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Jun
17
comment Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
+1 Thank you for this learned and precise answer. I had the idea that wealthy came as a second meaning to mighty also because money is a more recent phenomenon than sheer might. I'd probably argue that the actual introduction of money could be the cause of the specialisation of reich in wealthy. But since this is a phenomenon common to many languages German, Dutch, English, Spanish, Italian and French to name just a few, it is probably an early phenomenon. Please note that all these languages have a Celtic substrate but only Dutch and German still use Reich as "kingdom".
Jun
17
asked Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
Jun
14
comment Origin of Separable Verbs
@user12889, the of thumb rule in English is that intransitive phrasal verbs are inseparable (as per the very definition of intransitivness: for instance "I get out") and that transitive phrasal verbs have a good chance of being separable. For instance, consider 'I look up a word in the dictionary' (the object is not inserted between the verb and the preposition), and 'I look it up in the dictionary' (when the object is a pronoun it is always inserted between the verb and the preposition).
Jun
10
answered Origin of Separable Verbs
Jun
10
comment Origin of Separable Verbs
I've addressed this question partially in this answer in the English Language and Usage forum.
Jun
9
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
8
comment Meaning of Mann as a tribe rather than a male individual
Thanks. I'm still interested in this subject. As for Normannen being a loanword from French, please see the note [1] which I've just added to the initial question.
Jun
8
revised Meaning of Mann as a tribe rather than a male individual
added 393 characters in body
Jun
7
revised Meaning of Mann as a tribe rather than a male individual
deleted 251 characters in body
Jun
7
comment Meaning of Mann as a tribe rather than a male individual
+1 - Sorry if this sounds ironic, but whilst you're saying that "I'm looking for something that does not exist", you actually seem to be giving the solution on the next line. Putting aside, as you suggest, the tribal sense. The Mannen (a weird weak plural for a strong noun btw) sense of group of men in arms is close to what I'm looking for especially in the compound name "Ala-mannen". A possible conclusion so far is that Mann itself is not a collective noun for a tribe but "Mannen" has a military meaning compatible with "Alemannen" and possibly "Markomannen" or "Normannen".
Jun
7
comment Meaning of Mann as a tribe rather than a male individual
@Stovner. Absolutely. In the sense of "Menschheit" you have will find for instance the landmark documentary "The Ascent of Man". The sense of "Mann" I'm looking for is closer to "Mannschaft" - "Menscheit" is a relatively new word in German. The noun Mann-shaft is actually possibly another indication ("Soldaten einer militärischen Einheit").
Jun
7
awarded  Editor
Jun
7
revised Meaning of Mann as a tribe rather than a male individual
added 330 characters in body
Jun
7
awarded  Student
Jun
7
asked Meaning of Mann as a tribe rather than a male individual
Jun
2
awarded  Teacher
Jun
2
answered Deutscher Konjugator / German conjugation tables
May
31
awarded  Supporter