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bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Hohhot, China
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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
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Nov
4
accepted Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
30
answered Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Oct
30
comment R's: Trilled R, Uvular Fricative R, and Uvular Trill R
French doesn't have an uvular trill, it has an uvular fricative. For me the fricative is pretty easy but the trill is extremely difficult even though I can produce other trills such as the Spanish one. -- Correction: Wikipedia says French does have it in some dialects though I've only heard it in German.
Oct
30
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I never said anything about its original form directly influencing Germany. That would be nonsensical. But conquered peoples often still provide words to the occupying language all over the world. Under rule of the Teutonic Knights the place was still called Prussia. The Prussia of this form seemed to have a huge influence on the Unification of Germany. There's no logical reason that Prussia under German rule wouldn't absorb any Old Prussian words that would further spread into general German use. It's happened plenty in the rest of the world.
Oct
7
awarded  Critic
Oct
7
comment Is it “als” or “wie” (or both) that is translated, “as”?
Was it always wrong in Bavaria or did it suddenly become wrong after the ascension of Hochdeutsch? Why would Bavaria speech be more horrible than Hanover speech? Or is this something new in Bavaria that just the kids do?
Aug
29
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
It seems the history is quite a bit more complicated than I expected (-:
Aug
27
revised What is a good way to start learning German?
++
Aug
27
answered What is a good way to start learning German?
Aug
27
comment English analog to “Stelzbock” or why so few sexual cusses for men?
This seems to be a sociology/cultural question and where it does become a language question it's asking about English in comparison to already known terms in German, not asking about German. As such it seems to belong more on english L&U than here.
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I did some hunting on the English Wiktionary and in fact I can only find one German word from any Baltic language. "Elen", a synonym for "Elch" from Lithuanian. I don't know how rare or regional it is...
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I'm in chat now if I can help clear anything up there. It works better than back and forth in comments.
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I don't think your reasoning is sufficient. Wikipedia says Old Prussian wasn't fully extinct until the 19th century so it seems possible some localized words may have been retained just as has happened in many other languages around the world.
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I am talking about the Baltic language. What have I said that makes you think otherwise? Sorry for the confusion.
Aug
26
revised Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
call it Old Prussian instead of Prussian and try to explain why i didn't do it from the beginning
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Sorry @Sean Patrick Floyd: I did mean the Old Prussian language and added a link to make that clear and some comments asking if I should make it more explicit. I guess I should...
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Yes I did add the link - was that enough?
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I wasn't sure whether to call it Old Prussian since that sounded a bit technical. I see the smiley but if the question really could confuse people thinking I meant the modern dialect rather than the now extinct Baltic language. Let me know if I should change it or just go ahead and edit it (-:
Aug
26
awarded  Editor