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Dec
30
comment Is there a German sound that is similarly difficult for English speakers as th is for German speakers?
@misterben: the sequence "lzsch" is the killer for me, so Zündholzschachtel is just as difficult.
Dec
30
comment Ist das Adjektiv “dämlich” von “Dame” abgeleitet?
Ah, so dimwitted would be a rather "etymologically faithful" translation for dämlich.
Dec
27
comment Can one access online the subtitles for the UT-tagged videos in Bayerisches Fernsehen’s Mediathek?
@Takkat: at least lest be consistent; many things could be of interest to future visitors (stock quotes, sports trivia, you-name-it), but we disallow them for being off-topic. I think the same should go for this one...
Dec
27
comment Can one access online the subtitles for the UT-tagged videos in Bayerisches Fernsehen’s Mediathek?
@Takkat: I agree entirely that in the end this question turned out to be entirely unrelated to the German language; IMO the right solution is to delete the question altogether. It is also, by far, the simplest one. I am all for this course of action.
Dec
26
comment Can one access online the subtitles for the UT-tagged videos in Bayerisches Fernsehen’s Mediathek?
@Takkat: ...people in different time zones will see different tags on the same item in that page. Indeed, eventually I saw both LIVESTREAM and UT markers disappear from the listing for the video I originally posted as an example.
Dec
26
comment Can one access online the subtitles for the UT-tagged videos in Bayerisches Fernsehen’s Mediathek?
@Takkat: OK, I now understand what's going on. First: apparently, the page I listed marks with UT also those shows for which subtitles are available while the show is streaming live, even though this information is (possibly) irrelevant to videos archived in the Mediathek. (Note that in my screenshot, but not in yours nor chirlu's, the show I referred not only had the UT tag, but also a LIVESTREAM tag.) Second, and even more screwed up, is the fact that the website uses the user's local time to decide what entries to mark as LIVESTREAM. This means that...
Dec
26
comment Can one access online the subtitles for the UT-tagged videos in Bayerisches Fernsehen’s Mediathek?
@Takkat: Sorry, I don't understand your comment. Are you saying that the screenshot I posted is somehow fraudulent???
Dec
26
comment Can one access online the subtitles for the UT-tagged videos in Bayerisches Fernsehen’s Mediathek?
That's amazing. I just added my own screenshot to my post, showing exactly the opposite to what yours shows.
Dec
26
comment Can one access online the subtitles for the UT-tagged videos in Bayerisches Fernsehen’s Mediathek?
I reached the video I linked through this page: br.de/mediathek/video/programm/index.html; it is clearly marked UT in that page. It looks like now my problem reduces to finding a reliable why to locate such videos. The example of the page I linked shows at least one way that is completely unreliable.
Oct
24
comment List of German auto-antonyms
Well, all of this is surprising to me, quite obviously... In particular, I never even heard the word "auto-antonym" before. I used it in this post thinking it was a nonce coinage, in the spirit of "for-lack-of-a-better-word". But thanks.
Sep
20
comment Looking for large list of nouns with gender
That's a beautifully done piece of work. Thanks for pointing it out.
Sep
7
comment Anything like the NYT crossword in German?
BTW, thank you both for the pointer to Um die Ecke gedacht. It may be above my head at the moment, but that's fine. I prefer too hard to too easy. It gives me something to aim for.
Sep
7
comment Anything like the NYT crossword in German?
@Wrzlprmft: the NYT puzzle ranges in difficulty from medium (most educated people would be able to get at least half the clues) to hellish (few if any native speakers would be able to solve them without prior exposure to such puzzles). The difficulty level increases gradually from Monday to Saturday. (The Sunday puzzle is special: It is roughly at a Thursday-level of difficulty, but it is bigger.) At the beginning I could only nibble at the easier (Monday) ones. I still found them fun and full of interesting tidbits. I gradually worked my way up to the skull-busting Saturday ones.
Mar
15
comment Reference work on prefixes, suffixes, etc
@Emanuel: I was be-blown away by that blog post; but please, pace yourself, or you'll zer-burn yourself out well before you make it to zu... Heck, you won't make it to hinaus...
Feb
25
comment How does one say “illustrated dictionary” in German?
Thanks for the pointer. This is the only example I know of so far of the kind of dictionary I'm looking for. I'm amazed that Amazon.de does not sell it. Maybe it's out-of-print, or there's just no market for it.
Feb
25
comment How does one say “illustrated dictionary” in German?
@EugeneSeidel: thanks for the correction. Unfortunately, it made no difference. (Since my command of German is tenuous, I rarely use "double quotes" when I search for German words, to avail myself of the search engine's inexact matching capability. Therefore it's perhaps not surprising that fixing my error did not produce more hits.)
Feb
24
comment How does one say “illustrated dictionary” in German?
@knut: Thanks, but, as I emphasized in my question, I am not looking for Bildwörterbücher.
Jan
12
comment Looking for dictionary of synonyms *with usage notes*
@Em1 No, not quite. What I'm looking for could be called an "annotated thesaurus". In contrast to a typical thesaurus, instead of listing all or most synonyms, it lists only the most common ones, but explains the subtle differences that may exist among them.
Dec
26
comment Etymologie von “gemein”
Here's one way to look at it: one would expect that patricians and plebeians will attach rather different connotations to words associated with "the common people": derogatory ones for the former (e.g. "mean"=lowly,nasty; "common"=ordinary,vulgar;), and neutral/positive ones for the latter ("mean"=average,normal; "common"=ours, as in "commonwealth", "community", "common good", "common decency", etc.) The language retains all these echoes, even when they come from opposing camps.
Dec
26
comment Etymologie von “gemein”
FWIW, the same thing happens in English with "mean" (which can be taken either as "average", or as "base, vile, evil"), and even with the Latin-derived "community" and "common" (which can be used in the sense of "ordinary, vulgar, lowborn"). A historical connection between the two meanings seems quite plausible to me.