164 reputation
10
bio website paleografie.tk
location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Jul 26 at 12:27

Jul
14
awarded  Critic
Jul
14
comment es mit + Substantiv
I believe the expression es ernst meinen mit x is idiomatic and fixed as such.
Jul
13
awarded  Editor
Jul
13
awarded  Teacher
Jul
13
revised Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
clarified "-en ending"
Jul
13
revised Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
added 100 characters in body
Jul
13
suggested suggested edit on Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
Jul
13
answered Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
Jan
5
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
11
awarded  Talkative
Oct
30
comment Why is indirect speech marked by modus instead of tempus in German?
German is not really an exception: the subjunctive/conjunctive and optative are very common in Greek and Latin. Cf. dicit Romanos urbam delevisse quam nuper oppugnavissent, and the Greek optativus obliquus. Often tense is used in conjunction with mood in Latin. But the indicative is rare in indirect speech in Latin, at least in the classical era.
Sep
6
awarded  Quorum
Jun
16
comment Why is “Fräulein” considered offensive, as opposed to “Frau”?
Hah, very true. I suppose she should have a chip built in that transmits her dating preferences through wifi.
Jun
4
awarded  Commentator
Jun
4
comment Why is “Fräulein” considered offensive, as opposed to “Frau”?
Oh, so then it would be an instrument against polygamy as well! I was joking.
Jun
4
comment Why is “Fräulein” considered offensive, as opposed to “Frau”?
Could be useful for dating. How many times haven't we all...
Jun
3
comment When is the last sound of a syllable unvoiced?
Right, in the end it all comes down to models and frameworks! Keeping in mind that PIE /m/ and /n/ were often partially or fully vocalized as om/mo/am/ma/o/a/etc. in certain daughter languages often makes it easier to brainstorm for etymological connections, in my experience. I'd forgotten the term sonorant, a useful class.
Jun
3
comment When is the last sound of a syllable unvoiced?
Interesting! Dutch writes and actually pronounces all of those schwas: handelen, verevenen, etc. It strikes me that this phenomenon (only? mainly?) occurs with pairs of stop + liquid/nasal consonant. Is it that this schwa was for some reason dropped only from those combinations? Or was it actually introduced into those combinations for ease of pronunciation in the first place? My guess would be the latter: those nasals and liquids were probably vocalized from PIE (semi-)consonants, and the resulting schwas were therefore "weaker" than those schwas that came from reduced vowels.
Jun
3
awarded  Scholar
Jun
3
accepted Wie sprechen die Salzburger den Namen ihrer Stadt aus?