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Nov
11
awarded  Organizer
Nov
11
revised Dropped 'H' in 1901 Orthography Conference
edited tags
Nov
5
comment Can I start to make rudimentary sentences in German after a week worth of exposure to German?
I should mention that the Lonely Planet Phrasebooks have had several editions and the grammar section is no longer very good. I think most people are scared of grammar and don't buy books with too much so the publishers cut it down. People learn in different ways and for me their way of summarising grammar was very helpful to get a feel of the mechanics of the language rather than just rote memorizing of phrases.
Nov
5
revised Can I start to make rudimentary sentences in German after a week worth of exposure to German?
address which bits of grammar to learn first and a bit on children's books
Nov
5
answered Can I start to make rudimentary sentences in German after a week worth of exposure to German?
Nov
4
accepted Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
30
answered Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Oct
30
comment R's: Trilled R, Uvular Fricative R, and Uvular Trill R
French doesn't have an uvular trill, it has an uvular fricative. For me the fricative is pretty easy but the trill is extremely difficult even though I can produce other trills such as the Spanish one. -- Correction: Wikipedia says French does have it in some dialects though I've only heard it in German.
Oct
30
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I never said anything about its original form directly influencing Germany. That would be nonsensical. But conquered peoples often still provide words to the occupying language all over the world. Under rule of the Teutonic Knights the place was still called Prussia. The Prussia of this form seemed to have a huge influence on the Unification of Germany. There's no logical reason that Prussia under German rule wouldn't absorb any Old Prussian words that would further spread into general German use. It's happened plenty in the rest of the world.
Oct
7
awarded  Critic
Oct
7
comment Is it “als” or “wie” (or both) that is translated, “as”?
Was it always wrong in Bavaria or did it suddenly become wrong after the ascension of Hochdeutsch? Why would Bavaria speech be more horrible than Hanover speech? Or is this something new in Bavaria that just the kids do?
Aug
29
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
It seems the history is quite a bit more complicated than I expected (-:
Aug
27
revised What is a good way to start learning German?
++
Aug
27
answered What is a good way to start learning German?
Aug
27
comment English analog to “Stelzbock” or why so few sexual cusses for men?
This seems to be a sociology/cultural question and where it does become a language question it's asking about English in comparison to already known terms in German, not asking about German. As such it seems to belong more on english L&U than here.
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I did some hunting on the English Wiktionary and in fact I can only find one German word from any Baltic language. "Elen", a synonym for "Elch" from Lithuanian. I don't know how rare or regional it is...
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I'm in chat now if I can help clear anything up there. It works better than back and forth in comments.
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I don't think your reasoning is sufficient. Wikipedia says Old Prussian wasn't fully extinct until the 19th century so it seems possible some localized words may have been retained just as has happened in many other languages around the world.
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I am talking about the Baltic language. What have I said that makes you think otherwise? Sorry for the confusion.