Reputation
5,522
Next tag badge:
74/100 score
19/20 answers
Badges
4 22
Newest
 Enlightened
Impact
~129k people reached

Jul
9
comment Warum gibt es keinen “Trompetisten”?
Die Bezeichnung für diese Art Blechbläser braucht eben nicht so filigran zu sein :-D (sorry, das musste ich als Holzbläser loswerden - ich fände Trompetist auch logisch, habe es aber wirklich noch nie gehört).
Jul
3
comment What is “Your favorite movies teaching you new languages” in German?
I prefer Matthias' answer, because the sentence clearly sounds like a headline (forum, etc.) where a person either lists the user top votes on movies that teach people new languages or asks other people for their favourite movies that teach people new languages. Also, your translation is clearly wrong: To get to your German sentence, the original should be "Your fav. movies teach you new languages" or "... are teaching you ...". But just "teaching" would translate to "Ihre Lieblingsfilme, die Ihnen neue Sprachen beibringen".
Jul
3
comment German equivalent of “Jack of all trades”
@O.R.Mapper Me neither. There's no real reason to limit this to children. Esp. "Alleskönner".
Jun
30
comment Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
@CarstenSchultz I edited my answer to hopefully make this clearer.
Jun
30
revised Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
added 271 characters in body
Jun
29
revised Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
edited body
Jun
29
comment Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
@chirlu - ooops, yes, that should actually be a now :-D
Jun
29
comment Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
@E.V. As I said "Das meine Haus" doesn't work in German. "Das grüne Haus", however, does, as "grün" is an adjective :-) "Quella casa" would translate into "dieses Haus", where "dieses" is called demonstrative pronoun (dieses, jenes, etc.). They can be used instead of the normal article (der, ein, die, eine, etc.) to put emphasis on something ("Ist das dieses Haus?", "Nein, es ist das [Haus] da drüben."). They behave like articles, though. Also, in German they are not adjectives :-D
Jun
29
comment Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
@E.V. I hope my Latin helps me here, but doesn't "La mia casa" translate into "Die meine Haus" (so actually "Das meine Haus")? This looks like an adjective alright, but in German, this construction doesn't exist. I may be mistaken here, so somebody correct me, but a pronoun remains a pronoun and never suddenly becomes an adjective in German. You can say "Das ist mein Haus", but here, mein again replaces the person/institution the house belongs to. "É mia" translates into "Das gehört mir". "Es ist mein Eis" or "Es sind meine Rollschuhe" shows that of course it changes its number.
Jun
29
comment Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
@chirlu I actually mean it is not an adjective. It's a possessive pronoun (as the term "pro noun" implies, it is a word that replaces a noun). Articles also change depending on gender and number, still they are not adjectives :-) What I mean is: "seine" is not an adjective to "Leistungen" as the OP thinks. If the sentence stated the person's name we wouldn't discuss this.
Jun
29
comment Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
I corrected this a 40 minutes ago. sein is of course a possessive pronoun.
Jun
29
revised Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
added 67 characters in body
Jun
29
comment Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
@chirlu Sorry, added the "possessive pronoun" part later without removing the genitive thing I wrote first... Edit my answer.
Jun
29
answered Explaining the adjective endings in “Für seine guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad”
Jun
25
comment Can “manche” induce singular? (“Winterreise” example)
@Jan This is a weird way of thinking of it. It will also mostly confuse people. Just because the article is die, it doesn't suddenly make a noun feminine singular. Die Männer is still masculine nominative plural and you should really not be saying die Männer is feminine, but der Mann is masculine.
Jun
23
comment When to use German subjunctive?
@KilianFoth Actually, to be grammatically correct, your comment should read No, Future I, and no. Even though in every-day language present-tense will be used.
Jun
23
answered When to use German subjunctive?
Jun
22
comment Unterschied zwischen “sofort” und “sogleich”
@carstenschultz Ja wie gesagt - ist ja auch nicht schussfest, meine Argumentation. Natürlich wird man einige Gegenbeispiele finden können. Persönlich verwende ich es jedoch tatsächlich so.
Jun
22
answered Unterschied zwischen “sofort” und “sogleich”
Jun
16
comment Can the polite form ‘wie geht es Ihnen’ be shortened to ‘wie geht’s’?
Actually, Wie geht's is not a short for Wie geht es dir but a short for Wie geht es. And that makes it informal enough that you should not use it in formal situations.