3,464 reputation
215
bio website tdittmar.posterous.com
location Germany
age 38
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen 2 days ago

Apr
17
comment How to say “now a days…” / “nowadays” in German?
@Takkat Well, the question would not have come up without it, would it, but yes, I'll keep the discussion to the meta thread.
Apr
17
comment Substantivierung: “Mein Suchen war nicht von Erfolg gekrönt”
Doch schon, aber "mein Tun" hat eine leicht andere Bedeutung als "meine Tat". Ich hätte schreiben sollen, kein gleichbedeutendes Substantiv.
Apr
16
comment How to say “now a days…” / “nowadays” in German?
@Takkat Sorry, I disagree here. The spelling mistake is an integral part of the problem here, so it is a must that the question remains as it is.
Apr
16
comment Substantivierung: “Mein Suchen war nicht von Erfolg gekrönt”
Klappt aber nicht immer so schön wie in Deinem Beispiel. Manchmal gibt es nur die Substantivierung. Beispiel: Mein Tun war nicht von Erfolg gekrönt. Für das Verb tun gibt es - außer dem substantivierten das Tun - meines Wissens nach kein anderes Substantiv.
Apr
10
comment Can one suppress the comma of a relative clause in parenthesis?
@Alex Sure that this is a relative clause? It does not refer to the subject of the main clause (which would be Vergangenheit). A better example for a relative clause would be In seiner Vergangenheit (an die sich nur wenige erinnern konnten) gab es
Apr
8
answered Welches Geschlecht hat “Quest”?
Apr
7
awarded  Cleanup
Apr
7
revised How to say “now a days…” / “nowadays” in German?
rolled back to a previous revision
Apr
4
comment “Gateway language” to German
@Emanuel You're suggesting to him he should hear Dutch to help him on his way to learn German? That's courageous... :-) Seriously, user1999728: If your goal is to learn German, start hearing German. You'll get used to it. I think that learning languages that are close to German first will help you mix languages up later, but nothing more.
Apr
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
3
revised What is the etymology of Gelegenheit?
deleted 6 characters in body
Apr
3
answered What is the etymology of Gelegenheit?
Apr
3
answered Help with Sogar and Darauf
Apr
3
revised How to say “now a days…” / “nowadays” in German?
added 344 characters in body
Apr
3
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
@celtschk I think you're missing my point. I say that subject + is + ing-form is the so called present continuous. Emanuel corrected me by saying that going is the participle, which is correct if you regard only the word itself. However, I'm just saying that you need to regard the entire grammatical construct, not just part of it. If you did that, you'd translated He's just leaving as Er ist gerade verlassend, which you don't because you know that He's just leaving is present continuous.
Apr
3
revised Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
added 17 characters in body
Apr
3
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
I agree with you on er stellt sich schlafend, but I've heard er ist sehend sometimes (even though I must admit that er kann sehen is the better way to say it).
Apr
3
answered How to say “now a days…” / “nowadays” in German?
Apr
3
comment Herkunft von “Ausnahmen bestätigen die Regel”
"probare" means "to test" no matter whether a) or b). Of course the sentence changes its meaning if you change the verb! The original question is, however, why can you derive the English version from "The exception tests the rule" while the German version can not be derived from "Die Ausnahme prüft die Regel".
Apr
2
comment Is “Er ist gehend” or “Er ist am gehen” proper German?
Or would you translate He's just leaving as Er ist nur verlassend without crying a little?