703 reputation
45
bio website
location
age 43
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen 19 hours ago

Apr
10
answered Are these passive sentences correct?
Apr
10
comment Looking for ALL german verbs database
Can there actually exist a list of all verbs? I guess the best you can do is a list of verbs which have been used in notable sources. But German has the ability to create verbs from nouns and to create nouns by combining other nouns, therefore the total set of verbs should IMHO be unbounded (although probably no one would ever say things like "donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitänisiseren").
Apr
10
comment Er liest das Buch nicht
Third possibility: "Nicht er liest das Buch – jemand anderes liest es."
Apr
3
comment Geschlecht neuer zählbarer und unzählbarer Substantive
Also ist der Fisch oder die Spinne persönlicher als das Nagetier? Und der Staub wird generell unterschieden, wie auch der Sand, während das Spielzeug alltäglich gesehen überall "gleich" ist?
Apr
3
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
You claimed that his claim in the comment that it is a participle is wrong. But that claim clearly is directed at the single word, not at the complete construct. Especially given that he was speaking about the German word, where there is no such thing as a continuous form, at least not in the official language.
Apr
3
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@ThorstenDittmar: You cannot translate "Er ist gekommen" mit "He is come" either. Word-by-word translations rarely work, and therefore are not a valid way to determine the type of word or the grammatical form.
Apr
3
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
While "er ist sehend" is grammatically correct, I don't think anyone would say it. Instead people would say "er kann sehen" to indicate that he is not blind. "Er stellt sich schlafend" is different because it doesn't contain "ist".
Mar
26
answered Difference between riechen an und riechen nach
Mar
26
comment Meaning of “Retourenstelle” and “weiterleiten”?
@Toscho: Doesn't "it has been sent" say exactly that? The other would be "it has been received".
Mar
26
revised Meaning of “was” in this sentence
corrected English
Mar
26
suggested suggested edit on Meaning of “was” in this sentence
Mar
3
comment Zusagen plus Dativ
Allerdings sagt der aktive Satz in der Tat, dass die Betriebe zugesagt haben, das selbst zu tun (auch wenn das wohl nicht gemeint war). Sonst müsste es heißen: "Örtliche Betriebe sagten zu, Bäume anpflanzen zu lassen".
Mar
3
comment Is there a rule that dictates whether to use the eszett (scharfes S) or double s?
Actually, Erlebnis was written "Erlebniss" a bit more than a century ago ... books.google.com/ngrams/…
Mar
3
comment Wie schreibt man Umlaute und scharfes S auf nichtdeutschen Tastaturen?
Another option (at least under Linux, I don't know if it is possible under Windows as well) is to have a compose key. With a compose key, letters like " are not "dead", but you can get ä by typing [compose] " a (and you can also use things like compose a e for æ or [compose] 1 2 for ½).
Jun
12
awarded  Yearling
Jun
11
comment What is the proper position of “gern”?
You can also say: "Pizza esse ich gern."
Jun
10
answered Das Wort “ich” in offiziellen Schreiben
Jun
10
comment Das Wort “ich” in offiziellen Schreiben
Allerdings gibt es die Regel, dass man "ich" als erstes Wort nach der Anrede vermeiden sollte. Allerdings nicht in dem Sinne, dass man dafür ein anderes Wort nehmen sollte, sondern dass man den Satz nach Möglichkeit entsprechend umstellt. Also z.B. statt "Sehr geehrter Herr Soundso, ich möchte Ihr Angebot ... annehmen." schreiben "Sehr geehrter Herr Sowieso, Ihr Angebot ... möchte ich annehmen."
Jun
10
comment How to say “I come from Beijing, China” in German?
It's because of that (IMHO strange) trend that people think one has to pronounce cities as they are pronounced in that country. Try to tell an American that he should not say "Munich" but "München", I don't think you'd be very successful. But in Germany we now are supposed to use names for Chinese cities that are written to give a pronounciation close to the Chinese one when spoken with English pronounciation rules.
Oct
31
comment Is „Hochsee tauglich“ wrong?
Actually the sentence as written is correct, assuming the Shogun is named "Hochsee", and Adams builds "taugliche Schiffe" for him. :-)