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1h
comment How can I better learn noun genders?
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes.
15h
comment Differences among “wahr”, “echt”, “wirklich”, “tatsächlich”, “eigentlich”?
This is tooooo broad. Sounds like you want to know 5(5-1)/2 comparisons.
15h
comment Was bedeutet „eines“ in Hölderlins „Wurzel alles Übels“?
Ist es irgendwie ein Wortspiel einig sein, Einer sei und Eines sei? Der erste Ausdruck scheint auch das Gegentil von den zwei letzteren zu sein.
16h
comment Was bedeutet „eines“ in Hölderlins „Wurzel alles Übels“?
Also den Wunsch, es sollte nur eine Person (Einer) und eine Sache (Eins) geben, kann man eben als die Wurzel alles Übels interpretieren?
18h
comment why have they used “müssen” instead of “sollen” here?
Whose answer do you mean?
1d
comment What kind of sentence structure used in cooking recipe?
Man nehme... kommt mir mathematisch vor. Ich wusste nicht, dass es sonst irngendwo verwendet wurde.
2d
comment “Beide” and “beiden”: when do I add the “n”?
One actually needs a whole sentence (or enough information as which is the role of that nouns in the sentence) to be able to deduce the endings: diesen beiden Frauen schenke ich Blumen or diese beiden Frauen kennen mich oder wegen dieser beiden Frauen ... usw.
2d
comment The pronounciation of “e” is so confusing!
@LibéchtWang If "my problem" means a big distance [your language]-German, then, I agree. In any case it's all about getting used to, the time elapsed being dependent of the source language.
2d
comment The pronounciation of “e” is so confusing!
@LibéchtWang The difference in question is not only identified by native speakers, it doesn't even require an advanced level to identify it.
2d
comment Are there any words in German that end with '-ong'?
oblong fehlt.
2d
comment Are there any words in German that end with '-ong'?
I couldn't stop thinking of this Pun-comic
Aug
25
comment When are “gehen” and “”hingehen" most appropriately used?
En passant, I can refer to this question: german.stackexchange.com/questions/7794/…
Aug
24
comment Declension after -selbe words (Im denselben/In demselben/im demselben) with article
Should I use in demselben Jahr for demostrative dem (instead of just a dull article?)
Aug
24
comment Declension after -selbe words (Im denselben/In demselben/im demselben) with article
@Em1 So, derselbe cannot work for what I would like to express?
Aug
23
comment Is there any grammatical passive that applies to nouns?
1) durch induces always accusative, that's not questionable. 2) That's not a sentence. There is no verb in the English example (the gernud would be rather translated as links Attributiv)
Aug
23
comment The loanwords of which languages are to be faithfully pronounced when speaking German?
It does, when you compare English, French, Spanish, usw. speakers. I'm not. Anyway, that is what I meant in the origiinal post as: But, one easily finds counter-examples. Yours --good to know-- is one counter-example more (which is outside my scope, since I don't know Swedish).
Aug
16
comment How to spell “iPod” in German?
@Em1 I see. So, what canoo says is "readability over respect to the logo-designer". Whence Adidas and Canoo, but iPhone and eBay would be the more readable variants (not at the beginning). So your reasoning is: if you agree with Dr. J, you would write eBay.That there are no rules for such a cases is the only fact that makes this spelling not an exception?
Aug
15
comment Does capitalization work differently in German than it does in English?
@GuntramBlohm Product names are nouns. They are not interjections, they are not articles, not conjunctions, not prepositions, ..., they are nouns.
Aug
11
comment Which letters does the German alphabet consist of?
Welcome. We value your contribution. Nevertheless, if you don't modify it, it will likely be removed by the community, since this answer doesn't state something not contained in other answers.
Aug
11
comment Examples when English 'is' becomes deutsch 'haben'
No. Bist du hungrig? is, as far as I know, valid.