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seen Jul 25 at 20:11

Jul
18
awarded  Cleanup
Jul
18
revised Hat sich das Geschlecht von “Antwort” mit der Zeit geändert?
rolled back to a previous revision
Jul
18
comment Hat sich das Geschlecht von “Antwort” mit der Zeit geändert?
Danke für den fantastischen Link und den Auszug (mit Hervorhebung!), Takkat.
Jul
18
comment Hat sich das Geschlecht von “Antwort” mit der Zeit geändert?
Mitten im Grimmschen Auszug lese ich "man wartet der antwort von dir". Folgte damals auf "warten" der Dativ oder der Genitiv ?
Jul
18
comment Hat sich das Geschlecht von “Antwort” mit der Zeit geändert?
Sehr interessantes andavaurdi (wie immer), OregonGhost. Danke!
Jul
18
asked Hat sich das Geschlecht von “Antwort” mit der Zeit geändert?
Jul
17
comment What Exactly Does “lebendig” Mean?
I was quite surprised when I first heard that both "e" 's in that word are open. I had expected a closed "e" followed by a schwa, as in "leben". Explanation someone? (I feel that this is not important enough to warrant a new question).
Jul
10
revised How to properly address “Graf zu”?
added parenthetical remark
Jul
10
answered How to properly address “Graf zu”?
Jul
10
comment Difference between “ist um die Ecke” and “liegt um die Ecke”
@OregonGhost: ah, your comment was posted while I was modifying mine. I didn't know the word tohuwabohu existed in German, but as I just wrote in my modified comment, it is tohu-bohu in French too.Interesting, thanks. Anyway, I find the fate of these wandering loan-words fascinating (but to tell the truth I find everything about languages fascinating...)
Jul
10
comment Difference between “ist um die Ecke” and “liegt um die Ecke”
@OregonGhost,@tohuwawohu : it should indeed be tohuwawohu. The second sentences of Genesis begins in transliteration as: Veha'arets hayetah tohu vavohu .Here is the interesting link from which I copied that mb-soft.com/believe/txw/bereshi2.htm (However in French it is indeed tohu-bohu)
Jul
10
comment Difference between “ist um die Ecke” and “liegt um die Ecke”
@FUZxxl: liegen literally means lie and it is legen that means lay. The simple past tense of lie is lay,=German lag. This is rather confusing and even anglophones make mistakes in that context. My mnemonic for keeping things straight is to remember the title of Faulkner's novel As I lay dying
Jul
10
answered Difference between “ist um die Ecke” and “liegt um die Ecke”
Jul
9
comment How to alphabetically sort a list of names?
Ah yes, thanks, Oregonghost. I was confused by your, er..., spiritual name :-)
Jul
9
comment How to alphabetically sort a list of names?
Glad you took that as good humouredly as it was meant, tohuwawohu!
Jul
9
comment How to alphabetically sort a list of names?
You mention "local phone book", OregonGhost. In which country are you? By the way, I made myself the same remark about Dörfener and Dorfer, but I lazily liked that it made that part of the answer a no-brainer!
Jul
9
answered Konjunktiv in mathematics without subject at the beginning
Jul
9
comment How to alphabetically sort a list of names?
I don't know why tohuwawohu and Christoph ignore John von Neumann in their ordering: I suspect some sinister plot is afoot:-)
Jul
9
revised How to alphabetically sort a list of names?
added remark on von Neumann
Jul
9
answered How to alphabetically sort a list of names?