358 reputation
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location Scotland
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Sep 23 '13 at 19:29

May
1
comment Is there a difference between “Messer” and “Kniff?”
@TomAu: But the point is that knight and Knecht originate from the same word in some old form of German.
Apr
30
comment Komma vor “und” bei Aufzählungen mit Mehrdeutigkeit
@Em1: Hendrik und Alexander haben recht. Allerdings ist das doch Dativ, nicht Akkusativ, Alexander!
Apr
30
answered Suggestions on preparing for the Zertifikat Deutsch (internationally accepted certificate in German) exam
Apr
25
awarded  Commentator
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
@userunknown: No, sorry, my example wasn't very good. I just wrote the first thing that came into my head. The way 'like' is used as a filler, it doesn't really mean anything more than 'um'. To illustrate that it doesn't express unsureness, a classic example would be "It's like totally the best thing ever".
Apr
25
comment Gibt es ein Wort, das 'etwas' und 'jemand' zusammenfasst?
Es existiert eine Schönheit. =] (Nicht ernst gemeint.)
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
@verve: Grr, too late to edit my comment. I just realised 'so' has lots of meanings. I mean in the sense of "So, what are we going to do now", for example.
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
@feeela: But 'so' in English can also mean something more like the German meaning of 'so'. Not exactly the same, but closer than the 'deshalb' meaning. For example: "She liked to have everything just so" (that's quite old-fashioned though).
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
@jstarek: This isn't the use of 'like' that verve is asking about in the question, though. Here 'was like' is being used in place of said, rather than as filler. It can't be left out of the sentence without changing the meaning (or even without making the sentence incomplete).
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
@userunknown: There are two main usages I know of. One is just filler and doesn't really mean anything, e.g. "He's, like, a mechanic or something"; the other is to use 'was like' more or less in place of 'said': "And I was like "No way!"."
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
I can confirm that 'like' is pretty commonly used in the UK and New Zealand, even by people in their 20s and 30s.
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
@verve: Based on which English word? Also doesn't mean the same as 'also' in English. It's more like 'so'.
Apr
25
awarded  Supporter
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
Perhaps it depends where you are, but I have definitely heard halt used a lot (in north Germany) pretty much just as filler. I realise it's not just filler, but when it is used almost every sentence and sometimes more than once in the same sentence, it's at least partly filler.
Apr
25
comment What is the German equivalent for these speech fillers from English: “umm…” and “like”?
You've got another one in your example: 'halt' is often just filler.