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19h
answered Unterschied zwischen sich rüsten und sich vorbereiten
19h
comment ,,Freude über etwas'' or ,,Freude auf etwas''
You can sich auf etwas freuen, but you rarely use the term Ich empfinde Freude auf .... You might want to say Ich empfinde Vorfreude auf [z.b. die Ferien, meinen Feierabend, etc.], but most of the time you'll say ich freue mich auf ....
19h
answered How to correctly form a sentence that has an “als auch” construct
Apr
27
comment What's the difference between “streiten” and “sich streiten”?
More frequently than not you hear something like this in the news: Die Abgeordneten stritten über den Haushalt 2017. Is this "wrong" then?
Apr
24
comment How does the pronunciation of “dass” compare to “das”?
Also, the overall answer to this question is: It doesn't matter. Das is an article or relative pronoun. dass is a conjunction. Das can be used to start a relative clause, dass can not. So this answer explains it correctly.
Apr
24
comment How does the pronunciation of “dass” compare to “das”?
There's also a rule for doubling consonants. One could argue that it should be applied in this case, too, even though after the consonant no other vocal follows here (which would prove my point by indirect evidence). Be it as it may, your "I'm from northern Germany" argument has no significance here, as it doesn't prove anything. I, however, can tell you for sure that there are regions in Germany where das and dass are pronounced differently. And this answers the question whether they are always pronounced the same with a clear in most parts of Germany, but not everywhere.
Apr
23
comment How does the pronunciation of “dass” compare to “das”?
I can also remember that in school teachers pronounced das with a longer a than then dass. In spoken German you will most of the time not notice a difference, though (depending on the dialect. It is pronounced differently in Bavarian dialects). The spelling rules say that you use "ss" for a unvoiced "s" after a short vowel and a "ß" behind a long one (Fass, Fraß, Gruß, Kuss, etc.). So going back from this rule you could say that the a in dass should be pronounced significantly shorter than the a in das, however, most of the time it isn't.
Apr
23
comment How does the pronunciation of “dass” compare to “das”?
@HubertSchölnast Nein, der Grund für die Falschschreibung ist eine Grammatikschwäche - wer Relativsätze nicht erkennen kann, kann auch das und dass nicht unterscheiden. Deswegen wird jeder vernünftige Deutschlehrer ein falsches das/dass auch nicht als Rechtschreibfehler, sondern als Grammatikfehler werten.
Apr
20
comment »ck«, »tz« ,»vv« und »ww« als Sonderfälle von Doppelkonsonanten
@BarthZalewski Was bedeutet deiner Meinung nach ein "?" - eine Frage oder eine Antwort? Ich frage, ausformuliert, wie Du die genannten Wörter betrachtest, insbesondere, da Deine Frage Lehnwörter nicht ausschließt.
Apr
20
comment »ck«, »tz« ,»vv« und »ww« als Sonderfälle von Doppelkonsonanten
Akkumulator? Pizza?
Apr
18
answered Does German language have “possessive apostrophe”?
Apr
14
answered Why “mag” instead of in “möge” in “daß das richtig sein mag”?
Apr
14
comment Herkunft und Verbreitung des Wortes „olei“
Ich kenne das als "Ulei" und kann definitiv sagen, dass es im Bereich um Schwalmstadt dann wieder verwendet wird.
Apr
12
revised More on Ambiguous Diminutives
edited body
Apr
12
revised More on Ambiguous Diminutives
added 140 characters in body
Apr
12
answered More on Ambiguous Diminutives
Apr
12
comment More on Ambiguous Diminutives
@MartyGreen There is no such thing as a standard diminutive -el in Bavarian (I am from Bavaria). Bavarians tend to end nouns with -erl, which is the dialect form of "-chen" or "-lein". For example, there's "Häuserl" (Häuschen) or "Vögerl" (Vögelchen) or "Zügerl" (Züglein). Like -le in Schwaben: "Häusle", "Vögele", "Zügle".
Apr
12
comment Dativ plural ohne Artikel
The last two sentences, however, are different in that An Wochentagen essen wir ... does not restrict the weekdays, while An (den) Wochentagen, die mit "M" anfangen... does (only those starting with "M"). This restriction makes the article obsolete, as I said above. You are comparing apples to peas here by using two different sentences. You should either use the pair An Wochentagen essen wir vs. An den Wochentangen essen wir or An Wochentagen, die mit "M" anfangen ... vs. An den Wochentagen, die mit "M" anfangen....
Apr
12
comment Dativ plural ohne Artikel
An Wochentagen, die mit "M" anfangen... means On any given weekday that starts with an "M"... while An den Wochentangen, die ... means On all of the weekdays.... This describes two equal sets of weekdays, if you want to use mathematical terms :-) You are correct about the article in your other examples and you are correct about An den Wochentagen, die mit "M" anfangen... being different from An Wochentagen essen wir ....
Apr
11
comment Dativ plural ohne Artikel
In that case the meaning is the same: on all weekdays that start with an M you eat fish. The fact they start with an M makes both variants equally specific.