jesus zählt nicht, da er dann doch unsterblich war.)
May
19
comment How do we translate “eye candy” in a user interface design context?
@Takkat: No, I don't think so. The other examples look fine to me.
May
18
comment How do we translate “eye candy” in a user interface design context?
@Takkat: Your first example is written in terrible English! (I have no problem with people writing bad English - I don't write perfect German - but it's just funny to see it listed there as an example of the use of an English word.)
May
18
answered Warum haben Deutsche einen “Vogel”, wenn sie ein wenig verrückt sind?
May
15
answered 'y' as a vowel in German
May
15
awarded  Editor
May
15
revised 'y' as a vowel in German
Fixed the grammar in the second sentence. (It was fine before, but then Gigili changed it to something not quite correct.)
May
14
suggested suggested edit on 'y' as a vowel in German
May
11
answered Simple but interesting German literature
May
11
comment Simple but interesting German literature
I read this amazing book in English as a kid, and only recently found out it's originally German. I must try to get a German copy!
May
5
comment How to move a phrasal verb to the end of a sentence because of “dass”?
Umm... no idea what I was thinking! I know it is separable. Sorry about that.
May
5
comment How to move a phrasal verb to the end of a sentence because of “dass”?
This is because anfangen is not a separable verb.
May
3
comment Words in German that begin in “kn-” and are cognates of the English words with the same meaning
How is this an answer to the question?
May
2
comment “without me” in German
@ Gigili: Nevertheless, Em1 is right. Ohne is always with accusative.
May
1
awarded  Teacher
May
1
comment Is there a difference between “Messer” and “Kniff?”
@TomAu: But the point is that knight and Knecht originate from the same word in some old form of German.