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4h
comment “Ich wurde geboren” vs “Ich bin geboren”?
I'd say a more common colloquial variant would not be the passive past but just "Ich bin/komme/stamme aus Berlin".
2d
comment How to end a complaint letter in German
On this matter there is a nice article on Knigge.de (not to be taken too seriously). There also is a summary on Wikipedia where "Hochachtung" would still be appropriate... not that I want to correct you, but it may be preceived different to the intention you had in your letters of complaint ;)
2d
comment How to end a complaint letter in German
Today Hochachtungsvoll is no longer in use. It may only occasionally still be seen in letters from old to very old people (80+).
2d
comment How to end a complaint letter in German
Reopened: meta.german.stackexchange.com/questions/807/…
2d
comment Meaning of “Einen Lauf geben”
@rogermue: die haben das nirgens gelernt. ;)
Jul
26
comment Where don't we use an article with God
@Karl: interesting! You should back this up with quotes e.g. in an own answer, otherwise I consider this comment as plain wrong and misleading.
Jul
26
comment Was ist der Unterschied zwischen „vorliegen“, „geben“ und „bestehen“ im Sinne von „existieren“?
Ludi, vielleicht ist es dir nur entgangen, aber üblicherweise duzen wir uns hier: meta.german.stackexchange.com/questions/36/…
Jul
26
comment Generisches Maskulinum
Es gibt schon einige Fragen zu diesem Thema hier: german.stackexchange.com/questions/18744 german.stackexchange.com/questions/2370 german.stackexchange.com/questions/13735 (englisch) german.stackexchange.com/questions/7963 (englisch) - keine beantwortet aber Deine Frage nach dem System dahinter und wann man das generische Maskulinum nicht verwenden sollte. Vielleicht möchtest Du in Deiner Frage präzisieren, was Dir an den dortigen Antworten fehlt, damit die Leute hier kein Duplikat sehen.
Jul
26
comment Where don't we use an article with God
Thinking of it - the rules are the same as for people's names. Omitting the article with "Gott" may be a Chrisitian's work aound for God being nameless. This is even better reflected in English, when God used as a name is being capitalized but the noun god isn't.
Jul
25
comment Where don't we use an article with God
@Em1: what but the sentence in the question would I have commented upon? Comments are not for general wisdom but for single issues in a post. Your example is quite interesting, as it may point to an answer. We do say "der liebe Gott", "der allmächtige Gott", etc. but your example would be odd without the adjective "Der Gott weiß, dass ich kein Engel bin".
Jul
25
comment Should one put a comma after an explaining phrase?
Actually I do find it extremely odd to use an article in the sentence above. From all what I know it should read "Ich habe eine Frage, die Gott betrifft". In case that had changed recently I'd be interested to learn more: german.stackexchange.com/questions/24637/…
Jul
25
comment Should one put a comma after an explaining phrase?
Just a side note: we would not use an article with Gott.
Jul
23
comment Artikel in »Die Augustiner-Bräu«
@Jan: don't vote on "delete" in the first place? Deleting an otherwise harmless answer generally is not a good idea as this makes all efforts to improve it impossible.
Jul
23
comment When is 'to' translated with “um zu”, when with “zu”
@Jan now, is your comment in any way helpful for somebody who has doubts on deciding when to use zu, or um zu on translating such an infinitive construction from English to German? This was what I had asked here, it really was not about the usage of infinitive constructions in general. More precisely, in the very early days of GL I had mainly asked it for us to find out what kind of questions may be possible here. In case you feel that today such a question would not be a good fit, then please go to German Language Meta to discuss this.
Jul
22
comment Is there a difference between “Leiche”, “Leichnam”, “Toter”, or “Verstorbener”
@Ludi: This may come from a different propagandistic terminology - and there still is a peak for Tote.
Jul
22
comment Was bedeutet “chicks/checks geben” in der Jugendprache?
Schließlich konnten sie mir erklären, was das ist: grob anschubsen, bzw. den anderen in den Nacken hauen.... ("das machen doch alle") also passt wohl checks.
Jul
21
comment Does German differentiate between a “pomelo” and a “grapefruit”?
For Austria this may be a rather new development similar to Germany where Pampelmuse (fomerly spelt with an 'o') is also increasingly being replaced by Grapefruit. See e.g. Österreichisches naturhistorisches Bilder-Conversations-Lexicon 1838 (set in Fraktur) with a nice overview on possible variants of Pompelmuse.
Jul
20
comment Was bedeutet “chicks/checks geben” in der Jugendprache?
@Crissov: ich habe deinen Kommentar mal als Edit zur Frage aufgenommen, damit deine Antwort passt.
Jul
20
comment Was bedeutet “chicks/checks geben” in der Jugendprache?
@Crissov: kann sein, er hat es zwar wie chicks ausgesprochen, aber im Kontext könnte das gut passen... Antwort?
Jul
20
comment Does “wollen” ever function like English “will” to signal a future event (no volition)
As much as I do believe that all your edits are helpful in clarifying your question I somehow feel that the text body became a bit long to read, Any chance to make all this a bit shorter so that future visitors could see more quickly what your question was about?