164 reputation
10
bio website paleografie.tk
location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
age
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Mar 19 at 19:15

Dec
30
comment “ich” in different cases
Hmm I would say you can change genders mid-sentence with a copula, then, but the subject still has an invisible gender in those sentence. I conclude that based on your in your last sentence you should, technically speaking, use "das".
Dec
30
comment “ich” in different cases
The article does not directly modify the subject; it modifies Schönste. However, it could be argued that die/der/das Schönste modifies the subject, ich. It must be of the same gender as ich and changes accordingly as ich is a male or a female speaker. Die Königin is die Schönste is similar. Unless it is possible to say das kleine Mädchen ist die Schönste; is that possible?
Dec
30
comment “ich” in different cases
Ich does have a gender: it's just not visible, because there is no article. But you can see it in ich bin die/der/das Schönste, right?
Nov
11
comment Warum “das” in “ein Haus an das Ufer bauen”?
I would say there is a movement/direction: you take the (not yet existing) house from its place on the drawing board, or your imagination, and move it onto the riverside my building it there. And physically you're moving lorries and bricks and other building materials thither.
Oct
29
comment Use of abbrevation “ff.”
It means "and the following [pages, items...]". So "see page 303 and the pages following 303".
Jul
14
awarded  Critic
Jul
14
comment es mit + Substantiv
I believe the expression es ernst meinen mit x is idiomatic and fixed as such.
Jul
13
awarded  Editor
Jul
13
awarded  Teacher
Jul
13
revised Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
clarified "-en ending"
Jul
13
revised Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
added 100 characters in body
Jul
13
suggested approved edit on Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
Jul
13
answered Difference between Ihr and Ihnen
Jan
5
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
11
awarded  Talkative
Oct
30
comment Why is indirect speech marked by modus instead of tempus in German?
German is not really an exception: the subjunctive/conjunctive and optative are very common in Greek and Latin. Cf. dicit Romanos urbam delevisse quam nuper oppugnavissent, and the Greek optativus obliquus. Often tense is used in conjunction with mood in Latin. But the indicative is rare in indirect speech in Latin, at least in the classical era.
Sep
6
awarded  Quorum
Jun
16
comment Why is “Fräulein” considered offensive, as opposed to “Frau”?
Hah, very true. I suppose she should have a chip built in that transmits her dating preferences through wifi.
Jun
4
awarded  Commentator
Jun
4
comment Why is “Fräulein” considered offensive, as opposed to “Frau”?
Oh, so then it would be an instrument against polygamy as well! I was joking.