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seen Jan 4 at 4:15

Sep
6
asked Where is the accusative?
Sep
2
comment Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)
You understood perfectly. Thanks very much for that but I can give you an example for "at" which seems to be a catch all. It's a preposition which is indicative of place particularly concerned with transportation to said place in specific dimensions. Again thanks though, you seem to know what I'm talking about.
Sep
1
awarded  Student
Aug
31
awarded  Editor
Aug
31
revised Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)
Appended question which got to the point.
Aug
31
comment Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)
For example: She gave me a lightbulb She is subject me is indirect lightbulb is direct. Why is she not indirect as she is indirectly involved with the lightbulb.
Aug
31
comment Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)
Yes I would LOL. If you break something down enough, a person should be able to understand it without problem. I've been listening and reading for 9 years. I still don't get the cases. I know their definitions but I can't logically place the different sentence parts into those categorizations which placing them in other categories as well.
Aug
31
comment Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)
I did this forever, which is why I can guess german words VERY often. My problem is, I want to know the rules but everywhere I look, I seem to find rules to explain the rules??? So unfortunately, I don't have an absolute rule as to why to use each case.
Aug
31
comment Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)
That's the thing. Direct object and indirect object make absolutely no sense to me :(. I know what they are and how they're used but not why they're assigned. I don't have a working definition of either one of them besides it's after this and before that? I need a literal definition something that's arguable but all I can find are the stupid rules that govern them. Something like, noun, person, place or thing. Commas mean this. Semi-colons mean that but I can't seem to find what direct and indirect mean at all.
Aug
31
comment Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)
English is my native language. I've always been pretty good at guessing words by how they felt to me and what the sounds implied from other languages/words. That's basically how I passed my English classes (and argued grammar application concepts with my English teachers) but for the life of me, I can't figure out these cases. I keep seeing examples which feel like they could be correct in multiple cases. All the definitions for the cases I've come across are extremely generic :(.
Aug
31
asked Struggling with case concept (the entire concept)