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Aug
27
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
You are confusing consonant shifts with different pronunciations of the same consonant. In order to show a consonant shift you would have to show a minimal pair for the shift in question. I.e. the word with the other consonant must be understood as a different word. That is simply not the case with "koscht" vs "kost". s to sch (or vice versa) is here no shift, it's simply a different pronunciation. (Compare with "hat" and "cat" which show that <k> and <h> are understood as two different consonants.)
Jul
22
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
There are no two or more consonant shifts between Swabian and Bavarian nor between any of the other dialects you mention. As such, I dismiss your dismissal as invalid.
Nov
24
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
1
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
9
comment “Der gute Mann” vs. “Ein guter Mann”
Akkusativ: einen guten Mann, den guten Mann. In beiden Fällen wird einem die Info, dass Mann maennlich ist, zweimal verraten; eine Wiederholung wird also nicht vermieden.
Apr
6
comment “Der gute Mann” vs. “Ein guter Mann”
Ich kann jemanden mit "guter Mann" ansprechen, aber nicht mit "gute Mann". Der Unterschied ist also nicht satzgliedintern. Es handelt sich um zwei Faelle, die beide Subjekt sein koennen, aber nur einer kann wie ein Vokativ verwendet werden.
Apr
5
asked “Der gute Mann” vs. “Ein guter Mann”
May
31
awarded  Yearling
Feb
1
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
I don't think intelligibility can be ab objective criterion for whether two forms of speech are distinct languages or dialects of the same. My method is objective. Of course it doesn't map perfectly onto intelligibility but neither does any one standard of intelligibility map perfectly onto any other.
Feb
1
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
Dutch and (High) German have between them distinct consonant shifts. There are dialects between Dutch and German that vary from the one or the other only by one consonant shift (half-language) or incomplete consonant shifts.
Feb
1
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
As for vocabulary, I think a language is based on rules, i.e. grammar and rules about how to form words. Two forms of speech using totally different vocabulary could still be the "same language" according to my definition, they would just be two registers (or whatever we want to call it). Examples are languages that indeed do have two different sets of words for different situations (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avoidance_speech) or English (which has a set of Germanic words and a set of French-derived words used in different situations).
Feb
1
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
For Ukrainian and Russian we'd have to find a consonant shift table. I wouldn't know. As for v-to-w shifts, I think it is possible for a consonant to be pronounced differently and ultimately such might become a consonant shift. The difference between the first and the second is that when the first is current, both pronunciations are still understood as equivalent.
Jan
28
awarded  Supporter
Jan
27
accepted Hab und Gut: What is the difference between “Hab” and “Gut”?
Jan
27
comment Hab und Gut: What is the difference between “Hab” and “Gut”?
@JohnSmithers That's what I thought. If I'm not the only one who reads the term that way, I assume it is correct.
Jan
27
asked Hab und Gut: What is the difference between “Hab” and “Gut”?
Jan
27
answered Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
Jan
4
awarded  Commentator
Jan
4
comment Wann starb der Plural auf “-s” im (Alt-)Deutschen aus oder wo kommt der Plural auf “-s” im Englischen her?
@Giorgio Das waere eine Erklaerung.
Jul
4
comment Zweistellige Zahlen und Stellenwertsystem
Ich denke nur, dass die Verwirrung eher damit zu tun hat, dass die Woerter fuer die Zahlen voellig unabhaengig von den Zahlen sind. Woerter folgen weder der Leseweise von geschriebenen Zahlen, noch sind sie das genaue Gegenteil davon.