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Nov
21
suggested suggested edit on Tense and Aspect
Nov
21
revised Tense and Aspect
edited tags
Nov
21
comment Tense and Aspect
Another point is that tense is only one property of verbs which affect inflection. Other properties are mood and voice and person and number. This is what makes inflecting languages different to agglutinating languages. For some reason though it seems very common that people misinterpret "tense" to mean "inflected form of a verb". They are related but distinct.
Nov
21
comment Tense and Aspect
Who says it's mistaken. These are called "compound tenses". I think you're confusing tense and inflection. Even languages with no inflection at all can have tense. But maybe I'm just having trouble reading what you're trying to say?
Nov
21
revised Tense and Aspect
edited tags
Nov
21
comment Can I start to make rudimentary sentences in German after a week worth of exposure to German?
As an anecdote, my German was good enough to talk for hours to a Romanian lady a few months ago who had German rather than English as her second language. But my German is not good enough to read this answer.
Nov
11
awarded  Organizer
Nov
11
revised Dropped 'H' in 1901 Orthography Conference
edited tags
Nov
5
comment Can I start to make rudimentary sentences in German after a week worth of exposure to German?
I should mention that the Lonely Planet Phrasebooks have had several editions and the grammar section is no longer very good. I think most people are scared of grammar and don't buy books with too much so the publishers cut it down. People learn in different ways and for me their way of summarising grammar was very helpful to get a feel of the mechanics of the language rather than just rote memorizing of phrases.
Nov
5
revised Can I start to make rudimentary sentences in German after a week worth of exposure to German?
address which bits of grammar to learn first and a bit on children's books
Nov
5
answered Can I start to make rudimentary sentences in German after a week worth of exposure to German?
Nov
4
accepted Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
30
answered Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Oct
30
comment R's: Trilled R, Uvular Fricative R, and Uvular Trill R
French doesn't have an uvular trill, it has an uvular fricative. For me the fricative is pretty easy but the trill is extremely difficult even though I can produce other trills such as the Spanish one. -- Correction: Wikipedia says French does have it in some dialects though I've only heard it in German.
Oct
30
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I never said anything about its original form directly influencing Germany. That would be nonsensical. But conquered peoples often still provide words to the occupying language all over the world. Under rule of the Teutonic Knights the place was still called Prussia. The Prussia of this form seemed to have a huge influence on the Unification of Germany. There's no logical reason that Prussia under German rule wouldn't absorb any Old Prussian words that would further spread into general German use. It's happened plenty in the rest of the world.
Oct
7
awarded  Critic
Oct
7
comment Is it “als” or “wie” (or both) that is translated, “as”?
Was it always wrong in Bavaria or did it suddenly become wrong after the ascension of Hochdeutsch? Why would Bavaria speech be more horrible than Hanover speech? Or is this something new in Bavaria that just the kids do?
Aug
29
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
It seems the history is quite a bit more complicated than I expected (-:
Aug
27
revised What is a good way to start learning German?
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