283 reputation
26
bio website seanmccleary.info
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Jul 3 at 17:10

Mar
26
comment When to use “gibt es” and “es gibt”, respectively?
Keep in mind also that questions in German are phrased more like in very old English, with the verb at the beginning of the sentence. Whereas today you'd ask, in English, "Do you have any wool?" you could, if you wanted to say it old fashioned, say "Have you any wool?" German questions are more like that. So "Gibt es..." is how you'd start a question.
Mar
26
answered When to use “gibt es” and “es gibt”, respectively?
Dec
7
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
4
awarded  Popular Question
May
31
awarded  Yearling
Aug
18
answered Is 30-60 minutes per day enough to get fluent in eight months?
Jul
15
awarded  Scholar
Jul
15
accepted Difference between Erfahrung and Erlebnis?
Jul
9
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
7
awarded  Student
Jul
7
asked Difference between Erfahrung and Erlebnis?
May
31
awarded  Teacher
May
31
answered Is it acceptable to omit umlauts and put an extra 'e' instead?
May
31
comment Unknown gender, known case, best guess for article would be?
So what's the alternative? (a) don't converse until you've learned all definite articles of all words, (b) limit your conversation to only those words for which you know the definite article, or (c) choose a random definite article when you don't know it?
May
31
answered Unknown gender, known case, best guess for article would be?
May
31
awarded  Supporter
May
31
comment Good online resources for improving German over Summer Vacation?
Amen to Deutsche Welle. Their website has a WEALTH of downloadable material, for print and audio. They also have a daily news podcast in slow, simple German, for beginners.