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Aug
26
revised Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
call it Old Prussian instead of Prussian and try to explain why i didn't do it from the beginning
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Sorry @Sean Patrick Floyd: I did mean the Old Prussian language and added a link to make that clear and some comments asking if I should make it more explicit. I guess I should...
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Yes I did add the link - was that enough?
Aug
26
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I wasn't sure whether to call it Old Prussian since that sounded a bit technical. I see the smiley but if the question really could confuse people thinking I meant the modern dialect rather than the now extinct Baltic language. Let me know if I should change it or just go ahead and edit it (-:
Aug
26
awarded  Editor
Aug
26
revised Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
link to wikipedia article on old prussian
Aug
26
asked Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Jul
29
comment How to alphabetically sort a list of names?
Yes many languages have specialized sorting rules for telephone books. In English Mc- and Mac- are often (possibly always) sorted together.
Jul
26
comment Is it good style to use latin phrases?
Personally I'm always surprised how much Latin I see in German writing considering my assumption that German had much less contact/influence from Latin and romance languages than English did.
Jul
24
comment Where does/did word-formation in German language happen?
Can you name some of these scientists and their fields?
Jul
16
comment Why do many English philosophers speak German. Are there problems with translating German philosophical texts?
What do you mean by "translated hardly". We don't use the word "hardly" this way in English where it would normally come before a verb and means "barely" which doesn't seem to fit your question. Do you mean "translated literally" perhaps?
Jul
16
comment Is Walliserdeutsch generally considered the hardest to understand German dialect?
@Hendrik: Ah perhaps "cross" was a bad choice of words. There certainly is a dialect continuum between German and Dutch and Frisian but there isn't anything like a dialect continuum between English and Dutch or Frisian but I'm yet to do a linguistic tour of rural England or Netherlands to listen to the dialects and accents change. It would be fun though (-:
Jul
16
comment Is Walliserdeutsch generally considered the hardest to understand German dialect?
@Hendrik Vogt: I think Dutch developed before English so I can't see how it could be the product of English and German crossing.
Jul
16
comment Is Walliserdeutsch generally considered the hardest to understand German dialect?
@burbuja: If German and Swiss German are completely different then the difference between for instance German and Arabic must be completer (-:
Jun
27
comment What does “Weichspülmusik” mean?
@Joachim: Yes I think most people learn the generic sense of muzak before the learn it's a trademark as did I. Still it's worth warning people depending on what context they may wish to use it in English.
Jun
27
awarded  Commentator
Jun
27
comment What does “Weichspülmusik” mean?
Muzak is a trademark. Elevator music is the most common non-trademark term for this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzak_Holdings
Jun
14
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
14
accepted What's the difference between “Dialekt” and “Mundart”?
Jun
13
asked What's the difference between “Dialekt” and “Mundart”?