201 reputation
12
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Jan 24 at 2:08

Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Dec
9
comment When should one use singular form of “hair”, when plural?
I hate to split hairs, but in English, one usually finds "hair" in the drain, not "hairs". Certainly, it's "hair" that clogs the drain, never "hairs". "Hair" with no article doesn't refer to all the hairs on the head in English, it's just non-count, like milk or cheese. If you find "hairs" in the drain, that implies you didn't find many of them, since in English, the non-count is almost never used unless you could easily count the number of hairs involved. That said, your answer is quite helpful.
Nov
27
comment “Ich bin Neurobiologe” oder “Ich bin EIN Neurobiologe”?
Wo Kennedy gennant wird, muss man auch erklären dass er recht gehabt hat. Als nicht-Muttersprachler kann ich nicht von selbst reden, aber manche meinen dass "Ich bin ein Berliner" besser als "Ich bin Berliner" klingt, wenn man Metaphorisch redet, und Mitgefühl betont. Soviel ich weiss, meinte zur Zeit kein Muttersprachler dass Kennedy sich als Berliner Pfannkuchen (was übrigens in Berlin nur "Pfannkuchen" heisst) nannte.
Aug
30
comment Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
It's interesting to compare the ngrams for uncapitalized "jawohl" (often a tag ending for emphasis, as in the example sentence above) and "Jawohl" (capitalized, expressing strong agreement). The former is fairly flat, with a mild peak around 1945, but the latter peaks very strongly around 1945 after growing steadily from the start of WWI, and has steadily declined since, giving a totally different picture of usage patterns.
Aug
28
answered Why are German numbers backwards?
May
15
comment What is the correct answer to “alles klar”?
I've always preferred "wie dicke Tinte", myself :)
May
15
comment 'y' as a vowel in German
Looking around in Duden, I see nearly all of the words with y have a Greek ancestor (including typisch, Typ), but they are the words pronounced like the "name on the tin" (ypsilon), unlike more recent acquisitions/inventions (Yeti, Handy). I just wanted to say it felt like the answer was arguing that Y should be seen as a consonant (which it almost never is), and it looked like the asker mostly needed to know that y is almost always a vowel (usually ü) in German. Looks good to me now. +1
May
15
comment Englischer “Erklärbär”?
What really sells the original, though, is the additional pun from the command form...it's not clear when you call out "Erklärbär!" whether you're calling the bear of that name, or commanding the bear to explain something ("Erklär', bär!"). Which is why I like user unknown's "explain brain" from the comments as well.
May
15
awarded  Supporter
May
15
comment 'y' as a vowel in German
Yeti and Yoga are certainly loan words in German, my impression was that the letter "ypsilon" always has an ü sound except in loan words like those you listed. It may well be the case that Y is rarely used except in loan words, but if it's usually a consonant in non-loan words, then an example native German word that uses it that way would help. Yacht also appears to be a spelling originating from English (the original word and preferred spelling being "Jacht", originally Dutch).
May
15
awarded  Teacher
May
14
answered Englischer “Erklärbär”?